How It's Made (2001–…): Season 6, Episode 9 - Chains/Bagels/Vinyl Records #1/Vinyl Records #2 - full transcript

Uncover the manufacturing genius behind common items such as fiberglass insulation, wooden ducks, gumball machines, and exhaust systems.


CAPTIONS PAID FOR BY
DISCOVERY COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Narrator:
TODAY ON "HOW IT'S MADE"...

CHAINS...

...BAGELS...

...AND VINYL RECORDS.

CHAINS ARE
AS INDISPENSABLE TODAY

AS THEY WERE
THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO.

ANCIENT HISTORIANS REFER
TO THE USE OF METAL CHAINS

FOR JEWELRY, SHACKLES,
AND CONSTRUCTION.

TODAY, CHAINS ARE USED
FOR THOSE VERY SAME PURPOSES

AND MANY MORE.

CHAINS ARE USED
TO TIE THINGS DOWN,

HOLD THINGS TOGETHER,
AND PULL THINGS ALONG,

AND THEIR MANY SIZES
REFLECT THE VARIED USES.

TO MAKE A CHAIN, A TURNING DRUM
UNCOILS THIS WIRE ROD

AND PULLS IT THROUGH A STEEL
GUIDE RING TO A STEEL DRAW BOX.

GREASE INSIDE THE BOX
LUBRICATES THE WIRE.

ON ITS WAY OUT OF THE BOX,
THE WIRE GOES THROUGH A DIE,

SUCH AS THE ONE
BEING DEMONSTRATED HERE.

THE DIE HAS A SMALLER DIAMETER
THAN THE WIRE,

AND AS THE TURNING DRUM
PULLS IT THROUGH,

THE WIRE NARROWS, HARDENS,
AND BECOMES STRONGER.

NOW ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN TOOLS
MOVE IN FROM ALL SIDES.

THIS IS A FORMING MACHINE.

A TOOL CALLED A JAW
PROPELS THE WIRE FORWARD,

WHILE ANOTHER JAW
PUSHES ON THE WIRE,

BENDING IT AROUND A STEEL PIN.

IT FORMS A "C" SHAPE.

ANOTHER FORMING TOOL
CLOSES THE "C,"

COMPLETING ONE LINK
IN THE CHAIN,

AND THEN ANOTHER JAW
MAKES THE NEXT LINK.

THIS MACHINE
IS MAKING JACK CHAIN,

WHICH IS USUALLY USED
TO HANG LIGHTS.

ANOTHER FORMING MACHINE
MAKES A CHAIN

THAT CAN HAUL A HEAVIER LOAD.

A GRIP PULLS THE WIRE ONTO
ROLLERS THAT STRAIGHTEN IT OUT.

STEEL CUTTERS NOW MAKE NOTCHES
ON BOTH SIDES OF THE WIRE.

THESE NOTCHES MARK THE PLACE
WHERE THE WIRE

IS TO BE SLICED
INTO LINK-SIZED PIECES.

A MECHANIZED KNIFE MAKES
THE FINAL CUT AT THE NOTCHES.

NEXT, ROLLER ARMS LOOP
A CUT PIECE OF WIRE

AROUND A STEEL FINGER.

THE ROLLER ARMS
MAKE IT LOOK EASY,

BUT THEY'RE ACTUALLY EXERTING
TONS OF PRESSURE

IN ORDER TO SHAPE THIS WIRE.

AFTER THE ROLLERS FORM THE LINK,

A PLIERS-LIKE TOOL GRABS IT
AND TURNS IT AROUND.

THIS POSITIONS
THE COMPLETED LINK

SO THAT IT CAN CONNECT WITH
THE NEXT LINK AS IT'S SHAPED.

AS EACH LINK IS ADDED,

THE CHAIN DROPS INTO
A PILE BELOW THE MACHINE.

THERE ARE DOZENS
OF FORMING MACHINES

IN MOST CHAIN FACTORIES.

EACH MACHINE MAKES
50 TO 60 LINKS PER MINUTE.

THAT'S ABOUT 250 FEET OF CHAIN
PER MACHINE HOUR.

TO PUT THAT INTO PERSPECTIVE,
ONE MACHINE COULD MAKE A CHAIN

AS LONG AS THE EMPIRE STATE
BUILDING IS HIGH

IN JUST UNDER SIX HOURS.

