Mr Selfridge (2013–2016): Season 2, Episode 3 - Episode #2.3 - full transcript

The store is preparing for the Empire Exhibition but Agnes is struggling with her display and Thackeray is not pleased when Harry reinstates Henri, who has offered to help her. Nor is Rose happy to find Gordon has some saucy photos but in the resultant confrontation he makes her see that she should give Harry another chance. Consequently she declines her husband's suggestion that she should return to America if there is a war and they agree to support each other. Kitty gives Frank another chance as they take a picnic to Green park whilst Grove reencounters Miss Mardle who, thanks to a legacy, is now a woman of property, making him regret his not marrying her. Lady Mae learns that Loxley has huge gambling debts and threatens to expose this should he ever lay a finger on her again and, following the success of Agnes and Henri's impressive display, Loxley offers to invite Winston Churchill to open the exhibition. However Harry must inform the staff that Churchill cannot come as Britain is now at war with Germany, following the latter's invasion of Belgium. Ignorant of the carnage to come, the people sing 'Rule Britannia' at Delphine's club.

Are you wondering how healthy the food you are eating is? Check it - foodval.com
---
(plants rustling)

(man hawking newspapers)

Read all about it!

My brother says he wants
to join the Cavalry.

JESSIE: Their uniforms
are ever so smart.

You'd look nice in one, Franco.

You won't catch me
getting on a horse.

What's wrong
with using your legs?

Nothing, if they
look like yours.

Ah…

I've been looking
for you.



Come on.

We need to do the menus
for next week.

Sorry, I forgot.

You could help me out
a bit more, Franco.

I'm busy enough as it is.

This Empire Exhibition's
the last thing I need.

Not very patriotic of you,
Mr. Colleano.

But of course you're Italian,
so why should you care?

Don't take any notice of her.

She's not the first one
to say it.

Has any post arrived for me,
Miss Plunkett?

I'm expecting
a parcel.

Nothing for you
in the first post, Mr. Crabb.

Have you seen Mr. Grove yet
this morning?



Does anyone ever see
Mr. Grove?

(door opens)

MAN: Good morning, Mr.
Selfridge.

Good morning.

Can I ask, Mr. Selfridge,
what did Mr. Ridley want?

Our financial position
is strong.

According to Mr. Ridley,

if there is a war,
nobody will shop.

I disagree and told him so.

How are preparations
for next week going?

We've taken out
a great deal of advertising.

That's good.

Empire Week needs to run
like clockwork.

I presume Mr. Grove
knows that?

I'm sure Mr. Grove is aware
of the situation, chief.

He's not even here, is he?

What's wrong
with this man?

What is it?

Do you think, sir,

we're going to fight
the Germans?

Is that
what you think?

Why should I tell you if I did?

All she wants is
a little reassurance.

I know.

So why not give it to her?

Because it's much more amusing
not to.

Where are you going?

Out.

Where to?

Anywhere.

Away from you.

(chuckles)

(sighs)

(whistling)

(talking quietly)

What have you
got there?

Those are pretty racy!

Wouldn't mind
a bit of that, eh?

None of us would.

What's going on?

Uh… nothing.

AGNES:
Then around the store

there will be several themed
Empire displays.

Fine.

I've set one up
as an example

so that you can see
what I'm trying to achieve.

In Fashion,
We're representing the Raj,

SO…

Good morning,
Mr. Selfridge.

Mr. Thackeray.

Where's my display?

I spent half the night
putting it up.

Your display?

Oh, my dear Miss Towler,
I had no idea.

But I told you…

When I arrived
this morning,

there was this drab little motif
at the center of my department.

I thought I should get rid of it
before the customers arrived.

It wasn't finished.

But I could always
put it back.

It's a bit late
for that.

I suggest this stay

and we find another place
for the Raj,

the Palm Court perhaps?

I'm sure that Mr. Colleano
will oblige.

VICTOR:
I'm not having the rifle.

It'll scare my customers away.

If the tiger hasn't already
given them a heart attack.

These displays
are still in progress.

I'm sure Miss Towler
can adapt them.

Of course I can.

Shall we go downstairs,
Mr. Selfridge?

You're late.

I got caught in a peace rally
at the end of Oxford Street.

It was utter chaos.

Good morning,
Mr. Selfridge!

Good morning,
Miss Hawkins.

AGNES: Many of our
beauty products

are influenced
by the Orient,

so there'll be a display
of Chinese parasols and fans

behind the counter.

Colorful, I hope,

so they attract the eye?

Very colorful,
Miss Hawkins.

