Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (1999–…): Season 7, Episode 12 - Infected - full transcript

When a boy shoots the man he believes killed his mother, it leads to a legal battle over gun control.

(male announcer)
In the criminal justice system,

sexually based offenses

are considered
especially heinous.

In New York City,
the dedicated detectives

who investigate
these vicious felonies

are members of an elite squad

known as
the Special Victims Unit.

These are their stories.

[laughter]

(woman)
Don't be crazy.

(man)
Oh, you make me crazy.



Oh, well,
we had a good time.

Let's just
leave it at that.

(man)
I can't.

(woman)
Oh, you know,

you need
to get dressed now and go.

(man)
Let's talk about it in bed.

(woman)
Come on, I mean it!

I told you this was
going to be the last time.

Enough! It's over!
Let's go to bed!

Let go of me!
You're hurting me!
Come on!

Get off right now!
I'm done with this!

(man)
It's not up to you!

I'm calling the cops!

(man)
Who the hell do you
think you are, bitch?



(woman)
I'm the bitch who's gonna
tell everyone what you did.

How do you like that?!

(man)
You think you can threaten me?!

[woman screams, crashing]

(woman)
Oh, my God, don't, please.
[gun cocks]

Come on, don't do this.

This isn't right.
Come on, please.

You're nothing without me,
you whore!

[crying]
Please, don't.

Ohh!

[gunshot, body falls]

Downstairs neighbor
heard a knockdown,

drag-out last night.

Came up this morning
to complain,

door was unlocked.

This is what he found.

Victim's name
is Monica Phelps.

Looks like she's been
raped and shot.

ME's in route.

[phone ringing]

Go ahead.

Just say hello.
Let them do the talking.

Hello.

Uh...

Hold on.

Washington Middle School
says Nathan Phelps is absent,

and do we know
he's not in school?

You think
he's been kidnapped?

Did you search
the apartment?

First thing.

How about the closet?

No, didn't wanna
move the body.

Bullet went
all the way through.

Nathan,
are you in there?

1, 2, 3...

Nathan!

Nathan, are you hurt?

No.

I'm Olivia.
This is Elliot.

We're police officers.

My mom...

She's dead, isn't she?

Yes, Nathan.

I'm sorry.

Come on.

Come on.

Come on.

Don't look.
Don't look. Don't look.

I don't wanna leave yet.

I don't wanna leave her
all by herself.

Okay, well, we'll wait
till they bring her down.

And I'm not staying
in some foster care.

I'm staying here.

Nathan, let's talk
about that later.

Right now, the doctor's
gonna check you out

and make sure
that you're okay.

I couldn't see the guy.

I couldn't see
what he really looked like.

(Stabler)
Nathan, you can't
worry about that now.

They were yelling,

and my mom said
she was gonna call the cops.

(Stabler)
What were they fighting about?

(Nathan)
She was trying to make him
leave.

He started hitting her.

(Benson)
Did your mom know that you were
hiding in the closet?

(Nathan)
I go there when
she's got company.

(Benson)
Did she have company a lot?

(Nathan)
Yeah.

(Stabler)
Where's your dad?

Dead.

S-s...

stabbed when I was six.

Nathan...

Do you have any family
that we can contact?

If they're close by,
we could arrange for you

to stay with them.

Can you find Aunt Gina?

Is that your mom's sister?

(Nathan)
No, I call her Aunt Gina

because she was
my mom's best friend.

She lived with us,
but then she left.

(Stabler)
So what's Gina's last name?

Arroyo.

When did she leave?

Three months ago, maybe.

But...we thought
she got locked up.

(Benson)
Do you know what for?

Crystal meth.

(Nathan)
That stuff is so bad.

Makes people crazy.

Was your mom
using it too?

[sniffs]

She kicked it before,

and promised she was
gonna stop for good!

Nathan...

There was nothing
you could do.

I used to get it for her

when she was too sick
to get it herself.

So you know where
your mom's dealer lives?

Yeah...DJ.

I hate that guy!

We need to talk
to you, DJ!

