Smiley's People (1982): Season 1, Episode 4 - Episode #1.4 - full transcript

George travels to West Germany to make contact with Otto Leipzig. He starts by visiting the owner of a sex club, Claus Kretchmar. A friend of Otto's for many years, Kretchmar was often used as the intermediary when the Circus wanted to get in touch with Otto. It quickly becomes obvious to Smiley that the photo the General was so excited about was taken in the night club. He also assumes there is more information, taped conversations perhaps, but Kretchmar claims to have nothing. Smiley sets off to a holiday camp to find Otto. There he sees the extent to which the Soviets will go to keep Otto's information secret. He also finds the key to the information that Otto had left behind for him. George travels to Paris to arrange for Madame Ostrakova's protection and enlists the assistance of Peter Guillam, now assigned to the Embassy.

( horn sounding )

Herr Leipzig!

( window opens )

I'm... I'm sorry.

I was looking for Herr Leipzig.

It's rather
important.

Not here.

( couple conversing quietly )

Not here.

No money.

Nobody has money.



How long since you saw him?

Thursday.

Five days ago.

Thursday.

I've got good news for him.

Money.

Pinke, pinke.

All for Otto.

( couple conversing quietly )

My friend says don't
give it to him

or Otto will come back
and move us out

and we have nowhere
to make love.

Where can I find him?

Do you know?



Try the water camp.

Two kilometers
along the main road,

over the railway

and past the windmill,
then right.

Yes, right.

Keep right until
you come to the lake.

What is the place called?

It has no name.

It's just a place.

Ask for holiday
houses to let

and then drive
to the boats.

Ask for Walther.

If Otto is around,

Walther will know
where to find him.

Thank you.

Walther knows
everything.

He's like
a professor.

He's a bad
professor.

Walther bad man.

WOMAN:
Are you a professor, too?

No, uh, no, unfortunately not.

( muttering ):
Then Otto is
twice lucky

for a change.

What was that?

I said, "Then Otto
is twice lucky

for a change."

Why?

Why is he twice lucky?

Last week the
unexpected visit

from the East

and today
the money.

Otto is a Sunday's child
for once, that's all.

Visitor?

Who was
the visitor?

From the East.

Not his brother, was it?

A small chap.

Spectacles
like mine.

No.

No, a big fellow
with a chauffeur.

Rich.

Then I don't know him.

Otto's brother was
certainly never rich.

Unless he was the chauffeur,
of course.

Are you Walther?

I'm looking for
Otto Leipzig.

They told me at the wharf
I might find him here.

MAN:
Isadora.

SMILEY:
How do I get to him?

If you want him, call him.

Otto!

Otto!

MAN:
Call again!

Keep calling if you want him.

Is he in there or not?

I said,
"Is he there?"

Did you see him go aboard?

The wild pig comes and goes.

What the hell do I care?

So when did he come last?

I'm looking for Otto Leipzig.

Can anyone tell me, please,
whether he's around?

Is there anybody
onboard the Isadora?

WOMAN:
You should see his car.

They took it to the wood.

Who did?

Who took it?

Come far?

I'm a friend of his.

( soft music and static
coming from radio )

Drunk, hmm?

Sleeping it off?

It was a party--
music, singing.

They warned us
it would be loud.

Maybe they quarreled.

So what?

Lots of people quarrel.

They make some noise,
play some music.

We are musical
people here.

WOMAN:
They were police.

When police go about
their business,

it is the duty of
the citizen to keep
his trap shut.

Show me his car.

( child squealing )

He was scum.

They all are.

Look at them-- Polacks,
criminals, subhumans.

( dog barking )

I'll do it.

( car starts; banging on car )

( knocks on window )

What do you want?

I am so extremely sensitive
to pain.

( man laughing )

( engine revving )

( laughing )

( revving continues )

( dog barking )

WOMAN ( beyond door ):
Yes? What do you want?

( man replying quietly )

No, she's not there.

She's on holiday.

( man speaking quietly )

OSTRAKOVA:
Oh, no!

Oh, my God!

OSTRAKOVA:
Oh, my God!

WOMAN ( beyond door ):
She has friends in Marseilles.

You hear me?

Cousins.

Ever since
her husband died...

( doorbell rings )

( woman continues speaking
in hallway )

You think I have
nothing better
to do all day

than lie on behalf
of my lodgers?

