Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (1999–…): Season 7, Episode 4 - Ripped - full transcript

When a girl is attacked, a young man is arrested. They later learn that he takes steroids which is what made him attack her. The guy turns out to be the son of a cop Stabler knows. The cop later attacks his son and it turns out he is also taking steroids. Stabler is forced to deal with issues involving his own father.

(male announcer)
In the criminal justice system,

sexually based offenses

are considered
especially heinous.

In New York City,

the dedicated detectives

who investigate
these vicious felonies

are members
of an elite squad

known as
the Special Victims Unit.

These are their stories.

Who found her?

One of our custodians
saw Pamela run out



of an empty classroom.

She say
what happened?

She won't tell us.

But whoever attacked her
ripped her clothes and hit her.

Thanks.
How's she doing?

(woman)
Vitals are stable.

No apparent fractures,
but he did a number on her face.

She may need
a few stitches.

Pamela, my name is Olivia.
I'm a detective.

Please, leave me alone.

Who attacked you?

I don't want
to talk about it.

I know
that you're scared.

It was just an argument,
okay?



Did he rape you?

I said something
nasty to him.

It's my fault.

I'll ride with her.

(man)
Detectives,

custodian said a boy
was running down the hall

just as Pamela
came out of the classroom.

He say who it was?
Didn't see his face.

But he was wearing
baseball team

practice sweats.

(man)
Come on, man.

All right.

Everybody line up
for batting team practice.

Can I help you?

Police.

Any of your players
not show up today?

No, they're all here.

Fin...

(Stabler)
Take a look
at his jersey.

Is it all right
if we talk to your pitcher?

L.T.!

Front and center.

Yes, sir.

These police officers
need a couple seconds.

What can I do
for you guys?

Tell us how that got
on your shirt.

Sure it's not
from beating the crap

out of Pamela Sawyer?

Get off me.

My Dad's a cop.

Get him up.

What's his name?

Pete Breslin.

You're Luke.

Yeah.

You know him?

His father was my radio
car partner.

[mellow rock music]

*

Did you call my dad yet?

Yeah, he's on his way.

He's gonna kill me.

Well, look,
you let me talk to him first.

I've known him
a long time.

Yeah, I sort of remember
you now.

Hey, did I--did I
do something wrong?

You beat up Pamela Sawyer.

Did she say I did that?

(Fin)
When we called you
on it,

you threw a right hook
at me,

almost knocked me on my ass.

I don't remember.

(Stabler)
What do you remember?

Um, eighth period.
Calculus.

The bell rings.
I get dressed for practice.

(Fin)
Then what?

And then I'm sitting alone
in the back of your car.

Okay. Um...

How did Pamela's blood
wind up on your shirt?

I swear, I don't know.

She does.

Oh, my God.
Is she okay?

Can I talk to her?

No, you're going to sit,

and we're gonna
sort this out.

Hey, John.

Sit with Luke here
for a few minutes, will you?

(Munch)
Right.

You should have a doctor
look at your head.

I'm okay.

You need a statement
from me?

For what?

61 on Luke
for taking a swing at you.

When's the last time
you saw that kid?

Five, six years ago.

He ever been
in trouble before?

I'll check,
but I doubt it.

His old man
would've killed him.

He's jammed up enough.

I don't need to collar him
for hitting me.

You might as well
stop asking

because I'm not going
to change my mind.

Okay. We have Luke Breslin.

Luke's here?

How'd you know?

Your blood
is on his shirt.

What's going to happen
to him?

That's up to the Assistant
District Attorney.

He's never done
anything like this.

There must be something
wrong with him.

Well, if you tell us
what he did,

maybe we can help him.

I stayed late at school
to work on a math project.

I was on my way out,

and Luke was running
down the hallway.

He was all hyped up
and weird.

He grabbed me and started
kissing me on the lips

like we're going out.

So what did you do?

I pushed him away.

He got really, really mad.

Then he pulled me
into the classroom

and ripped my shirt.

I kicked him
and he hit me in the face.

And then he just walked out.

We're best friends,
but I don't know.

Maybe I said
or did something

to lead him on.

He had no right

to attack you, Pamela.

And you need
to press charges.

He'd be kicked
out of school.

He wouldn't graduate.

What's everybody
going to say

if I do this to him?

Pamela,
you can't protect him.