Look, man, I ain't
carryin', all right!

And you can search me!

Look what I found.

(Fin)
That's worth a few grand.

You can't pin that on me.

Yeah, but I might be able
to pin a murder on you, DJ.

A what?

The rape and murder
of Monica Phelps.

No, no, no, no.
I did not murder her!

So what should I use--
Lemony Goodness

or Mountain Stream?

Tell us where
Gina Arroyo is.

Look, man,
I don't know any Gina!

And I'd be an idiot
to kill Monica.

My best customer.

So what's a hooker doing
with enough ice

to open up
her own dealership?

Guess she had
a heavy habit.

Or maybe she was trying
to get in on your game.

That chick was working
at a hot dog stand.

She wouldn't be frying franks
if she was dealing.

Now, wasn't I helpful?

Very.

(man)
I'm sorry Monica's dead,
but I gotta tell ya,

I was gonna
fire her anyway.

Why?

She started
missing shifts,

or she'd come in
so hopped up

that I had to send her home.

This is a very
demanding job.

You gotta be sharp.

Well, has Monica had
any trouble lately?

Maybe with a boyfriend?

Doubt it.

All she cared about
was her next fix.

Uh, did she have a locker?

Yeah.

Hey...could you
take her stuff?

We need the space.

Sweater, gum,
lip gloss.

Not taking up
that much space.

Something down there.

We gotta get
in the hot dog business.

(Cragen)
How much?

15 grand.

Stolen?
Not from work.

Boss says he'd know if his
register was short 15 cents.

Well, why work
at that hot dog joint

if she had access
to all that cash?

That wasn't living money.
That was partying money.

And a hell of a lot
of tricks to turn while Nathan

hid in the closet.

Well, it had to come
from somewhere else then.

Where's the son?

(Cragen)
He's in the crib.

He wants
to stay here tonight.

I don't think spending
one night here

could do any damage.

If he feels safe,
then it might even help.

Hey, there.

[door closes]

Sorry about the PJs.

We'll go pick up your stuff
at the apartment tomorrow, okay?

There's nothing there
I want.

You're gonna send me
to a home tomorrow, aren't you?

I know it.

Nathan...I won't
send you anywhere

until you're ready to go.

Did you find Aunt Gina?

We're still looking.

But...

I couldn't find
any records about

her being arrested.

But we did find
a lot of cash

in your mom's locker
at work.

You have any idea
how it got there?

From the good people.

They give you money
if you're poor.

Is that a church?

No, they just help you.

They gave my mom money
to go to school, but...

she never went.

Well, do you know
where we could find them?

They have a office somewhere.

I just can't remember.

It's okay, Nathan.

It's okay.
You know what?

It's late.

Think you could sleep?

Sure.

You know, I could stay
if you want to.

I know sometimes it's hard
to sleep in a strange place.

No, you can go.

Okay.

Good night.

Detective Benson...

Yeah?

One time, the good people
gave my mom money

to get out of jail.

I didn't wanna tell you
'cause...

I just didn't.

That's gonna be
very helpful, Nathan.

Thank you.

Good night.

Detective Benson...

Yes, David?

You can stay if you want.

I mean, for a little while.

How about if I just stay
till you fall asleep?

Yeah, that's good.

Okay.

(Stabler)
The court record says
you bailed out Monica Phelps.

(woman)
Yes, I did bail Monica out.

She'd been doing so well,

but methamphetamine's
a tough habit to kick.

What exactly is
your relationship to her?

She was a client.

And I considered her
a friend.

A client of what?

My Salvation Charities.

We assist women in need.

Single moms,
recent parolees.

Women simply
down on their luck.

Dolores Anderson

and my husband
Ted Carthage,

who runs the foundation.

These are police.

Monica Phelps
has been killed.

(Dolores)
Oh, no.
(Ted)
Oh, my God.

What about her son?

(Benson)
He's safe.

But he said that you
gave his mother money.

I believe we paid
for her drug rehab

and got her
an education grant.

Well, she had $15,000
in a brown paper bag

when she died.