She is in
Marseilles!

She went to be
with children.

( doorbell rings )

( pounding on door )

You don't think
it's natural

to want to be
with children?

Poshli.

Nichego zdes
ne zdelayut.

Khorosho.

Poshli, poshli.

( sighs )

( bell tolling )

( jazz playing )

( rings doorbell )

Who is this, then?

Who is this nice surprise?

Here is the Family Kretzschmar
going about its pleasures.

What can we do
for you, sir?

I have to speak
to Herr Kretzschmar.

But Clauschen does
no business in daytime.

Kindly tell your husband
this is not business,

this is friendship.

But how can it be friendship
when I don't know your name.

Go look after
the cooking.

Otto Leipzig
is dead.

Two men killed him
at the water camp.

( sobbing )

He asked you to look
after the product

of his blackmail
operation--

the tapes,
whatever there is.

I assume you also
have the letter

which you received on
his behalf from London.

( sobbing ):
Who killed him?

Herr Max, I ask you
as his friend,
his comrade,

who killed him?

I demand to know.

This is what you
expected me to have
on me last night.

( sighs deeply )

He called it
his Moscow Rules.

Both he and the General
insisted on it,

though it struck me
as... as ridiculous.

You have the other half
of the card?

Naturally.

Then make the match
and give me
the material.

I shall use it exactly
as Otto would have wished.

You promise this?

Yes.

And the killers?

What will you do with them?

Most likely they are already
safe across the water.

They only had a few
kilometers to drive.

Then what good
is the material?

The material is
an embarrassment

to the man
who sent the killers.

Will it kill him also?

It will do worse
than kill him.

What happens now?

I shall take these
to the people for whom
he intended them.

I will accompany you,
permit me.

Thank you,
there's no need.

Herr Max, you
are in danger!

I should like
a bag of some kind.

Can you provide one?

If you need anything,
just tell me--

tomorrow,
ten years from now.

I have my people.

These are
violent times.

I should like
you to telephone
the airport for me.

Will you do that?

Of course, naturally,
as you wish-- anything.

Well, write it down.

Yes.

Make a reservation
for Mr. G. Standfast

on the next available
flight to London.

Use your influence--
say it's urgent.

You're a wanted man.

People will
look for you.

Yes, they will.

( knock at door )

Who is it? Who is there?!

Who is there?!

CONCIERGE ( outside ):
I told the others

you were in Marseille,
but you are ill.

One cannot say this to the
whole world-- it's not right!

You understand,
one has responsibilities

to the other tenants, you hear?

You hear?

Madame!

She is there.

Madame, you are there?

Madame Ostrakova!

Madame!

He is a doctor.

Listen to me.

Tell her!

No-- I am not a doctor.

I am a friend
of General Vladimir.

SMILEY:
Trust me, madame.

I am here to help you.

No, no,
let us.

Let us.

Be quiet.

Madame.

You are going away
for a short holiday.

You will have to put
yourself in my hands.

Now, will you
do that?

You must be ready
to leave in an hour.

Madame La Pierre will
fetch whatever you want

from your apartment.

There'll be plenty
of time to talk later.

Alone.

Why don't you have
a little lie-down?

Say, Guillam.

Shove that thing
round the back, will you?

Ambassador will go raving mad

if he sees a foreign car
in the car park.

Bad for trade.

Doesn't like sports
coats too much either,
to be frank.

Morning!

Morning.

( phone rings )

Stango...

I'm out.

( phone continues ringing )

Hello.

Yes?

One moment, please.

It's a Mr. Barraclough
for you, sir.

Says you'll
remember him.

Yes, of course I remember you,
Mr. Barraclough.

I'm so glad.

Then you probably remember

a little removals job
we once did together

on a friend's house in Helsinki,
some few years back.

That's right.

To help him out.

I want you to arrange
a repeat performance for me.

Yes, here.

Now.

Can you manage that?

Let me give you
the address, then.

Have you gone mad?

( inaudible )

( inaudible )

Oh, you are
so very kind,

really, monsieur.

Felix is
completely overcome.

No, you are too kind!

He never dreamed...

See, Madame,

is he not
beautiful?

Like a Cossack.

Better than a Cossack.

( siren wailing outside )

Our transport is
due any moment.