[knock at door]

Her parents are here.

Detective Stabler

will be handling
the investigation.

Fin already
filled them in.

Is Pamela okay?

Well, she's a little
bruised up,

had a couple stitches,

but otherwise,
I think she's all right.

Pamela's been friends
with him since second grade.

He's always at our house.

We're like
surrogate parents to him.

How could he do this?

Did--did you arrest him?

We can't.
Pamela won't press charges.

Well, then we will.
Well, it's her choice.

The most we could
charge him with

is misdemeanor assault.

That's all?

Yeah.

It may not be worth it

to make Pamela relive
what happened at trial.

Hi, I'm Detective Benson.

Pamela's right in there.
You can see her now.

Can I talk to you
for a minute?

What the hell was that?

I'm giving them
the facts.

Luke Breslin assaulted
Pamela Sawyer.

End of story.

And I'm having a hard time
believing that.
Why?

Because he's the son
of your ex-partner?

Because he's got
some kind of memory loss.

Oh, that's convenient.

Elliot, if this was any
other kid,

there'd be
no discussion.

I left a message
for Huang.

He's gonna come in
and talk to him.

Since when do we call
the shrink

before we make the collar?

I just think
there's another explanation.

"It may not be worth it

to make Pamela relive
what happened"?

Who are you kidding?

You're trying to make this
go away.

I've known Luke
since he was a baby.

Always a sweet kid.

Elliot, you haven't
seen him

since before
he hit puberty.

And he's not so sweet
anymore.

Where are you going?

To see if Pamela's parents
had any luck

changing her mind.

Pete!

Elliot.

Man, I'm lucky
you caught this.

It's been a long time.

So where's Luke?

You didn't put him in
with the mutts.

No, he hasn't been booked.
He's not in the system.

He's in with another detective
right now.

I tried to call Lily.

Did she get another job
or something?

Uh, Lily moved out
six years ago.

Oh, I didn't know that.

Where is she?

Michigan.

She don't call.

Not even Luke.

How's Kathy and the kids?

Fine. They're all staying
with Kathy's mom.
Sorry.

Occupational hazard,
right?

So how bad is this
for Luke?

Well, the detective
he slugged

doesn't want
to collar him

and the girl's not making
a complaint.

You know, uh,

Luke keeps saying that, uh,

he doesn't remember
anything.

You interrogated him

without giving me
the courtesy

of waiting
till I got here?

I'm not trying to run a game
on your son. Come on.

Let me talk to him.

All right, look,
he's in there.

Detective's name
is John Munch.

Just tell him
who you are.

Parents tried. No dice.
Pam's not talking.

Well, there's not much
we can do

without
a complaining witness.

What evidence
have we got?

Well, the tape of the call
to 9-1-1,

photos
of Pamela's injuries,

and we will have her DNA
from the blood on Luke's shirt.

(Novak)
That's plenty.

We'll charge him
the same way

as a batterer
whose wife cooperate.

Prosecute him
without the victim.

Pamela finds out
we can do it without her,

maybe she'll change her mind,
give us a complaint.

It's an awful lot of work
for a misdemeanor.

(Benson)
She's lucky

that he didn't kill her
or disfigure her.

It shouldn't be
a misdemeanor.

I'll put it
in motion.

Get Luke

into the system now.

Elliot,
I got your message.

Thanks for coming in.
What do you think?

Well, I have to talk
to him first.

Yeah, of course.
How's it going?

Swimmingly.
Everyone's behaving.

Am I relieved?
Yeah.

Anyone is looking,

I'll be in the porcelain
reading room.

Luke, Pete Breslin.
Dr. George Huang.

He's a psychiatrist.

(Breslin)
How you doing?

Do you mind if I spend
a few moments with your son?

No. If it'll help, sure.

Come on, let's talk.

Luke told me
the same thing.

He doesn't remember.

I'm worried about him.

Pete, I gotta ask you
something.

Luke ever have a problem
with drugs?

He's a straight-A student.

He's got a 98
mile an hour fastball,

and he hits home runs.

And everybody loves him.

Sound like a kid
on drugs to you?

I gotta collar him.
Captain's orders.

He's got colleges.

Scouts from the minors
and majors looking at him.

We both know he's not going
to be doing any time on this.

He gets popped,

he's got to report it
to every school, every team.