Did you give her cash?

Well, that
wasn't from us.

We'll occasionally provide
start-up funds,

but, uh, we've never
given that much to one person.

Well, we're looking
for associates

that may have
known about the money.

Do you know Gina Arroyo?

I don't recognize the name.

Are any of your clients
friends with Monica?

Candace Tanner
may be able to help.

She and Monica
were in rehab together.

Yeah...

I can't remember when
I saw Monica last.

Sorry.

(Benson)
Can you guess?

Uh...not really.

Well, Ted Carthage
from My Salvation said you--

Said you could
help us out there, Candace.

Oh, did he?
Yeah.

Uh...okay, so...

So maybe a month ago?

Monica have
any boyfriends?

Hey, why are you
in such a hurry there, huh?

You got somewhere to go,
like to your drug dealer?

Get off of me.

Your friend
was murdered.

You gonna do something
about it,

or let the same thing
happen to you?

I don't know, okay?!
God!

She wasn't
even my friend!

[cell phone rings]

Lying.

Question is, for who?

Benson.

Finally some good news!

Great, we'll be there.

Ballistics matched
the slugs from Monica

to one of the Jane Does
in the morgue.

(Stabler)
Aunt Gina.

Body was found
three months ago

dumped in Riverside Park.

Two shots, point blank,
to the chest.

Never found an ID,
no missing persons report.

And now Nathan
has someone else to mourn.

Yeah...that's Aunt Gina.

I'm very sorry, Nathan.

Nathan...

We think the same man
who killed your mom

killed Gina too.

Can you think of anybody

that both Gina and your mom
would have known?

No.

Where am I gonna go now?

Well, uh...

Do you wanna go back
to the station?

Well, then, that's
where we're gonna go.

Come on.

Her personal effects.

Clothing, jewelry,
plastic bag.

And a voucher for what was
in the plastic bag.

And what's that?

$7,000 cash.

Where the hell's
all this money coming from?

Check out
the rubber bracelet.

Psalm 38:22.

Beats me.

"Make haste to help me,
O Lord, my salvation."

"My salvation"?

Thought they
didn't know Gina.

Look how many people
we serve.

It's impossible to keep track
of everyone.

You don't keep records?

We do.
Break 'em out.

Why?

Because two people
you helped are dead.

And they both had
a lot of cash on them.

Money train starts here.

I told you, we don't
give out large sums.

So maybe they stole them.

Show us your
financial records.

So that's what
this is about.

What?

Our records are private.
You have no legal right to them.

And I am disgusted
by this witch hunt.

What are you
talking about?

Ted has dedicated his life
to helping people

others would consider trash.

Addicts, whores,
and degenerates.

And he gets nothing
in return!

Tell that
to whomever sent you.

So she's got
nothing to hide.

Nooo, not at all.

Let's subpoena her anyway.

Don't need to.
I checked the dockets.

Ted Carthage
is being investigated

by the state
attorney general.

I subpoenaed his office
for the records instead.

It's a lot less trouble.

Investigated for what?

Embezzlement and fraud.

From the charity?

No, Carthage funds every dollar
of the charity himself.

His business interests
are being investigated.

Real estate investments,
construction companies,

finance firms.

(Benson)
Must be worth millions.

Actually, it may
be worth nothing.

His partners believe
he's been shifting money

between the charity
and the businesses.

Trying to hide the fact
the money's going out.

But nothing's
coming in.

Well, we got a couple
of dead women

who came into
a lot of money.

He wrote checks to
a lot of live ones too.

(Munch)
I don't get it, Vivien.

Why Ted Carthage
give you $14,000

in 11 months?

It was a loan.

He wrote you
eight checks.

They were all loans.

For what?

Personal expenses.

Yeah, I can see that.

Nice crank bugs
on your face.

You're a pig.

You ever pay
those loans back?

Don't forget, we can check
your financial records.

I mean it was a present.

Excuse me.

Katie, we know you cashed
a check for $2,000.

We have your signature.

No, I didn't.

You're not in trouble.