Nobody will miss you.

How about Accessories?

Ah, Miss Mardle!

You've come back to us.

Indeed I have,
Mr. Selfridge.

Good morning.

Morning.

Your brother?

Well, we buried him
last week in Geneva.

I am so sorry.

Thank you.

What have you planned
for Accessories, Miss Towler?

I haven't worked it out yet.

But we must have
something.

Beauty is getting
a whole display,

as Miss Hawkins
has informed me-- twice.

GROVE:
And you have less than a week.

It is a bank holiday
on Monday.

A huge amount can be achieved
in a small amount of time,

and I'm sure that
Miss Towler is aware

of how important
this Empire week is.

I am, Mr. Selfridge.

Very good.

Carry on.

My office now, Mr. Grove.

I'm not going to beat
about the bush, Mr. Grove.

I'm disappointed in you.

You're late all the time,
office is a mess,

you're not on top
of Personnel.

That is an unfounded
accusation.

All right, then,

the basics:

how many male staff
do we employ?

Eight hundred and fifty.

Nine hundred
and forty-nine.

Female employees?

I do have this information,
Mr. Selfridge,

just not at my fingertips.

You have to know your people,
otherwise you can't manage them.

This is your
final warning.

Up your game or you're out.

Good evening, sir.

Good evening, Fraser.

Is Mrs. Selfridge in?

I'm afraid not, sir.

(sighs)

But you have a visitor,
Mr. Selfridge.

He's waiting
in the courtyard.

You wouldn't believe
how glad I am to see you.

I just came because
Mrs. Selfridge was kind

and visited me.

I was rude to her.

I wanted to apologize.

She's not here.

Stay for dinner.

Oh, no, thank you.

I have a whole humidor
filled with cigars

that were just delivered.

Someone's got to smoke them
with me.

The same old Harry.

I'm not so sure about that.

Oh, no.

I shouldn't have
let you go.

You couldn't have
stopped me.

No, but it was
the way I did it.

I don't know
what I was thinking.

I lost the greatest
creative director around

and my best friend,

neither of which
have been replaceable.

Is this an apology

from the great
Mr. Selfridge himself?

What am I supposed to do, beg?

I'd like to see that
very much.

(laughing)

Old friend.

Come back to the store.

No.

No, absolutely not.

Why not?

I don't need
your charity, Harry.

It's me who needs you.

The store's a mess, Henri.

My heads of department,
they're bickering,

I'm about to sack
my head of Personnel…

Mr. Grove?

I don't want to.

But if he doesn't pull together,
I'm going to have to.

Well, I am sorry that you have
problems at the store,

but it makes no difference.

Then there's Miss Towler.

Agnes Towler?

Yes.

How is she?

(sighs)

She's the Head
of Display now.

I sent her to Paris
to train under Lafayette.

Yeah?

She's under
a lot of pressure.

We have our Empire week
celebration

and she's struggling.

Come and help her out.

Come on, Henri.

What do you say?

Morning.

Good morning.

Good evening out?

Yes, it was.

Very.

You missed Henri.

He came to visit last night.

Henri was here?

He was coming
to see you.

He wanted to apologize.

He doesn't have anything
to apologize for.

Thank you for finding him, Rose.

He wouldn't have come here
if it hadn't been for you.

Well, that is not
what you thought before.

I was wrong,
and I'm sorry.

Yes, you were.

I'm going to work.

Gordon?

Are you all right?

I hate the fact that you and Pa
aren't getting along.

I'm sorry, I didn't mean
to fight in front of you.

He's trying so hard with you.

Where did you get these?

Gordon…
(door slams)

Thank you so much
for coming.

We can't be late for work.

It's only I feel
I need a man's opinion,

and I don't know
who to turn to.

What's this all about?

My brother spent
most of his life abroad.

He never married.

And he left the house
and the contents to you?

It's such a responsibility.

It's a gold mine!

I can't sell
any of it, Roger.

It was his.

It wouldn't feel right.

How many bedrooms are there?

Six.

Well, live here.

Take paying guests.

They'd keep you company
and provide a regular income.

Actually, he left me
an income as well.

You're a woman
of independent means.

It's a great deal to take in.

If I may say so,

it couldn't have happened
to a better person.

Lady Loxley.

BANKER: It's a while since
we've seen you at the bank,

Lady Loxley.

MAE:
Yes, indeed.

(bell rings)

Under no circumstances must
Loxley ever know about this.

I'll make sure of it,
Lady Loxley.

Thank you.

Yes, you may put it away now.