Please stand by,
madame.

( siren wailing )

POLICEMAN:
You-- where
you are going?!

Press.

( sirens continue wailing )

( whistle blows )

What a perfectly
revolting little car.

How ever
will we fit in?

GUILLAM:
It's bloody
typical of London,

not telling me
you were out here.

I mean, that's just par
for the course these days.

I usually pick it up
from the Queen's Messengers

six weeks after the event.

Not like
in your day.

I'm sorry to have
to tell you, Peter,

I'm working
on my own these days.

Bloody hell, George!

I must say you put a strain
on friendship, you do.

You mean I called out the entire
emergency service of Paris

to assist you in a piece
of private enterprise?

Find a phone box.

Ring your wife.

If there's anybody
in the house,

ask her to get rid of them.

I'm sure she's understanding.

George,
she's pregnant.

Forgive us,
madame.

You are abducting me?

Oh, no, madame.

I am a little disappointed,
monsieur.

The ambassador's going
to love this, he really is.

( tires squeal )

May I know who are my hosts?

Your witness,
George.

Your hosts
are British
diplomats, madame,

but their
hospitality is

necessarily
discreet.

I'll say so.

You said you were a friend
of General Vladimir.

He had an assistant,
little man.

He came to see me.

I called him
the magician.

What has
become of him?

I am afraid he fell

in the same battle
as the General, madame.

But he did
what he set out to do.

I promise you.

I hope that at
some convenient moment

you will allow me time
to mourn, monsieur.

SMILEY:
I don't want any of this

going by diplomatic bag.

Is Stango still
your clerk these days?

Since you ask.

Get him on
a midday plane.

Enderby can send somebody
to Heathrow to meet him.

Where's the writing paper?

Try the desk.

There was a French couple
we used to have--

she was something
in the Resistance--

owned a farmhouse
up near Arras.

The Delbarres.

Are they still
on the books?

Tell them we're
bringing them a guest.

Use a phone box.

You're very... piano, Peter.

I'm just feeling my age.

MRS. GUILLAM:
Peter,

it's the embassy.

Are you here?

No.

Stango is to take this
with him as well.

It's personal for Saul Enderby.

I want a meeting in London
tomorrow night at the latest.

He can confirm by signal.

Anything else?

Yes, there is.

How long since you had
the ferrets in?

A month.

Ring a bell?

Deafening.

Find out what's
become of him--

whether he's
still in town.

Do it before you do
anything else.

Get London to do
an all-stations trace.

Can I go now?

The sooner the better.

Meanwhile, I think I'll
take a little doze myself.

( sniffles )

Mind if I use your sofa?

You'll use Marie-Claire's car,
won't you, Peter?

What was it Goethe said?

"You must dance
but I must sleep"?

Or... was it
the other way around?

Very pretty, your wife.

How's our
other guest?

Also asleep.

Who is she?

God knows.

The ambassador's
private secretary

is looking
for you, sir,

and so is the head
of Chancery.

Just a moment.

The present count stands
at seven separate charges

submitted by
the French police

to the Protocol Department
of the Foreign Ministry

and forwarded
to the private office

for the ambassador's
gracious consideration.

They cover pretty well
everything in the book

from parking
to attempted manslaughter.

More particularly, there's
a most extraordinary request

that they be allowed
to interview you

in connection
with an elaborate hoax

played upon
the authorities.

I don't think
we'll even wait

for the frogs
to declare you
persona non grata.

I think we'll
do it ourselves.

If you want
to speak to me,

press that and wait.

GUILLAM:
Brother Saul says
to handle you

at arm's length.

How do I
do that?

Oh, you'll find a way.

You used to say when
the whistle goes, we stop play.

It was your one sporting
metaphor, as far as I remember.

The rest were beyond me.

What else
did Saul say?

He's getting his ducks in a row.

He'll phone you tomorrow.

But I asked

for a meeting tomorrow.

And Saul
says wait.

And as a matter of fact,
I work for him these days.

Aimeriez-vous
vous reposer

apr?s le petit
d?jeuner?

Et vous,
monsieur?

Merci, madame.

Il faudrait revenir
nous voir au printemps.

C'est tr?s joli ici.

Et vous, madame,
vous avez un jardin?

Yes, sir.

Whatever you say,
sir.

No, he hasn't
told me a thing.