We're investigating
Ted Carthage.

It's really gross.

Does it have to do
with drugs?

Katie...

Are you using crystal meth?

It's--it's not like
I'm shooting it.

You're gonna
kill yourself.

I know.

I know.
I'll stop, okay?

Did Carthage give you
the money to buy the drugs?

He gave it to me because...

I did him.

Had sex with him?

It was...
only supposed to be...oral.

But he got all pushy.

I just looked away and pretended
I was somewhere else.

Katie...

What you're describing
is rape.

No...he paid me.

The law says
that doesn't matter.

You're under the age
of consent.

Candace said he wouldn't
want to go all the way.

Liar.

Candace Tanner?

Uh-huh.

What does she have
to do with this?

She hooks us up--
gets the motel rooms and stuff.

Ted pays, like,
thousands of dollars.

But the bitch
took most of mine.

I only made 500 bucks!

Oh, Candy, you messed up...
real bad.

(Benson)
Promoting prostitution's
already hitting the big time.

But promoting sex
with a minor?

All you can prove
is Ted Carthage

paid girls to have sex
with him.

You have
nothing on my client

other than the words
of junkies.

You're pretty smart.

Taking a cut from
every girl's payday in cash,

so there's no money trail
from Carthage to you.

See, we have a witness

who'd like nothing better
than to screw you

for the 1,500 bucks
you owe her.

(lawyer)
Witness?
Or willing participant?

How much money did you make
selling those other girls?

You get sick of
selling yourself, Candy?

Shut up.

And how do you think
Ted Carthage is gonna react

when we arrest him?

You think he's gonna
go down without a fight?

Or you think he's gonna
shove all the blame on you?

So you got all this evidence.
What do you need me for?

Well, your attorney's
not altogether wrong.

The testimony
of crank addicts

against the word
of Mr. Philanthropist?

That's only gonna
take us so far.

You're gonna take us
the rest of the way.

Hey...

It's Candace.

(Carthage)
Good to hear from you.

How'd it go
with the police?

(Candace)
No problem.

I got an appointment
for you.

Repeat customer.
You'll like it.

(Carthage)
Hmm, great.

What a nice surprise.

What's your name again?

Katie.

Of course.

You know
that's my favorite name.

Yeah.

You said that before.

So...

What do you...wanna do?

Well, I, uh...

I like what you're wearing.

Thanks.

Would you like
something to drink?

No.

Do you have, like,
a fantasy...

or...whatever...

that you wanna try out?

You are just wonderful.

I'm so pleased, Katie.

This is...quite a change
from our last encounter.

Why don't you, uh,
just take your clothes off

and...we'll have ourselves
a good time.

Can I have
a good time too?

Me too.

I bet we can all
have a lot of fun.

Come on, Katie.
You did great.

Teddy, you're
under arrest.

You have the right
to remain silent.

You give up that right,
anything you say

can and will be used
against you in a court of law.

You have the right
to an attorney.

If you can't afford one,

one will be
appointed for you.

I'm confused, detectives.

You claim my client
was attempting

to have sex with a minor.

And you know this because
you can read his mind?

No, we know this
because he paid the minor

$2,000 to have sex.

(Carthage)
That's not true.

He paid Janie Myer $4,000.

Alisha Jackson got $6,500.

Lori Reeves,
payment totaling $123,000.

Lori must have
some special talents, huh?

You're intentionally
spinning this.

He's a philanthropist
giving indigent people money.

(Stabler)
Do you know how much
you've spent on them, Ted?

Have you done the math?

Hmm?

$2 million.

Huh?
$2 million worth of sex?

Hundreds of women?

I never paid anyone
for sex.

Did you use protection
every time, Mr. Carthage?

Because many of those women
are IV drug users.

Have you been tested
for Hep C, HIV?

Has your wife?
'Cause we could ask her.

I'm sorry, you're right.

That's enough, Ted.

No, no,
I need to say this.

I've...been unfaithful.
Many times.

But I never paid anyone
for sex.

They were my girlfriends.

[Stabler laughs]

Wow.

