Gunsmoke (1955–1975): Season 1, Episode 18 - Yorky - full transcript

A young white boy, taken hostage years earlier by the Pawnee, must steal from or kill a white in order to be accepted by the tribe as a brave.

ANNOUNCER:

Starring James Arness
as Matt Dillon.

Out here on the frontier,
few people care how a man dies



or for what reason.

But I do.

My name's Dillon,
U.S. marshal.

With headquarters
over there in Dodge City.

No man's life is worthless.

And yet,
the killing goes on.

And the number of graves
here on Boot Hill increases.

All kinds lie here.

Good and bad together.

While the frontier grows west.

Shut up, Rogue.

Little dog ain't no account.



Makes all his bark
when it's too late.

Wait.

He might be playin' possum.

I'd have swore
you hit him, Pa.

Looks like I hit him
all right.

Blood. Lots of it.

Arapaho?

No.

Arapahos would've sent
50 braves after us.

This looks like some kid
who's trying to count a coup.

Well, don't an Injun have
to take a scalp to count a coup?

Stealin' a horse is
about as good,

especially for a young one.

But this one'll never wear
the eagle's feather.

He'll be bled white by sunup.

I reckon this is
where the marshal stays.

Yeah, reckon it is.

You reckon
I could see him?

Mm-hm.

I reckon you could.

Got a visitor,
Mr. Dillon.

Mr. Dillon?

You can just go right on in.

Thank you.

Oh, boy.

Looks like I got spring fever
in the middle of October.

Come on in and sit down.

I'm sorry to disturb you,
marshal.

What's the trouble?

My name's Seldon.

Got a farm on the south fork
of the Solomon.

Now, you're not very near home,
are you, Mr. Seldon?

I figured you could help me.

Sit down.

How can I help you?

Three days ago,

I seen this paint horse
standing by the spring.

No saddle.
Indian pony.

Just a rope around its jaw.

You know?

Go on.

Well,

there was boy tied
to the end of that rope.

Been shot in the leg.

Fainted.
Lost too much blood.

I brought him in

and doctored to him
best I could.

He come around after a while.

Well, how old was the boy?

About 14.

But he was awful wild.

Minute I turned my back,

he tried to kill me
with his knife.

I just can't keep him,
marshal.

Why don't you turn him over
to a reservation somewhere?

They'd never take him.

Why not?

He ain't really an Indian.

He's a white boy.

What?

When I washed the wound,

you could see it was just dirt
made him dark.

'Sides,
he speaks English pretty good.

Well, I don't know
what I can do, Mr. Seldon.

I'm hired to keep the peace,
not ride herd on orphans.

Marshal,

he said he was gonna cut off
my ears and feed 'em to the dog

if I didn't turn him loose.

Maybe you'd better
turn him loose.

Maybe.

Just don't seem fittin'.

If I let him go, he'll die.

You see, he's getting
the blood poison

in that leg now.

Why, I ain't sure he'll live,
even if he does get treated.

Well, the doc won't be back
for ten days yet.

That's why I'm here.

It's up to you, marshal.

All right.

Go, Mr. Seldon.

Martha,
this here's Marshal Dillon.

Pleased to meet you, ma'am.

Evening, marshal.

Well, where's the boy?

I locked him
in that shack.

He ain't got out,
has he?

He's got awful quiet.

White man too late
for torture.

Leg finish, I finish.

I'd like to take a look
at that leg, son.

Doesn't look like
you did much for him, Seldon.

Well, washed it
and put the bandage on

afore I come around.

Wouldn't let me touch it
after that.

Tried to bite me.

Well, he won't bite you now.

Come on, son.

Well, it wasn't in
too deep.

Torture finish.

Not yet, son.

I gotta open it up now
and let the poison out.

I guess it seems like torture,

but it's gonna help you.

Torture no help.

I finish now.

You know, it'd make things
a lot easier on both of us

if you'd stop
tryin' so hard to die.

Who shot ya?

Who shot ya?!

Don't know.

What were you doing?

After horses.

Where?

Torture finish.

All the poison's comin' out.

You'll feel better
in a minute.

Feel better now.

You fix leg?

Fix it?

He saved your life.

Should heal up
in about a week or so,

if you take it easy.

You have strong medicine.

Sharp knife's
the best medicine there is

for a bullet wound
like yours.

Why you save Indian?

Arapahos don't care
if prisoner die.

Well, you're not a prisoner,
son.

And I'm not an Arapaho.

What's your name?

Yorky.

Where's your folks?

Arapahos say
killed in raid.

Do you remember 'em?

No.

He speaks pretty good English
when he wants to.

Yes, he does.

Standing Bear
make me talk every day.

He say it good for Indian
speak white man tongue.

If you learn talk of snake,

you know where he strike.

Yeah, but you're a white man,
Yorky.

Arapaho.

I go back to tribe
when I make big coup.

If I come back
with scalp and horses,

I become warrior.

You're not gonna take
any scalps,

and you're not gonna steal
any horses.

You're gonna go to sleep.

You mean, he don't remember
nothin' 'bout his kinfolk?

Nothin', Chester.
Aw, poor kid.

Yeah, ridin' double all that way
didn't help him either.

Chester, put him in bed,
will you?

I'll find him something to eat.

All right, sir.

Come on.

Let's go.

Over here.

Don't worry, son.
We'll take care of you.

Hey, Injun.

Supper's ready.

Leg move pretty good
after three days.

Stay up now.

No, you're gonna stay in bed
two more days.