AFTER THE CHAIN IS FORMED,
IT WILL NEED TO BE STRENGTHENED.

SO IT'S ON
TO THE WELDING MACHINE.

HAMMERS TO THE LEFT AND RIGHT
PUSH THE LINK IN,

THEN TWO COPPER BLOCKS MOVE IN
FROM THE SIDES.

THEY ACT AS ELECTRODES
AND ZAP BOTH SIDES OF THE LINK

WITH AN ELECTRICAL CURRENT.

THE CURRENT RIPPLES
THROUGH THE GAP IN THE LINK,

WHILE THE HAMMERS PUSH IT IN.

THE LINK REACHES A SCORCHING
1,700 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

THE WIRE MELTS
AND THE LINK FUSES TOGETHER.

NOW A PULLEY SYSTEM DROPS
THE FRESHLY WELDED CHAIN

INTO A HEAT-TREATING COIL.

AN ELECTRICAL CURRENT RUNS
THROUGH THE COPPER COIL,

HEATING THE CHAIN INSIDE
UNTIL IT'S ORANGE-HOT --

1,724 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

THE PULLEYS LOWER THE CHAIN
INTO A TUB OF WATER TO COOL.

THE EXTREME TEMPERATURE CHANGE

ALTERS THE MOLECULAR STRUCTURE
OF THE STEEL,

MAKING IT MUCH HARDER.

BUT THE EXPERIENCE LEAVES
THE CHAIN A BIT BRITTLE.

SO IT GOES INTO
A SECOND HEAT COIL

THAT'S NOT AS HOT
AS THE FIRST ONE

AND THEN INTO ANOTHER COOL BATH.

THIS TAKES AWAY THE BRITTLENESS

AND GIVES THE STEEL
A BIT OF STRETCH.

NOW THE ULTIMATE
STRENGTH TEST --

THIS IS THE CHAIN CALIBRATOR.

PULLEYS RUN THE CHAIN
INTO A GROOVE

THAT'S BEEN CUT INTO
A BLOCK OF STEEL.

A CLAMP ON THE LEFT
HOLDS IT IN PLACE,

WHILE THE HYDRAULICALLY POWERED
BLOCK OF STEEL

PULLS THE CHAIN TO THE RIGHT.

WILL IT BREAK OR WILL IT HOLD?

AND CAN IT HANDLE THE LOAD?

AFTER ALL, THE CHAIN IS ONLY
AS STRONG AS THE WEAKEST LINK.

Narrator: THE FIRST BAGELS
WERE CREATED IN EASTERN EUROPE

DURING THE 1600s.

EXACTLY WHY IS DEBATABLE,
BUT ONE ACCOUNT

IS THAT THEY WERE A TRIBUTE
TO THE KING OF POLAND.

THE KING WAS A MILITARY HERO
AND A GREAT HORSEMAN,

SO A BAKER SHAPED THE DOUGH
TO RESEMBLE A STIRRUP.

THE AUSTRIAN WORD FOR "STIRRUP"
SOUNDS LIKE "BAGEL."

YOU USED TO GET BAGELS
IN JUST TWO VARIETIES --

SESAME SEED OR POPPY SEED.

TODAY THEY COME IN A RAINBOW
OF FLAVORS,

FROM NINE-GRAIN TO BLUEBERRY
TO CINNAMON-RAISIN

TO WHOLE-WHEAT SESAME.

COMMERCIAL BAKERIES
MAKE THEM LIKE THIS.

THE FIRST STEP IS TO BLEND ALL
THE INGREDIENTS IN A HUGE MIXER.

THESE INCLUDE MOLASSES,
SALT, YEAST, FLOUR,

SUGAR, MALT FLOUR,
ASCORBIC ACID, AND ENZYMES.

IF NEEDED, WORKERS ALSO ADD
THE SPECIAL FLAVORINGS.

RAISINS OR BLUEBERRIES GO IN
WHEN THE MIXING'S NEARLY DONE

TO AVOID PULVERIZING THEM.

ONE BATCH OF DOUGH
WEIGHS 750 POUNDS

AND MAKES ABOUT 3,200 BAGELS.

THEY SLOWLY ADD
ABOUT 26 GALLONS OF WATER

AS THE INGREDIENTS BLEND
FOR 10 MINUTES.