You're a busy guy, huh?

So all of
the financial transactions

that happened after the sex
were completely unrelated.

I wanted to help them.

I loved them!

Obviously these are women

who saw a weak man

and used his innate
generosity against him.

You know,
I bet that's true.

So you're a victim,
Teddy, huh?

Maybe I'm a sex addict.

Yeah, but that's not
your only problem.

Were they
your girlfriends too?

'Cause they're both
in your financial records.

Gina made six grand off you.

Monica nearly 30.

We're done.
You were used?!

You used these women's
drug addictions

to turn
them into prostitutes!

Monica Phelps threatened
to expose you,

so you killed her.

Gina do the same thing?

She was gonna destroy
everything you'd created?

This B.S. humanitarian
facade of yours?

(lawyer)
No, not another word, Ted.

You don't have proof
he murdered anyone.

How about a witness?

(Novak)
Number one.

You're nothing without me,
you whore.

Number two.

You're nothing without me,
you whore.

Three.

(man)
You're nothing without me,
you whore.

Four.

(man)
You're nothing
without me, you whore.

Number five.

(man)
You're nothing
without me, you whore.

Nathan,
do any of those voices

sound like the man
from your apartment?

I'd pick
number two or five.

And we have our answer.
Shut up.

You can only
choose one.

So would you like
to hear them again?

I--I can get it.

Number five, am I right?

I need to get
my client arraigned

so he's home by dinner.

[door opens]

Number two?
I can do it again.

It's okay.
You did very well.

Can I do it over?

No, honey, we're gonna
get the guy some other way.

But you know what?

There's an Italian restaurant
across the street.

Come on.
I'll buy you lunch.

I heard that lawyer.

He's gonna get out
by dinner.

Not if I can help it.

Nathan, I am gonna do
everything I can

to put the man that killed
your mother in jail.

Come on.
Eat something.

I know that guy.

That's one of
the good people.

Number two!

Nathan! No!

Nathan, no!

Nathan!
Nathan!

[horn honking]

Nathan,
get out of the street!

[honk]

(Nathan)
Stop! Stop!

Stop!

Nathan!

Stop!
He killed my mom!

He killed my mom!

Nathan!

Nathan! Nathan!

It's okay.

It's okay.

He recognized Carthage.

Because he's
seen him before.

Yeah,
killing his mother.

He never saw his mother's
killer--you know that, Liv.

(Benson)
Seeing him triggered
his memory.

Or he figured it out when he saw
Carthage in handcuffs

with the same attorney
from the line-up.

Look,
it doesn't matter.

Nathan picked
the wrong voice,

so any ID he makes now
is tainted.

Can't we let
a jury decide that?

No judge would ever
let this go before a jury.

We can try and keep
Carthage off the street

for statutory rape until
we can make the murder case.

Might not have to.

Shots fired
at My Salvation Charities.

Where's Nathan?

He's in the crib.

Black male youth
entered the premises

approximately
50 minutes ago.

Demanded to see
the guy in charge.

The victim
approached the subject,

who immediately shot him
twice in the chest.

Who else is inside?

Just the shooter
and the victim.

Kid let everybody else go.

Please help my husband!
He needs an ambulance!

Victim still alive?

We've been calling for him.
No answer.

Any contact
from the shooter?

Not a word.
We're prepared to go in.

Let me go.

Only if you're
armed and protected.

Nathan?

It's Detective Benson.
I'm coming in.

Nathan?

Tell me where you are.

[Nathan sobs]

[Nathan crying softly]

Nathan.

I need you to put that gun
down on the floor now.

I didn't know
what else to do.

He was alive,
and my mom was dead!

Nathan, I know.

I understand that.

But now I need you
to listen.

Okay?

You have
to give me that gun.

Nathan, I don't want anything
bad to happen to you.

He shot her!

I messed up,
and I had to fix it!

Give me that gun.

[gun rattles to floor]

She tried to give me
to a social worker.

Your mother?

I don't even care anymore.

I do.

Nathan...

Your mom
was really sick.