You're Jeremy,
aren't you?

That's right.

I know your father.

I can call you Jeremy,
can't I?

Of course.

Have there been any rumors
around the bank

about my husband?

I couldn't say.

You see, I fear Loxley
has money troubles.

He's so solicitous,
he doesn't want to worry me.

But I'm his wife;
I need to share his burdens.

Is it true?

I did hear my father
talking about it

with my grandfather.

And?

Gambling debts, apparently.

People have asked him
to honor them

because of the uncertain times.

Well, of course.

How bad is it?

My father said Lord Loxley's
all washed up.

PLUNKETT: I said you were
taking no appointments.

And I said Mr. Selfridge
would make an exception for me.

What is it, Lord Loxley?

I am rather busy.

Planning your Empire
celebration?

You've got to ask if there's
anything to celebrate.

We've sucked up
to filthy types in Europe

in order to protect
our foreign interests.

Look at the result.

I haven't got time
to talk politics.

How about politicians, then?

Winston Churchill would like
to open your Empire week.

I saw him last night
at the House.

He likes the fact
that you're

keeping the public happy,
Selfridge.

I suggested to him
that he show up and do his bit.

That's kind of you.

I'll arrange it, then.

Thank you.

Oh, and you know I'm on the
Military Procurement Committee.

No, I didn't.

I need a list

of British leather
manufacturers.

We're in short supply
of military boots.

Getting ready, I'm afraid.

Any thoughts?

I know pretty much every leather
manufacturer in Britain.

Get me some names
as soon as possible.

I'll let the committee know
you've done your bit.

MARDLE: These drawers
are a disgrace.

I go away and everything
falls to pieces.

Where have you been,
Miss Mardle?

Somewhere nice, I hope?

Mr. Leclair!

How wonderful to see you!

You too, looking so well.

Pearls suit you.

Oh!

Uh, they're new.

But then, you always did
notice everything.

Where can I find Miss Towler?

Mr. Grove?

I presume you know that
unless I pull myself together,

I'm out on my ear.

The chief doesn't want that.

None of us do.

I've taken the liberty.

I hope you don't mind.

I ordered these manuals
from America.

Mr. Selfridge
is always talking

about keeping abreast
of innovation.

They contain some rather
interesting ideas.

You sent off for these?

Yes.

To America?

For me?

You'll get through this,
Mr. Grove, I know you will.

Rise to the challenge
like the splendid chap you are.

Good luck.

As you pointed out so clearly
in front of Mr. Selfridge,

the tiger display isn't
going to work in here,

so I'm going to try
something simple

but still Indian in feel:
silk cloths on the tables

and bird cages
out on the terrace.

With live birds
screeching at us all day?

Thanks very much.

What's the matter
with you?

Why are you being
so difficult?

All this?

Some people have got
real problems.

(sighs)

(sighs)

That was a bit harsh.

She's just trying
to do her job.

You're right.

I don't know why
I'm taking it out on her.

I do.

I just wish I could
be normal around her.

Go on, find her.

Say sorry.

Henri?

Agnes?

I've been looking for you
everywhere.

(laughing)

Henri!

Miss Towler,

all grown up.

Why are you here,
Henri?

Why aren't you in America?

What about Valerie?

I thought you were
going out there to be with her?

It did not work out.

I'm sorry.

But the job with
the advertising agency,

that must have been
exciting.

Yes, it was certainly that.

But I want to talk about you.

Head of Display?

It's wonderful.

The problem is
I'm not very good at it.

I don't believe that.

We've got this exhibition
opening next week,

and it's just not right.

Maybe I could help?

Mr. Selfridge has asked me
to come back

just for the Empire
Exhibition.

But if you don't want me to,
I won't.

Henri, please come back.

I need you.

More than anything.

You've been avoiding me.

I haven't.

I'm not angry
about the pictures.

I just want to say that
what they represent…

Well, it's not everything.

Relations between
men and women

should be about love, Gordon,
not just physical intimacy.

Surely they should be
about both.

Isn't that the point
of marriage?

Excuse me?

Since you and Pa
stopped sharing a bedroom,

neither of you
have been happy.

That is not true.

And I wasn't thinking about
your father and myself when…

Maybe you should.

You're making him
miserable.

Over the years, he's made me
fairly miserable too!

Why did you come back
from America at all?

You should either
stay out there

or be here and try
to make it up with him.

Gordon, it's very complicated.

Do you still love him?

Yes, I do.

Then I don't see
why it's complicated.

(Gio speaking Italian)

This is it for us.