THEY MONITOR THE WATER
AND AIR TEMPERATURES

SO THAT THE DOUGH REACHES
78 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

THAT'S WHEN YEAST ACTIVATES,

ENABLING THE DOUGH
TO RISE LATER ON.

WORKER USES A THERMOMETER
TO TAKE THE DOUGH'S TEMPERATURE.

TOO WARM,
THE DOUGH WILL RISE TOO QUICKLY.

TOO COLD AND THE DOUGH
WON'T RISE ENOUGH.

HERE, WORKERS CUT LARGE CHUNKS
OF DOUGH FOR RAISIN BAGELS

INTO SMALLER BLOCKS.

THEY'LL PUT THESE BLOCKS
INTO A MACHINE CALLED A DIVIDER.

THE MACHINE SQUEEZES THE DOUGH
THROUGH SMALL OPENINGS

TO CREATE DOUGHBALLS
THAT WEIGH 3.7 OUNCES,

WHICH WILL EACH BECOME
ONE BAGEL.

THE DIVIDER ALSO DISTRIBUTES
THE BALLS

INTO FOUR SINGLE FILES
AS THEY EMERGE FROM THE MACHINE

AND MOVE ALONG PLASTIC
CONVEYOR BELTS.

THEY'RE PLASTIC SO WORKERS
CAN CLEAN THEM EASILY AND OFTEN.

NEXT, A MACHINE CALLED
A BAGEL FORMER

FLATTENS THE BALLS INTO STRIPS.

THIS WAY, THE STRIPS CAN BE
CURVED INTO RINGS.

THE CURVED CONVEYOR BELT
GUIDES THE DOUGH

THROUGH A TIGHT CIRCULAR OPENING

WITH A STAINLESS-STEEL ROD
AT ITS CENTER.

THE ROD FORCES THE TWO ENDS OF
THE STRIP TO JOIN IN A CIRCLE.

THIS PROCESS HAPPENS
IN LESS THAN TWO SECONDS,

BEFORE THE DOUGH HAS A CHANCE
TO DRY OUT.

IT'S THE MOISTURE IN THE DOUGH

THAT ENABLES THE ENDS
OF THE STRIPS TO STICK TOGETHER.

THE BAGEL RINGS EMERGE
FROM THE BAGEL FORMER

ONTO ANOTHER CONVEYOR.

WORKERS THEN VISUALLY INSPECT
THE RINGS

TO ENSURE THEY CAME OUT RIGHT.

AFTER PLACING THE BAGELS
ONTO UNGREASED TRAYS,

WORKERS PUT THEM IN A LARGE ROOM
CALLED A PROOFER

FOR 90 MINUTES TO RISE.

THE PROOFER IS KEPT
AT 109 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT

WITH 80% HUMIDITY.

NEXT A WORKER PLACES THE TRAYS
ONTO A METAL CONVEYOR BELT.

THIS CONVEYOR MOVES THE BAGELS
INTO A HUGE STEAM OVEN

ABOUT THE SIZE OF A SCHOOL BUS.

STEAM MAKES THE BAGELS
CHEWY AND SHINY.

TO ENSURE THE DOUGH
DEVELOPS PROPERLY,

THEY MAINTAIN AIR TEMPERATURE
IN THE BAKERY

AT A CONSTANT
68 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

AND THERE'S NO AIR-CONDITIONING

TO ENSURE THE RIGHT
HUMIDITY LEVEL.

AFTER BAKING FOR EXACTLY
13 MINUTES

AT PRECISELY
450 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT,

THE BAGELS COME OUT
OF THE STEAM OVEN.

THEY LOST MOISTURE
DURING THE BAKING PROCESS,

SO THEY NOW WEIGH AROUND
A HALF-OUNCE LESS THAN BEFORE.

TO COOL DOWN, THE BAGELS MOVE
ALONG A WINDING CONVEYOR BELT

THAT SNAKES THROUGH 6 FLOORS
OF THIS 1.5-SQUARE-MILE BAKERY.

BAGEL-MAKING RANGES
FROM LARGE COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS

LIKE THIS ONE

TO SMALL NEIGHBORHOOD BAKERIES

THAT STILL MAKE THEM
THE OLD-FASHIONED WAY --

ROLLING AND SHAPING THE DOUGH
BY HAND

AND BAKING THEM IN A BRICK OVEN.