I would be lucky
to have a son like you.

Anybody would.

[sniffles]

Where did you get the gun?

A kid down the hall
in my building.

It was his dad's.

(Novak)
How did you find
Mr. Carthage's office?

411.

I think you can see

that we're trying
to cooperate here.

And I would hope that
in return that the People

would take
into consideration

the extenuating
circumstances.

We can't, Sophie.

Yes, you can.
You're choosing not to.

Your detectives found the gun
in Ted Carthage's desk.

Ted Carthage
murdered his mother.

My client really should
be tried as a juvenile.

The DA will only allow him
to be tried as an adult.

And I don't have a choice.

Nathan...

I told you
that we'd get him.

Why didn't you
listen to me?

I'm sorry.

Casey, can't you show
a little mercy here?

Considering everything
he's been through.

Man Two, he serves
in a juvenile facility.

I'm not enjoying this,
but mercy isn't enough.

I'll plead this out
if you give me a reason to.

Some of you might think
that Nathan Phelps

acted
out of simple vengeance.

Ted Carthage
murdered his mother,

so he murdered Ted Carthage.

That is what
the assistant district attorney

will argue.

She will tell you

that anyone who kills

out of retaliation

should go to jail.

I agree with her.

But that is not
what my client did.

Did he hate Ted Carthage?
Absolutely.

Did he kill him?
Yes.

So if not
out of retaliation,

what made Nathan do it?

This is a new study
published in Science magazine.

It found that people who have
witnessed gun violence

are twice as likely,

sometimes three times
as likely,

to commit an act of violence
themselves.

Nathan witnessed Ted Carthage
shoot his mother.

And just
as the study predicts,

he reacted with violence.

This study equates
gun violence

with an infectious disease.

Anyone exposed to it
is infected.

Now, you may not agree
or like this study.

Gun manufacturers
don't like it either.

It goes against
their mantra:

"Guns don't kill people.

People kill people."

But this study
points to something

that is almost unspeakable
in today's gun culture.

And that is that the blame
for violence

can be directly placed
on the gun.

Once you see someone
squeeze the trigger,

it's easier
to do it yourself.

Nathan saw his mother
shot to death

in front of him,

and at that moment

he contracted the disease.

It wasn't his choice,
any more that it is your choice

to catch a cold

after someone
has sneezed on you.

Violence is the disease.

Guns are the virus.

And we have an epidemic
on our hands.

(judge)
Ms. Novak, your first witness.

The people call
Detective Olivia Benson.

At any point
did Nathan Phelps

admit he shot and killed
Ted Carthage?

At the crime scene
and during the questioning.

Did he say why?

(Benson)
Nathan said
that it was his fault

that Mr. Carthage
hadn't been charged

with his mother's murder.

He said that
he had to do something.

Did Nathan
blame his actions

on seeing
his mother get shot?

Objection.
Leading the witness.

Sustained.

No further questions.

Detective...

You found Nathan
in that closet.

Yes.

What was
his emotional state?

He was traumatized.

In the course
of your investigation,

did you find any evidence
of violent behavior

in Nathan's past?

No.

Any emotional instability?

No.

You had lots of opportunity

to observe
Nathan's behavior.

You let him sleep
in the precinct.

You took him out to eat.

You got close.

Your Honor,
is there a question?

Yes, there is.

In your opinion,
Detective,

would Nathan ever have
done anything to harm anyone

had he not witnessed
his mother's shooting?

Objection...leading.

(judge)
Sustained.

No.

I don't think
that he would've.

Objection, Your Honor.
Move to strike.

(judge)
Sustained.

The jury will disregard
the witness' statement.

No further questions.

Detective Benson...

Does witnessing a murder
justify committing a murder?

It doesn't justify it.

But it might explain it.

Casey...

You here
to ambush me again?

I'm here to apologize.

You gave the jury
a reason to acquit.

I was trying
to tell the truth.

I'm sorry.

What are you gonna do?

Draft a plea bargain.

I damaged your case
that much?

You changed my mind.