Finished.

If there's a war,

you think anyone
will want to eat our food?

More like they put us
in front of a firing squad.

It's not our fault.

VICTOR: You've been here
30 years, Uncle Gio.

Me and Franco
were born here.

I'm as English
as the next man.

In war, everything will change.

(sobbing)

Gabriella?

Now look what
you've gone and done.

(sobbing)

Don't take
any notice of him.

He always thinks
the worst.

He's right.

They will come for me.

Hey…

No one's going
to come for you.

Oh, Victor…

If there is a war,
will you look after me?

Of course I will.

I was not sure
you liked me, but now…

I don't think we've met
since that crazy tango night.

Yes, well,
I've been indisposed.

Are you better now?

Yes, I am.

But I do have
a favor to ask.

I need a reliable locksmith
to come to the house,

and I was hoping you could
organize a Selfridge man.

Of course.

This evening,
while the Lords is in session.

Loxley, he hates disturbances,

so it's best to do the work
when he's not there.

I will arrange it,
it's no trouble.

Thank you.

How is it, having Lord Loxley
back in London?

We're like ships
that pass in the night.

I was just wondering,

are you having
any financial problems?

He closed your account,

and I haven't seen you
in the shop in weeks.

Loxley hates to part
with his money, that's all.

So when he's in town,
I have to behave.

Nothing more than that?

No, nothing more than that.

He's asked me for a list
of leather manufacturers

for military boots,

and I'd prefer
to take that information

to the Procurement
Committee myself.

But they won't open their doors
to you, Harry.

In a crisis, the establishment
stick together.

Can I trust Lord Loxley?

You can trust Loxley.

I promise you.

That's all I need to know.

You tell him that
I'll run up a list for him

in the next couple of days.

Good day, Miss Hawkins.

Come to see Mr. Selfridge,
Mr. Edwards?

No, I've come
to see you.

I'd like to take you out.

We tried that, remember?

It wasn't a success.

I was a fool.

Give me another chance.

Maybe.

Just as long as it's
somewhere nice.

Excellent.

The bank holiday's
set to be fine.

I'll meet you outside Green Park
underground station at 11:00.

Till then.

HENRI: You know what
you've forgotten?

The heart of the empire.

It can't be…

Great Britain.

Oh, of course.

Now you say it,
it's seems so obvious.

As they enter,

the customer would see
the British flag.

AGNES: Maybe a
statue of Britannia?

Excellent!

Miss Hawkins.

Mr. Leclair.

Will there be a band?

Yes.

They must play
British music.

Mr. Leclair.

Oh, Mr. Colleano.

You're back.

I'm just here to help

with the Empire
celebration.

Very good.

And what about Accessories,
Mr. Leclair, Miss Towler?

Well, this is the heart
of the store,

so with your permission,
Miss Mardle,

the Britannia
will stand right here.

Wonderful.

Who is that gentleman,
Mr. Colleano?

Henri Leclair.

Oh.

So that's Leclair.

I didn't imagine
he'd look like that.

What do you mean?

He's rather shabby.

Well, he can't just swan back
into the store

and expect his job back.

Looks like he just has.

(doorknob jamming)

Mae?

Let me in.

I've been vouching for you
around town, Loxley.

But if you ever
come near me again,

I'll tell the whole world
you're a bankrupt.

Do you hear me?

I'll scream it
from the rooftops.

Understand?

What time is it?

It's 9:00.

9:00?

Why aren't you at work?

It's a bank holiday,
remember?

Oh.

Of course.

Thank you.

We need to talk.

The news from Europe is
getting worse.

The French have mobilized troops
along the German border.

I was thinking…

Perhaps you should
go back to America.

What?

What's the point
of you staying?

You could be in danger,
and I don't want that.

I will not run away
like a coward!

Is that how you want people
to think of me?

Of course not.

I'm just trying to do
what's best for everyone.

I'm sorry.

I know I'm being difficult

and you're just trying
to make things right between us.

I don't know
how to get your trust back

except to keep on trying.

I don't know what's going
to happen if there's a war.

I have the store to think about,
and my staff.

Then let me help you.

I can't leave now,
not when you need me.

I won't let you stay
if it's about duty.

It's not just about duty.

Really?

Really.

Stay, then.

And I promise,
I swear by everything,

I won't let you down.

Thank you.

But right now…

I want to spend the day
with my wife.

We have a lot
to catch up on.

So that was how
I got started:

sweeping the floor
of the post room

of the Irish Times.

Imagine.

Mr. Frank Edwards,
a broom pusher!