Oh, I think he can
probably get up now, Chester,

if he takes it easy.

Well, if you say so,
Mr. Dillon,

but my ma always said
the best thing for healing

was a pure heart

and a lot of sleep.

All right.

But if he starts
movin' around too much,

put him back to bed.

All right, sir.

Mr. Dillon save my life.

He sure did.

If he hadn't taken
that bullet out,

you'd had to cut your leg off
up by your windpipe.

So now I count a coup for him
before I go back to tribe.

Well, I figured as to how living
a couple of months in town,

among civilized humans,

and you'd forget
all about them Arapaho.

Maybe so.

Marshal want horses?

No.

He don't want no horses.

If you wanna help him,
don't go stealin' no horses.

Get a job
and behave yourself.

That's how you count a coup
for him.

No, Yorky, you gotta forget
about them Indian tricks

and act civilized.

Yorky.

This is yours.
You might as well wear it.

How's your job at the stable?

Good.
Like work with horses.

Like work here too.

I kinda figured that when
that leg of yours healed up,

you'd be headin' back
for the Arapahos.

Not now.

Glad to hear it, Yorky.

Hey, Injun.

You'd better stop
foolin' around that sire,

up and get over to the stable.

If you're late,
ol' Moss will skin you alive.

Pretty animal,
ain't he, boy?

You gonna sell him,
Mr. Brant?

Not this one, boy.

But I'm bringing in
15 head tomorrow.

Army's contracted
for most of 'em.

But I got one
for the marshal to see.

You tell him, boy.

"You tell him, boy."

Morning, marshal.

Hello, Abe.

How are ya?

It's always a pleasure,
marshal.

How's the best bronc-buster
in Kansas?

Fine,
except I'm a little dry.

We just brought
in some stock.

All right, go ahead.

But if you take
more than one drink

afore I get there,

I'll be on you like a big dog
after a small bone.

Sit down, Abe.
Pull up a chair.

That boy.

When he gets liquored up,
he ain't no good with horses.

You sellin' this bunch
to the Army, Abe?

Sold 'em all but one.

Eight hundred
and 40 dollars worth.

Sixty dollars apiece.

Area sergeant's taking 'em out
to Fort Dodge this afternoon.

But I'm keepin' a buckskin

that I never seen
the like of.

I figured you'd like
first crack at him.

Well, I would, Abe.
Thanks for thinking of me.

Marshal, a month ago
some Injun kid tried

to steal my horses,
and I shot him.

Think I killed him.

I figured it was just some kid
trying to steal some horse

to count a coup.

I wanted to find out
if other folks

around here been
havin' Injun trouble.

There's no reports, Abe.

Well, now.

That makes a man consider things
mighty carefully.

I'll go get Tom.

Care to have a drink?

No, no, thanks, Abe.
I'll see you down at the corral.

Wanna take a look
at that buckskin.

I'll be there.

All right, Abe.

Yorky.

What'd you wanna steal
his horses for, son?

I follow horses' track
from reservation.

Horses stolen
while I was guard.

He kill other boy
on guard.

That red horse he ride
belong to Standing Bear.

Come on down to the corral,
Yorky.

I want you to see a buckskin.

You sure?

Sure.

Sixteen horses stole.

Fifteen here.
Big man ride one.

Buckskin belong to me.

Keep out of this, Yorky.

Pretty, ain't they,
marshal?

They sure are.

But that buckskin,

he's the best of them all.

Let you have
the buckskin for $70.

I'd call that reasonable.

Come on.

Come on.

Where's your saddle?

In the stable.

Where'd you get him?

All up in Cheyenne country.

Who from, Abe?

Why?

'Cause I wanna know.

You're mighty curious
for an old friend.

I'm not askin' as a friend.

Now, where's the bill of sale
for these horses?

There ain't none.

You took 'em from the Arapahos,
didn't you?

I fought Indians all my life.

They killed my friends.

They stole my horses,
they robbed my traps.

Course I stole these horses.

Isn't another man
in the territory could do it.

Isn't another man
in the territory

with better reason.

The Arapahos are
on a federal reservation, Abe.

And it's my job to see
that they get their horses back

and that you get a trial.

You'd come after me?

Wherever you go.

Now, I'll send Tom and Yorky

back with the horses,
and you'll have to stand trial.

Stand trial for what?

Stealin' horses
or killin' Injuns?

Get down from there, Abe.

Better keep still,
Mr. Dillon.

Ride out, Pa.

Unbuckle your belt
and drop it.

I'm not sending
these horses back,

and I'm not standin' trial.

And you're not comin'
after me, marshal.

You can't kill him, Pa.

It ain't right.
He's our friend.

I ain't gonna hang
for no friendship.

Now, open that gate
and get me a horse.

Why, you can't!

He's dead, ain't he?

You gonna want me?

At the inquest.

Bury him
out in the open somewheres.

Will you, marshal?

Eight hundred
and 40 dollars, sergeant.

It's all here.

Thank you, marshal.
You have the horses?

Yeah, we got the horses.

I'm gonna return 'em
to Standing Bear tomorrow.

All right, marshal.

You're wrong, Mr. Dillon.

Them horses
already been returned.

Moss said Yorky pulled out
with 'em at sunlight.

You think he'll come back?

No, Mr. Dillon,
I don't.

Neither do I.

He's going back to his tribe
as a warrior.

Made his coup
and got the horses.

Well, not all of 'em.

He left the buckskin
in the corral.

With your saddle on him.

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