And I'll bet you convinced
a juror or two.

(Novak)
Your Honor, the parties
have reached a plea bargain

in this case.

(Devere)
The defendant
will plead guilty

to one count of manslaughter
in the second degree.

I beg your pardon,
Your Honor.

Mike Geddes, representing
the Carthage family.

I'd like to be heard
in this matter.

(Novak)
The Carthage family

has no standing on this case.

[chuckles]
Well, I've got a court order

from Judge Joseph Malloy
stating otherwise.

Well, counselors, I am afraid
we are unable to continue.

I've just been handed
a restraining order

enjoining me from accepting
the defendant's plea bargain

and summoning us all
to appear in civil court.

See you in the morning.

Ted Carthage's wife
can stop your plea bargain?

No, but she can mess up
our lives for a couple of weeks.

How?

Well, Donnelly can't
take Nathan's plea

until a civil court judge
decides whether Mrs. Carthage

can block it.

[chuckles]
The lawyer's slick.

Ah, you'll beat him.

Well, Geddes cannot keep us
from filing forever.

Don't get cocky yet.

You haven't heard
who's paying his salary.

Terri Carthage?

Try the National
Gun Association.

Why would the NGA get involved
in a murder trial?

Devere said it
in her opening statement.

The gun manufacturers,

they're afraid
of the violence study

because they might
be held accountable

for children
committing murders.

Once the DA's office
bases a plea on this study,

it legitimizes the research.

People believe that gun violence
breeds more violence...

Good-bye Second Amendment.

We got bigger problems
than the right to bear arms

if the NGA successfully
stops this plea.

What's bigger than
challenging the Constitution?

You enjoy having a fully
functioning judicial system?

Do you find it useful
to put criminals in jail?

Because if this happens,

you can kiss it
all good-bye.

Come on.

If the NGA
can stop a plea,

then any
individual corporation

or special interest group with
the money and the inclination

can do the same.

And if prosecutors

lose the ability
to make plea bargains,

the legal system
comes to a grinding halt.

So what do we do?

You mean what do you do.

Your office has
the most to lose here.

You need to take
the lead on this.

Get your arguments ready.

Your Honor,
the district attorney

has the right to enter
into plea agreements

without input
from the victim's family.

Which is why Congress
is considering

amending the Constitution

to enact the Crime Victim's
Bill of Rights.

Victims' families should
have standing in plea bargains.

Mr. Geddes isn't concerned
with the rights of victims

or their families.

He's using this case to further
his employer's agenda.

The NGA's interests and
the Carthage family's interests

are one and the same.

A bogus study
is being used

to cut a murderer a deal,
and many of us--

yes, including the NGA--

take issue with that.

Well,
the NGA takes issue

with every study about guns.

These are the same people
that got Congress to kill

a multimillion-dollar
firearms research budget.

We're here to talk
about this study,

which may be biased,
inapplicable,

maybe flat-out wrong.

But we don't know,
because it hasn't been

fully vetted
by the courts.

Then let's do that.

I'm ordering
an evidentiary hearing.

You have someone that can
explain more about this study?

Yes, he's an expert
on juvenile violence.

Get your
codefendants together

and let's hear
what he's got to say.

The authors of the study

interviewed
over 1,500 children

in the Chicago area.

They also interviewed
caretakers,

and collected data
on families.

School performance,
economic standing.

Over 150 factors in all.

How many times were
the subjects interviewed?

Three times
over five years.

The goal was to determine
which of them

had witnessed or been victims
of gun violence,

and how they differed
from those subjects who had not.

What were the findings?

Those subjects that had
seen gun violence

were at least twice as likely
to commit a violent act

in the future.

It's more predictive
than poverty,

drug use, or being raised
by a single parent.

So what does this mean?

We need to look
at gun violence in a new way.

It isn't a societal problem
or a class problem.

It's a medical problem.

We need to treat it like
it's an infectious disease.

Policy makers can stop
the spread of this disease

by limiting

exposure to gun violence

and treating those who have
been exposed early on.

Thank you, Doctor.