A bit less
of the "Mister" then.

You'd have thought my name was
"You there!"

Oh, poor you.

Bullied, were you?

Terribly.

How about you?

How did you get started?

My dad had a stall
at Borough market.

Now I know why you can sell
anything to anyone.

We're not so unalike,
you and me.

Except I'm on the way up

and you are holding on
by your fingertips.

It's true, I need a scoop.

Is that why you're always
hanging round Mr. Selfridge?

He's good COPY-

Well, don't expect me
to tip you off.

Loyal, are you?

Yes.

Although I wish
he'd sent me to Paris.

Oh, London's not so bad.

Dining alfresco
in the sunshine.

Another glass?

Well, I suppose
it is a holiday.

There we are.

Your good health.

Right.

(yawning and sighing)

Thank you.

You have done a good job.

Good evening.

That I think is enough
for tonight.

Now…

I couldn't have done this
without you, so…

What is it?

I can't accept this.

Well, you used to give me
presents all the time,

so now it's my turn.

Good morning, sir.

Congratulations.

This is truly incredible,
Miss Towler!

Well done.

Thank you.

And Henri,

it's wonderful
to have you back.

Is Mr. Grove late again?

I didn't see him
on the floor.

He's in his office,
Mr. Selfridge.

He's hardly left the building
for the last four days.

You might want to…

Come in.

(door opens)

Good morning,
Mr. Selfridge.

This is quite a transformation,
Mr. Grove.

Well, I've put some
new systems in place.

Would you be
interested

if I were
to show them to you?

Go on.

Right.

Every member of staff
is now catalogued

in this filing system.

Each one has a card

which I will keep
regularly updated.

On it will be a record
of their past employment,

their present position

and any other pertinent
biographical facts.

Efficiency and order.

Exactly what we need.

I've also begun an analysis
on staff age.

It's highlighted
something.

80% of our male staff

are eligible
to join the Army.

I'll keep this.

Well done, Mr. Grove.

Carry on the good work.

(musicians tuning)

It's lovely to meet you.

Anything to say for the papers,
Mrs. Selfridge?

Only that I'm very proud
of my husband.

This is a wonderful
exhibition

and I'm very much
looking forward

to meeting Mr. Churchill.

Harry!

You made it.

I wouldn't have missed this
for anything.

And how wonderful to see you
in the store again, Henri.

I behaved very badly
towards you.

Am I forgiven?

Of course you are.

Excuse me.

Harry, this is very
patriotic.

You've captured the mood
of the nation, as you always do.

Thank you so much.

Lord Loxley, can I speak
to you for a moment?

These are leather manufacturers
from all over Britain.

I've listed them
in order of preference.

These companies
are first rate.

These, you stay clear of.

These are shoddy
and not to be trusted.

Thank you, Selfridge.

This is just what I needed.

Let me know
how you get on with it.

Will do.

REPORTER: What's happening, Mr.
Crabb?

Any news?

Are we going to be here
all day, Mr. Selfridge?

Any idea what's happening?

Mr. Churchill
will be here soon.

(elevator bell rings)

(whispering)

(clears throat)

Ladies and gentlemen,

Mr. Churchill
won't be coming in today.

(staff sighs
with disappointment)

Germany has declared war
on France and invaded Belgium.

(staff murmuring)

The great
British Empire…

This map will not look the same,
I think, for much longer.

You may be right.

Come on.

Time for a drink.

Mr. Selfridge.

Mr. Leclair, welcome.

Thank you.

SELFRIDGE:
Miss Day,

I hear Rose has been
talking to you

about going
into business.

Oh, the club.

No, I couldn't take
Rose's money.

I appreciate that.

You're not at all
as I expected, Miss Day.

I'm not sure
whether to take that

as a compliment or not.

Well, you should--
it was meant as one.

We should start again.

As friends.

That's a lovely idea.

To my Creative Director.

No, Harry, it can't be
like it was before.

Why not?

I'll give you an overview
of the whole store.

We can work together
like we used to.

I said I would just stay
for the exhibition.

I have other business
to settle in London.

SELFRIDGE:
Like what?

Trust me.

It wouldn't be good
for you or me if I stayed.

DELPHINE:
Everybody!

News from the Palace!

It's finally come.

We're going to war.

(crowd murmuring)

♪ Rule, Britannia!
Britannia, rule the waves J"

J" Britons never, never,
never shall be slaves J"

♪ Rule, Britannia!
Britannia, rule the waves J"

J" Britons never, never,
never shall be slaves. J"

(cheering)