His life is over
before it even started.

Pete, he punched a girl.
Three times.

This is serious.

Call a lawyer.

You're not
gonna do anything?

I heard what those cops did
for your daughter on a DUI.

My daughter
didn't hurt anyone.

She could've killed
someone.

And then I'd be
in the same boat as you

doing exactly what
I'm telling you to do.

Call a lawyer.

Used to give a guy
a break.

Pete, go home.

Luke's going through
the system.

I can't do anything
about it.

What are you doing?

You told the Sawyers
that Pamela's better off

not making a complaint.

Olivia tell you that?

No, Pamela's parents.

This is worse than breaking
the rules this time.

You put the entire squad's
credibility on the line.

Captain--

You did everything
you could

to get your ex-partner's
kid a pass.
Captain--

As of right this minute
you are on vacation.

Just get your ass
out of my sight

before I do something
we both regret.

I don't understand it.

I've never punched anyone
my entire life.

You know, my Dad,

he taught me to hit back

if somebody were
to swing at me first.

But Pamela wouldn't hit me
and I'm stronger than her.

Luke, are you okay?

Yeah, why?

You seem anxious.

Well, I'm sitting
in a police station

and I'm talking to a shrink

about how I don't remember

ripping my best friend's
clothes off

and slugging her
and a cop.

Yes, I'm--I'm a little
stressed out.

Okay, besides
what happened today,

have you been feeling
stressed out lately?

Not really.

You got a lot
on your plate

juggling baseball
and studying.

That's not a big deal.

How are things going
at school?
Good.

Your grades.
I have a 3.8 GPA.

How do you manage that
when you're playing baseball?

I don't know.
I stay up late.

How late?
All night if I have to.

Do you have a lot of energy?

Yeah.
Most of the time.

Do you ever have
a bad day?

Everybody does.

Like when?

Sometimes I wake up
feeling so down

I can barely get out
of bed.

Wait.

Why--why--why are you
trying to confuse me?

I'm not trying
to confuse you.

Everything's great.

School's great.
Baseball's great.

I have no idea why I punched
Pamela or the cop,

but I'm sorry, okay?

I'm sorry.

No way stress made Luke
go off like he did.

Well, his father agreed
to have him tested for drugs.

I don't think
that's what's wrong with him.

What is?

During the interview,

he was talking fast

and he described periods
of intense energy

and severe depression.

You think he's bipolar.

He's 17.

He's the right age
for the onset of symptoms.

But what about his attack
on Pamela?

Rage brought on
by a manic state.

What Luke did to Pamela
was horrible.

But if he is bipolar,
he needs to be on medication.

Thanks, Doc.

I see a psych defense coming
a mile away.

Before Novak arraigns Luke,

she's got to know

if he has a history
of blowing his stack.

Let's talk to his friends.

Start with Pamela.

(Pamela)
I've never seen Luke
get mad--ever.

Even when he should.

Why should he be mad?

His father.

Why?

Because nothing Luke does
is ever good enough for him.

Well, he bragged
about Luke to my partner.

Yeah, but when Luke
gets an A on a test,

his father says
it should've been an A-plus.

First game of the season,
Luke pitches a two-hitter.

His father says
it could've been a no-hitter.

And after Luke
had this operation,

the doctor said that if
he didn't stop playing

all year 'round,
he'd never pitch again.

How did his father react?

He blamed Luke.

Said it wouldn't
have happened

if he worked out more.

And then he gave Luke money
to join a gym.

Sure, I know Luke.
Joined just before summer.

Worked out like a fiend
until last week.

You train him?

I spotted him a few times.

Luke doesn't need
a trainer.

You ever see him
have problems with anyone?

He got into it
with one of the members.

Thought the guy
was taking too long

on the bench press.
They fight?

Luke slugged the guy.

Went to hit him again.
I jumped in. Broke it up.

Haven't seen him since.

Okay. If you think
of anything else,

give me a call.

Uh, he's got a locker.

I was gonna box up
his stuff.

Sneakers. Socks.
Shorts.

What the hell
is this?

Oh, no.

(Fin)
Deca, Depo, Andro.

Luke's on steroids,
and he's stacking.

You running
a juice bar here, buster?

That stuff
will give you pimples

and shrink your balls.

I swear I don't know
where it came from.

You better not
be lying to me.