DURING THE 50-MINUTE JOURNEY,

THEIR TEMPERATURES DROP
TO ABOUT 98 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT,

COOL ENOUGH TO PACKAGE
IN PLASTIC BAGS LATER ON.

HERE, A WORKER INSPECTS
THE BAGELS FOR SHAPE, COLOR,

HEIGHT, AND SHINE.

TO HELP THE CONSUMER,

A MACHINE PRESLICES THE BAGELS
ALMOST IN HALF.

IT LEAVES A PORTION UNCUT

SO THE BAGEL SECTIONS
STICK TOGETHER AND STAY FRESH.

NEXT, WORKERS SEPARATE
THE BAGELS INTO GROUPS OF SIX,

PLACING THEM ALONG
ANOTHER CONVEYOR

LINED WITH TINY BRUSHES.

THESE BRUSHES
KEEP THE BAGELS UPRIGHT

AS THEY HEAD OFF FOR PACKAGING.

A MECHANICAL ARM SCOOPS
THE BAGELS ALONG,

AND ANOTHER BLOWS OPEN THE BAGS
AND INSERTS THE BAGELS.

THIS BAKERY PREPARES UP
TO 3,000 HALF-DOZEN PACKAGES

AN HOUR FOR SHIPPING,

FAST ENOUGH TO HAVE
A FRESH BAGEL

LAND ON YOUR BREAKFAST PLATE
AS SOON AS 12 HOURS LATER.

Narrator: VINYL RECORDS HAVE
AN EVER-INCREASING FOLLOWING

AMONG AUDIOPHILES, COLLECTORS,
AND DEEJAYS.

SOME SAY THEY SOUND BETTER
THAN DIGITAL CDs AND MP3s.

TO CATER TO THIS MARKET,

SOME RECORD COMPANIES ARE
RELEASING MORE MUSIC ON VINYL,

A MANUFACTURING PROCESS THAT'S
INTERESTING AND FUN TO WATCH.

THE FIRST STEP IS TO CUT
A MASTER RECORD.

THIS FLAT DISK
IS MADE OF ALUMINUM,

AND IT WILL BE THE CORE
OF THE MASTER.

THE SURFACE HAS A GRITTY TEXTURE
EARLY ON,

BUT THEY SAND IT DOWN
AND POLISH IT SMOOTH.

THEY PLACE THE ALUMINUM DISKS
ON A CONVEYOR BELT,

AND THEY RIDE TOWARDS
A DEVICE THAT WILL COAT THEM

WITH A VENEER OF LACQUER.

THE DISK ENTERS
THE CURTAIN COATER.

NITROCELLULOSE LACQUER --

A SIMILAR SUBSTANCE
TO NAIL POLISH --

OOZES OUT OF A LONG,
THIN OPENING,

FORMING A VEIL, OR CURTAIN.

AS THE DISK PASSES
THROUGH THE CURTAIN,

IT'S SLATHERED WITH THE LACQUER.

ROLLERS WITH SCRAPERS
CATCH THE RUNOFF.

THE EXCESS LACQUER THEY COLLECT
IS REUSED.

THE LACQUER STARTS TO DRY
IMMEDIATELY.

THE SOLVENTS EVAPORATE,

AND THE VENEER HARDENS
INTO A NAIL-POLISH-LIKE FINISH.

BUT LIKE ANY MANICURE JOB,
THERE ARE OFTEN FLAWS.

AT THIS INSPECTION STATION,

WORKERS SCRUTINIZE
EACH LACQUERED DISK

FOR PITS, BUMPS, OR DIRT.

EVEN A MINOR IMPERFECTION
WON'T BE TOLERATED,

SO THE REJECTION RATE IS HIGH --
ABOUT 50%.

THEY RECYCLE THE REJECTS.

THEY RIM THE GOOD MASTERS
WITH PLASTIC EDGING.

IT WILL STOP THE DISKS FROM
RUBBING TOGETHER DURING STACKING

AND DAMAGING THE FINISH.

NEXT, A WORKER HOLDS THE DISK
UNDER A HYDRAULIC PUNCHER

THAT CUTS A HOLE IN THE CENTER.

THEN, HANDLING IT CAREFULLY SO
HE DOESN'T DISTURB THE FINISH,

HE PLACES IT ON A SPINDLE.