Do you believe
there's a causal link

between witnessing
gun violence

and becoming violent,
as your study claims?

Yes.

Even though many people
witness gun violence

and do not
become violent.

You've been exposed
to many viruses in your life

without getting sick.

I thought the way
to prove cause and effect

was through
a controlled experiment.

But this study was only
a statistical analysis, right?

A controlled experiment
would require

deliberately exposing
children to gun violence.

Which, of course,
is unethical.

So they use
the second best method...

thereby obtaining
the second best results.

Perfect.

Nothing further.

You're excused,
Dr. Young.

Your Honor...

I'd like to request
that Nathan Phelps

be called to testify.

Objection, Your Honor.
Relevance.

This hearing is to examine
a scientific study.

Any testimony from Nathan Phelps
is immaterial.

I disagree.

Whether or not we believe
the study to be valid,

shouldn't we determine
at least if the boy

fits the criteria
the study set forth?

What exactly did Nathan see,
what are his motives?

Only he can answer that.

Your Honor,
the Fifth Amendment

prohibits this court...
Ask for a recess.

from compelling my client
to incriminate himself.

Recess...now.

Your Honor, may we have
10 minutes, please?

He's not testifying, period!

Let him.

And let him
incriminate himself?

Exactly.

Are you crazy?

What do you think,
counselor?

A jury's been sworn in
on the criminal case.

A witness has testified.

Do you see where
this is heading?

You gonna screw us over
on this?

Trust me.

Why did you kill
Ted Carthage?

I don't know.

Didn't he kill
your mom?

Yeah.

So are you lying when
you say you don't know?

I'm not lying.

Was your mom
a prostitute?

(Nathan)
I don't know.

(Geddes)
Did you have a nice apartment
when she was alive?

It was okay.

Was there a lot of crime
in the neighborhood?

I guess.

Did you have
a nice life, Nathan?

Yes.

Doesn't sound like it.

How old were you when
your dad was stabbed to death?

S-six.

If you could, would you shoot
the guy who stabbed your dad,

just like you shot
Ted Carthage?

No.

No?! Why not?

He stabbed your father.

I don't wanna kill anybody!

Sure, you did.
You were angry.

No!

Yeah, Ted Carthage
killed your mother.

You hated him.
Stop it!

You didn't kill because
you saw the gun.

You wanted to hurt him!

You hated him,
and you wanted him to die!

Yes, I hated him,
all right?!

Nothing further.

We have no questions
for this witness.

(judge)
Are you sure, Ms. Novak?

I am.

You're excused, son.

Your Honor, at this time,

the defense would move
for a mistrial.

Ms. Devere,
you can't do that.

This is a hearing,
not a trial.

My apologies,
Judge Malloy.

That motion wasn't
made to you.

I'm speaking
to Judge Donnelly.

Nathan Phelps
was compelled

to incriminate himself
in these proceedings.

The testimony is admissible
in his criminal trial

and violates his right
against self-incrimination.

It's grounds for a mistrial.

Motion granted.

The criminal case
against Nathan Phelps

is dismissed
with prejudice.

What?!

In that event,
Judge Malloy,

I move to dismiss
this proceeding.

Now that there is no case
against Nathan Phelps,

there is no reason
to investigate this research.

Your Honor,

this is a set-up,
perpetrated by the DA's office.

Mr. Geddes,
I'd agree with you,

except you're the one who called
Mr. Phelps to the stand.

This action is dismissed.

Court is adjourned.

[bangs gavel]

Killer got a foster family.
That's nice.

You're a jerk, Geddes.

Yeah, and you got
a murderer off.

Nathan Phelps would be
serving the sentence

I had already negotiated
had you not gotten involved.

So why don't we put the blame
where it really belongs:

on your bosses.

Casey...

You honestly believe
that guns cause a disease?

My dad had guns.

He taught me how to use them
when I was a kid.

But I never saw anyone
gunned down in front of me.

Have you?

Taking away guns isn't gonna
cure the world of violence.

Unless the study's true.

Then everything's different,
isn't it?

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