I assume that he's
saving it for you.

All right.

He won't like it.

But I will pass it on,
of course.

The ducks are not yet
in a row.

He did, however,
use the term
"rogue elephant."

Of me?

Yes.

Un oeuf sur le plat,

oui?

Merci.

Voil?.

I wrote to him.

I had no reply.

I did not dare
approach the police.

Who are the
police today?

We should have a police
to catch the police.

Maybe they were the
police themselves.

I did not know.

I knew nothing.

I thought, "Should
I telephone?"

But the magician
had told me

whatever I do, do not
use the telephone.

And with the post,
who knows today?

Maybe the letter
had not arrived.

Maybe it had
been taken

and opened
by them.

I was one woman

in a whole world
of spies.

I was afraid.

Afraid of the night,
afraid of the day,

afraid of
fear itself.

In all my time
in Russia

with Ostrakov
and with Glikman,

I never knew
such fear.

All I ever wanted

was to have back
my child--

the child I had borne
and could not see

or speak to
or write to,

the child I
had abandoned

for the sake
of Ostrakov,

the child whose memory
burned my conscience like...

oh, like the sun...

whatever burns.

You have children,
monsieur?

Alas.

Excuse me, madame.

The big chief says
this evening at 8:00.

I'm to deliver you
bound and gagged

to the portcullis.

Is there any hope
that after all,

maybe after all,

they let my Alexandra
come to me?

No hope?

At all?

In the whole world?

Not in
the whole world.

None.

You have to live
with that.

Mm-hmm.

I had to be certain.

GUILLAM:
Enderby has also
cleared you

for the
latest word

on Oleg Kirov.

Which is?

He was recalled to the Soviet
Ministry of Foreign Affairs

at short notice in order
to take up a senior position

which had become
unexpectedly vacant.

Date?

Like two weeks
ago.

He left Paris

with all the usual
diplomatic trappings.

Hasty farewell parties, flogged
his washing machine, the lot.

Yes.

Yes, that of course is

exactly what Karla
would do, isn't it?

He would call Kirov back
on the prospect of promotion

just to make sure
he really came.

I don't know, George, do I?

I don't know
what it's about from Adam.

You mean Enderby
hasn't cleared you?

Ah.

Look, George,
what is all this?

Karla, woodshed meetings
with Enderby,

calling out the bloody cavalry
in the middle of Paris.

I mean, you of all people
running a private war

when you should be
keeping bees and...

And?

And, damn it,

looking after Ann.

You're an
institutional man,
George, remember.

And you put my first harness
on me, remember?

Now what are you
telling me?

Wake me when we get
to Calais, will you?

You know what you said
to me once?

Remind me.

"Karla isn't
fireproof

"because he's
a fanatic.

And one day," says you,
"if I have my way,

that lack of moderation
will be his downfall."

I mean, you really
got to me.

I practically
wrote it

on my
shaving mirror.

And now?

I just hope it won't be
your downfall, too.

That's all.

In my time, Peter Guillam,

I have seen Whitehall's skirts
go up and come down again.

I've listened to all
the excellent argument

for doing nothing

and reaped the consequent
frightful harvest.

I've watched people hop up
and down and call it progress.

I've seen good men go
to the wall

and the idiots get promoted
with a dazzling regularity.

All I am left with is me
and 30-odd years of cold war

without
the option.

So what does that mean
in little words?

It means
that if a rogue elephant--

to use Saul Enderby's
happy phrase--

charges at me out
of the thickets of my past

and gives me
a second shot at it,

I intend to shoot it dead,
but with the minimum of force.

Uh, Mr. Smiley, sir,
and Mr. Guillam.

George!

Thank you,
Ferguson.

You know,
his name really

is Ferguson.

I never
doubted it.

Recognize the old place, do you?

We've had it tidied up a bit
since your day.

Blew the dust out.

And you'll remember
the beautiful Molly Meakin,

I daresay.

One of your many
talented prot?g?es.

Yes... yes,
of course.

Molly is head of research.

She replaced Connie Sachs.

Our policemen get a little
younger every day, don't they?

Hello, Guillam.

( knock at door )

Over here,
Strickland.

Mr. Smiley,
sir.

How are you?

Close the door,
will you, Strickland?

So...

Captioned by
Media Access Group at WGBH
access.wgbh.org