A ROBOTIC ARM SLIDES
A PLASTIC RING DOWN THE SPINDLE,

DEPOSITING IT AROUND
THE CENTER HOLE OF THE DISK.

LIKE THE PLASTIC EDGING,

THE RING WILL ALSO SPACE
THE DISKS APART.

NOW THE MASTER DISKS ARE READY
TO TAKE A TRIP TO THE STUDIO.

THE LACQUER DISK
IS ABOUT TO BE CUT.

THE ENGINEER PLACES IT ON
THE RECORDING MACHINE

CALLED A LATHE.

HE PEELS THE PROTECTIVE RIBBING
AWAY FROM THE RIM.

HE PLACES A VACUUM LINE
AT THE CENTER,

WHICH SUCTIONS
TO THE UNDERSIDE OF THE DISK

AND HOLDS IT IN PLACE.

THE ENGINEER NOW MOVES
THE CUTTER AND A MICROSCOPE

ABOVE THE DISK.

HE LOWERS THE CUTTER
ONTO THE OUTER EDGE OF THE DISK

AND IT DOES A TEST CUT.

HE POSITIONS A MICROSCOPE
JUST ABOVE THE TEST GROOVE

AND THEN PEERS INTO IT
TO GET A GOOD LOOK AT THE CUT.

HE MAKES ADJUSTMENTS TO THE CUT,
AND THEN HE'S READY TO RECORD.

THE LATHE CUTS THE LEAD-IN
GROOVE AND THE MUSIC BEGINS.

THE SAPPHIRE-TIPPED CUTTER

ETCHES THE SOUND
INTO THE SURFACE OF THE DISK.

FROM START TO FINISH,

THE RECORDING WILL BE ONE
CONTINUOUS GROOVE IN THE RECORD.

A COMPUTER MONITORS THE CUTTING

AND ADJUSTS THE SPACING BETWEEN
THE GROOVES WHERE NEEDED.

A LITTLE VACUUM DRAWS UP SCRAP,
AS THE CUTTER CARVES THE GROOVE.

SOME BELIEVE THIS SOUND
IS WARMER

AND HAS MORE DEPTH
THAN DIGITAL RECORDINGS.

BUT MAKING MUSIC FIT
ON AN ANALOG DISK

IS SOMETIMES CHALLENGING.

TO REPRODUCE BASS, THE CUTTER
HAS TO MAKE BIG, WIDE GROOVES

THAT TAKE UP A LOT OF SPACE.

AND ALTHOUGH THE GROOVES
CAN TOUCH,

THEY CAN'T CUT ACROSS
ONE ANOTHER.

AT THE END OF THE RECORDING,

THE CUTTER LIFTS AND THE MASTER
DISK IS READY FOR INSPECTION.

IF IT'S ACCEPTABLE,

THE ENGINEER PLACES
A SLIDING PLATFORM ON IT

AND SCRIBES A UNIQUE
SERIAL NUMBER INTO THE LACQUER.

SOON, THIS MASTER DISK WILL BE
USED TO MAKE MORE RECORDS.

Narrator: THE MASTER DISK
HAS JUST BEEN CUT,

BUT THE LACQUER SURFACE
IS FAR TOO DELICATE TO PLAY.

IT'S BEEN PRODUCED SOLELY
TO ACT AS A MOLD.

IT WILL LITERALLY BE PRESSED
INTO SERVICE

TO MAKE TOUGHER VERSIONS
OF THE RECORDED GROOVES.

AND THIS WILL ENABLE
THE MANUFACTURERS

TO MAKE MANY COPIES
FROM JUST ONE.

IN THE NEXT STEP,

THEY WASH THE LACQUER DISK
WITH SOAP AND WATER.

THEY SPRAY IT WITH TIN CHLORIDE
AND LIQUID SILVER.

THE TIN CHLORIDE IS A SENSITIZER

THAT HELPS THE SILVER STICK
TO THE LACQUER.

THEY WASH AWAY LITTLE BITS
OF SILVER THAT DON'T STICK.

IN SECONDS,
ONE SIDE OF THE LACQUER

HAS BECOME A STUNNING SILVER
DISK WITH THE GROOVES INTACT.

BUT NEXT, THEY'LL ADD A DULLER
METAL TO THE SILVERED SIDE

IN ORDER
TO REALLY STIFFEN THE DISK.