Look, I'll cooperate
any way I can.

Somebody's selling that stuff
in my gym, I want them busted.

You let us
put a undercover in here?

I put in the undercover
request to narcotics.

They laughed.

They find something funny
about this?

It's not a priority
in the department.

Nobody
who abuses steroids

is out robbing
and killing people

to get buy money.

Yeah, they're usually Captain

of the high school
baseball team.

So Luke could've been
in a 'roid rage

when he attacked Pamela.

Absolutely.

The symptoms are
indistinguishable

from bipolar disorder.

Luke's rage was caused
by too much testosterone.

(Munch)
And the depression?

Prolonged use of steroids

shuts down your natural
production of testosterone.

Stop taking them,

you go into
a severe depression

until your hormones
start flowing again.

Pamela's lucky
he didn't go further.

Very lucky.

I once saw a guy
in a 'roid rage

open a steel door
by ripping it off its hinges

and throwing it.

Took two shotgun blasts
to stop him.

Like someone on PCP
thinks they're Superman.

(Benson)
So Luke wants to make
his dad proud.

Goes for a quick fix
so he can bulk up fast.

And why shouldn't he

when his role models
in the majors

are breaking records
using this stuff?

And Congress lets kids
buy it over the counter.

A certain senator
made a little backroom deal

with the supplement industry
to keep DHEA on the market.

They're not sending
a very good message, are they?

(Benson)
So you're sure that Luke

didn't know what he was doing
when he attacked Pamela.

With no previous history
of violent behavior,

it's likely the steroids
made him do it.

You going to invite me in?

I don't want to talk
about it, though.

You sound
like Pamela Sawyer.

And that's not why
I'm here.

Well, why are you here?

Came to apologize.

You were right
about Luke Breslin.

He's been juicing up
on steroids

for the last six months.

Pamela says it's because
of the pressure

that his father's
been putting on him.

His father know
about the drug?

No, Luke begged us
not to tell him.

Someone's got to.

Don't do it.

Calling Breslin is
only going to make it worse.

He's going to court
tomorrow.

Arraignment's first thing
in the morning.

(court clerk)
Docket ending.

497. People versus
Luke Thomas Breslin.

One count assault
in the third degree.

One count criminal possession
of a controlled substance

in the third degree.

What are you talking about?
My kid's not on drugs.

(judge)
I will have it quiet

or you will be
ejected, sir.

How does the defendant plead?

Not guilty.

(judge)
I'll hear the People.

The defendant assaulted
a classmate

and the beating
required stitches.

The police found
three different types

of anabolic steroids
in his gym locker.

Your Honor, my client
has no previous history

of violence or drug use.

No arrest record
and is not a flight risk.

His father
is a police officer

with NYPD.

We're requesting
ROR release

to his custody.

Ms. Novak?

The People
have no objection.

(judge)
The defendant is released

on his own recognizance

into the custody
of his father pending trial.

Take ten.

[bangs gavel]

[shouting]

What's going on in there?

Guy's beating up
some kid.

I'm a cop.
Go get help.

(Breslin)
You're a failure!

You can't be a man
without drugs.

Now the whole world
has to hear--

Pete, get off.

Stay out of this!

Pete, get off of him.

[grunts]

[glass shatters]

You've done
enough damage!

You stupid, stinking,

sorry piece of crap.

You're a screw-up,
a failure!

Who's the failure,
you son of a bitch?

You want some damage?

I'll show you some damage.

Hey! Hey!

Stand down.

Stand down.

Let me go. I'm a cop.

Hey, it wasn't him.
It wasn't him.

The one on the floor
was hitting the kid.

(Benson)
Elliot.

Leave me alone.

(Benson)
What happened?

I don't know.

(Hendrix)
Yeah?

Doc.

Come in.

(Hendrix)
Tell me what happened.

I just beat the hell
out of a guy.

Was he threatening you?

His son.
He was hitting his son.

One second he's got his kid
up against a wall,

and the next...
I was...

I was busting his face
wide open.

That's it?

Can you remember
anything else?

Looking in the mirror.

What did you see?

What difference
does that make?

What's wrong with me?
What's wrong with me?

What's wrong with me?

Why did you come here?

I had no place else
to go.

My Captain sent me home.
I'm lucky he didn't suspend me.

You didn't go home.

What's the point?
No one's there.