THEY FASTEN IT TO A SPINDLE
ON THE UNDERSIDE OF A TANK LID.

THE DISK SPINS,
AND THEY RINSE IT ONE MORE TIME.

THE WATER IN THE TANK BELOW
IS GREEN

BECAUSE THESE NICKEL NUGGETS
ARE DISSOLVING INTO IT.

THEY LOWER THE LID

AND THE SPINNING DISK
IS IMMERSED IN THE SOLUTION.

AN ELECTRIC CHARGE FUSES
THE NICKEL TO THE SILVER...

...AND THE NICKEL SETTLES
NEATLY INTO THE GROOVES.

NOW THEY REMOVE IT
FROM THE TANK

AND PRY THE METAL LAYER AWAY

FROM THE ORIGINAL
LACQUER DISK.

THIS METAL LAYER IS A STAMPER

THAT WILL BE USED TO PRESS
VINYL RECORDS.

AND THE LACQUER DISK,
WHICH HAS SERVED AS ITS MOLD,

IS DISCARDED.

NOW THEY LOOK FOR THE EXACT
CENTER OF THE STAMPER.

A WORKER PLACES IT
UNDER THE MICROSCOPE,

WHICH IS PART
OF AN OPTICAL CENTERING PUNCH.

AS THE STAMPER DISK SPINS,

HE ALIGNS THE GROOVES
WITH A GUIDE IN THE VIEWFINDER.

WHEN HE FINDS THE CENTER,
HE PUNCHES A HOLE THERE.

NEXT, THEY CLAMP THE STAMPER
DISK INTO A TRIMMING MACHINE.

THE DISK TURNS AND A CUTTING
WHEEL TRIMS THE EDGE,

CUTTING THE STAMPER DISK
TO A DIAMETER OF 12 1/2 INCHES.

NOW THE STAMPERS ARE READY
TO MAKE THEIR MARK.

BUT FIRST THE LABELS
MUST BE PREPARED.

A PUNCH BORES INTO THE CENTER OF
A STACK OF THEM, MAKING HOLES.

THEN THEY PLACE THE LABELS
ON A MINI-PRESS.

IT RISES TO ANOTHER CUTTER,
WHICH ROUNDS THEM OUT.

THEY POUR BLACK POLYVINYL
CHLORIDE PELLETS INTO A HOPPER.

THE PELLETS FALL
INTO AN EXTRUDER,

WHICH TURNS THEM INTO HOT
RUBBERY PADDIES CALLED BISCUITS.

HOISTS ABOVE AND BELOW

PUSH LABELS TO EACH SIDE
OF THE BISCUIT.

SUCTION CUPS HOLD THEM THERE

WHILE A CARRIAGE MOVES
THE BISCUIT FORWARD

THEN DROPS THE BISCUIT
AND LABELS IN THE PRESS.

TWO STAMPERS
MOUNTED IN THE PRESS

APPLY 100 TONS OF PRESSURE.

THE STAMPERS ARE A SEARING
380 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

THEY MELT AND MOLD THE BISCUIT
INTO A RECORD.

A QUICK COOLING CYCLE HARDENS IT

AND BONDS THE LABELS
TO THE VINYL.

A CARRIAGE THEN TRANSPORTS IT
TO A TRIMMING TABLE.

THE TABLE SPINS THE RECORD
AGAINST A KNIFE

AS IT CUTS AWAY
THE RAGGED EDGES.

THEN, THE TABLE TAKES
THE TRIMMED RECORD

TO THE FINISHED STACK.

AND THE PROCESS BEGINS AGAIN.

THIS IS REALLY

A WELL-CHOREOGRAPHED
MUSICAL PRODUCTION.

AS ONE RECORD IS LIFTED OUT
OF THE PRESS,

THE NEXT ONE GOES IN.

THE PRESSING AND TRIMMING
OF A VINYL RECORD

TAKES JUST 28 SECONDS.

BUT IT'S SURE TO GET HOURS
OF PLAY BY ENTHUSIASTS

WHO REFUSE TO BUY INTO
THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION

AND STILL BELIEVE THAT VINYL
IS A CUT ABOVE.

IF YOU HAVE ANY COMMENTS
ABOUT THE SHOW,

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TOPICS FOR FUTURE SHOWS,

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