My wife left me last year.
She took the kids with her.

Why did she leave?

[Stabler laughs]

She was tired of me
being angry all the time.

[Stabler laughs]

Did you ever talk
about it?

Yeah, I went to a priest
for counseling.

Next thing I know,
she wanted out.

I did everything
that I was supposed to do.

You know, I work hard,
I got a good job.

I never cheated
on my wife.

I've lost my kids.
I've lost my children.

It wasn't supposed to happen
this way.

But it did.

What about
what happened today?

Did that make you
feel better?

What kind of question
is that?

Are you judging me?

I'm not judging you.

Don't work me like a perp.

I came here--

This was a mistake.

Where are you going?

How many times
have you thought

about eating
your gun?

Suicide's a sin.

So is divorce.

How long have you been
at SVU?

12 years.

Average tour is two.

I love my job.

What do you love
about it?

Getting justice
for the victims

and the pervs
off the street.

And I'm not burned out.

Were you burned out
on your marriage?

I told you she bailed,

not me.

If you want to cut me loose,

you know, give me a clue.

Did your Captain
give you a clue

before he cut you loose?

Only about a million times.

I just, uh, always blow it.

What can I tell you?

I, uh, don't like
being ordered around.

You don't like
being ordered around?

Why'd you become
a cop?

My father was on the job.

He must be proud of you.

He's dead.

Did he want you to go
into the family business?

Kathy was pregnant.
I needed the money.

Was it what you wanted?

What, to be a cop?
All my life.

Then why
wasn't your father proud?

I never said that.

You never answered
the question.

You're putting words
in my mouth.

Don't put words in my mouth.
I don't like it.

Did your father like
being a cop?

Yeah, until the job
screwed him. Yeah.

Screwed him? How?

It forced him to rat out
his friends

to the Knapp Commission.

So your father was isolated
as a snitch?

My father was no rat.

He never testified.

I'm surprised
he had a choice.

He didn't. They fired him.
And he lost his pension.

How did he take that?

Like it was the end
of the world.

And I'm not him.

I never said you were.

Why all these questions?

I have to know you
to help you.

What was your relationship
like with your dad?

What did you used
to do together?

Watch TV. Play ball.
Go fishing.

Anything else?

Like what?

You tell me.

He worked 4:00 to 12:00,

so we didn't spend
a lot of time together.

He never helped you
with your homework?

Once when I was
in fifth grade.

I had to make this diorama.

Do you remember those things?

The models that you put
in shoe boxes?

Sure.

It was about the Civil War.

And he told me
where to put the cannons

and the soldiers
and the trees.

Never forget it.

Did you get a good grade?

What?

Did you get a good grade?

What difference
does that make?

It's just a question.

I don't understand
what you want from me.

The truth.

I want you
to start talking.

Really talking.

What grade did you get
on the diorama?

An F.

You failed.

I didn't hand it in.

Why not?

I moved one of the trees.

And my father saw it
as I was leaving for school.

He took it out of my hands,

and he threw it on the ground
and he stomped on it.

It must've really hurt
when he did that.

He took off his belt
and he beat me with it.

[holding back tears]

Because I cried.

And only pan-pansies...

cry.

[crying]

He said I was weak.

And called me a failure.

Called me that a lot.

What did you see
in that mirror today, Elliot?

The guy my father
always saw.

You're not weak.

You're so busy being strong

and helping everyone,

you've got nothing left
for yourself.

It takes a lot more balls
to talk about your problems

than beat the hell
out of a ghost.

Pete.

Pete.

Elliot.

You hang in there.

Hang in there.

This is Detective Stabler.

Shield 6313. 10:13.

MOS shot, 202 Fieldston Avenue
in Riverdale.

I need a bus now.

Is he gonna make it?

Won't know
till we get to the E.R.

Hang on.

I can't even get that right.

What didn't
you get right, Pete?

Blowing my brains out.

Well, I'm glad you didn't.

Luke's a great kid.

It's all my fault.
[monitor beeping]

He's in cardiac arrest.

Pete, wake up for me.

Pete!

You gotta wake up.

Pete!
[monitor beeping normally]

What happened?

You left us
for a couple seconds.

How you feeling?

Like my chest
is going to explode.

What now?

Pulse is racing, 180.

Why?
I don't know.

Never seen this before.

Pete, you gotta stay
with me.

Pete? Pete!
Open your eyes.

That's it.
We're almost there.

(man)
Detective.

Bullet lodged in his skull.
Never hit the brain.

So he's going to recover?

From the gunshot wound,
yes.

But, uh, his heart,
well, that's another story.

What's wrong
with his heart?

He had a reaction
to the epinephrine

the medics gave him.

There was something else
in his system.

Like what?

My guess is steroids.

Why would you say that?

Blood work showed
his testosterone was elevated.

Look, I'll keep you posted.

Thanks, Doc.

Elliot.

Look, Captain--

We got a call
from some lawyer

who saw what happened
in the courthouse men's room.

Said you beat up
on Pete Breslin to stop him

from killing Luke.

Look, how I handled
that Luke thing,

you were right
to send me home.

I was out of control.

And I want you to know

that I'm dealing with it.

You have trouble
dealing with it,

you come to my office
or you call me.

I'd like to stay here

and talk to Pete
when he wakes up.

Okay.

Doc says Pete's
been taking steroids.

Munch and Fin
are at Breslin's house.

I'll have them look
for the drugs.

Hey.

You want a kiss
for saving my life,

you can forget about it.

I'll settle for a hug.

[clears throat]

Pete, how long
have you been taking steroids?

You remember that highway cop
last year on Staten Island?

Perp took his gun
and shot him.

Kenny Teachen. Sure.

He was my next partner
after you.

43 years old.

He got soft
and got himself killed.

I wasn't going to let that
happen to me.

Taking the 'roids to keep
your edge on the street.

You gonna tell my CO?

Pete, Crime Scene
found your stash.

There's no way
to keep that quiet.

It was bound to happen anyway
after our fight.

I knew I was going
to get fired,

lose my pension.

That's why I tried
to end it.

Pete, don't lie to me.

I'm not lying.

Why are there powder burns
on the side of your head?

Where's Luke?

He's my son.

[door opens]

Elliot.

Luke's fingerprint
is on the trigger

of Breslin's .38.
You pick him up?

Cragen wanted me to come here
and get you first.

Luke may be armed.
With what?

His father's duty weapon
is missing.

We tore the house apart.

Couldn't find it.

I've already
called the school.

Luke was absent today
and so was Pamela.

[police siren]

Benson, Stabler.
Manhattan Special Victims unit.

What's going on?

9-1-1 called
from this address.

Someone inside
with a gun.

You come with us.
You three, around back.

[knock at door]

[crying]

(Luke)
Who's out there?

Luke,
it's Elliot Stabler.

Go away.

I can't do that.

Now, I'm gonna come in there
without my weapon.

All right? Relax.

Just leave me alone.

Please, Luke,
don't do this.

Pamela, come with me
so they can talk. Okay?

I don't--I don't
want to talk anymore.

And you don't have to.

I actually came here
to apologize

for what I did
to your father.

Nothing compared
to what I did to him.

What'd you do?

After court,

my aunt took me
to her house.

But I wanted to talk
to Dad.

So you went home.

I walk in

and he lays into me
about the steroids again.

I said he can't make me
stop taking them

if he's taking them
himself.

How'd you find out?

The juice I was taking,

I stole it from his room.

I told him that.

He said I should get out.

I was so mad.

So I went,

I grabbed his old gun,

I came back
into the living room,

and I said--I said,
"Dad, look at me."

Look at me.

But he wouldn't.

And the next thing
I know,

he's lying
on the floor bleeding.

He was right.

About what?

I'm a failure.

Luke, listen to me.
You're not a failure.

I am.
I know you're scared

and you may think
this is the only way out of it,

but it's not.

Luke, it's the steroids.

When was the last time
you took them?

I took them
over a week ago.

You're going
through withdrawal.

This is why
you're so depressed.

I murdered my father.

He's alive.
Luke, he's alive.

Please don't lie to me.
I shot him in the head.

No, it grazed him.
He's gonna be okay.

There was blood
all over the floor.

Listen to me. I just talked
to him an hour ago.

He wanted me to tell you
that he's sorry.

He said all of this
is his fault.

You're the only good thing
in his life.

No. He wouldn't say that.

You'll have to take
my word for it.

Let him tell you himself.

I can see him?

He wants to see you.

Hi, Dad.

I'm sorry.

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