How It's Made (2001–…): Season 6, Episode 3 - Ropes/Billiard Tables/Sailboards/Cymbals - full transcript

Find out how ropes, billiard tables, sailboards, and cymbals are constructed.


Narrator:
TODAY ON "HOW IT'S MADE"...

...ROPES...

...BILLIARD TABLES...

...SAILBOARDS...

...AND CYMBALS.

YEARS AGO, MAKING ROPE
WAS A TIME-CONSUMING PROCESS.

THEY STRETCHED YARN
700 TO 1,000 FEET --

SOMETIMES DOWN ALLEYS --

AND SECURED IT ON HOOKS.

THEN, THEY TURNED WHEELS
TO ROTATE THE HOOKS,

TWISTING THE YARN INTO ROPE.

THIS TECHNIQUE WAS CALLED
A ROPE WALK.

LUCKILY, TODAY, WE HAVE MACHINES
TO DO ALL THE WORK FOR US.

THESE ROPES ARE MADE FROM
THOUSANDS OF NYLON FIBERS

THAT ARE FINER THAN HUMAN HAIR
BUT STRONGER.

TO MAKE ROPE, YARNS WIND
AROUND ALUMINUM CYLINDERS

PULLED BY A TURNING SPOOL
DOWN THE LINE.

THEN, THREE AT A TIME, THE YARNS
ROLL OVER ANOTHER SPOOL

THAT APPLIES A PROTECTIVE
COATING OF URETHANE.

THEY FUNNEL THROUGH
A DISTRIBUTION PLATE

THAT HOLDS THEM EVENLY APART.

THIS ENSURES
THEY'RE AT AN EVEN TENSION

AS A ROCKING SPOOL TWISTS THEM
INTO ONE LARGER YARN.

THIS MACHINE IS CALLED
THE WHIRLWIND.

IT TWISTS THE YARN

AND THEN WINDS IT ONTO
A TAKE-UP SPOOL INSIDE.

A LITTLE ARM
MOVES BACK AND FORTH,

GUIDING THE YARN SO IT
WINDS EVENLY ONTO THE SPOOL.

THIS IS CORE YARN, AND IT WILL
BE USED TO MAKE OTHER ROPE.

NOW DOZENS OF SPOOLS OF NYLON
FIBER UNWIND AT THE SAME TIME

TO MAKE JACKETS TO PROTECT
THE CORE YARNS.

THE FIBERS TRAVEL SEVERAL FEET
OVER A NETWORK OF ROLLERS

THAT ACT AS GUIDES
AND CONTROL TENSION

ON EACH INDIVIDUAL FIBER.

THEY PASS THROUGH
DISTRIBUTION PLATES

AS TURNING BOBBINS BELOW
TWIST THE FIBERS INTO YARN.

A PLATFORM MOVES UP AND DOWN

TO EVENLY WIND THE YARN
ONTO THE BOBBIN.

THEY PLACE 48 OF THESE BOBBINS
ON THE MAYPOLE MACHINE --

SO CALLED
BECAUSE THE BRAIDING ACTION

RESEMBLES A DANCE AROUND
A TRADITIONAL MAYPOLE.

THE BOBBINS SPIN AND ZIGZAG
AROUND EACH OTHER

AS THE MACHINE PULLS CORE YARN
UP THROUGH THE CENTER.

HERE, YOU CAN SEE THE ROPE BEING
BRAIDED AROUND THE CORE YARN

AS IT'S PULLED UP THROUGH A DIE.

THIS IS THE BRAIDING ACTION
IN SLOW MOTION.

IT PRODUCES A MOUNTAIN-CLIMBING
ROPE -- STRONG YET STRETCHY

BECAUSE OF THE TWIST
IN THE CORE OF THE ROPE.

THE ROPE WINDS ONTO THE WHEEL
AS IT PULLS IT UPWARDS.

THEN IT SPILLS INTO A BASKET.

A WORKER PULLS OUT A SAMPLE ROPE

TO CHECKS ITS FLEXIBILITY
AND STRENGTH.

HE BENDS IT TO MAKE SURE
IT WILL KNOT EASILY.

NOW ANOTHER MAYPOLE BRAIDER
WEAVES A SYNTHETIC ROPE

THAT'S STRONGER THAN STEEL
YET LIGHTWEIGHT AND FLEXIBLE.

THAT'S BECAUSE THE STRANDS
AT THE CORE

ARE BRAIDED
WITH A MATERIAL CALLED

ULTRA-HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT
POLYETHYLENE.

IT'S A HIGH-PERFORMANCE
THERMOPLASTIC.

THIS ROPE WILL BE USED
FOR ADVANCED YACHTING.

A PULLEY DRAWS THIS HIGH-TECH
ROPE THROUGH SOME METAL PIPES

FILLED WITH STEAM.

THIS SHRINKS THE POLYESTER
JACKET AROUND THE POWERFUL CORE

FOR A TIGHT FIT.

THESE DANCING BOBBINS
DO SOME FANCY MOVES

TO PRODUCE DIFFERENT WEAVES
AROUND CORE ROPES.

THEY DIP AROUND
AND BETWEEN EACH OTHER

IN A CHOREOGRAPHED SEQUENCE.

BUT THERE ARE NO WORRIES ABOUT
PRODUCTION HITTING A SNARL --

IF A YARN BREAKS,
THE MACHINE SIMPLY SHUTS DOWN.

IT TAKES 8-10 HOURS
TO MAKE AROUND 3,000 FEET

OF THIS LARGE UTILITY ROPE.

NOW FOR THE STRENGTH TEST.

THEY LOOP A SAMPLE PIECE OF ROPE
AROUND STEEL POSTS.

THIS ONE
IS A NYLON DOUBLE BRAID,

THE TYPE USED FOR DOCK LINES
ON BOATS.

HYDRAULIC PRESSURE
PULLS THE ROPE UPWARDS

WHILE A COMPUTERIZED GAUGE
MEASURES THE TENSION

AND DETECTS
THE BREAKING POINT.

ALMOST 20,000 POUNDS --

THAT'S THE WEIGHT
OF A KILLER WHALE.

NEEDLESS TO SAY,
THIS ROPE IS JUST FINE.

NOW FOR ANOTHER TEST --

THEY INSERT A STEEL PROBE,
KNOWN AS A FID,

INTO SOME INDUSTRIAL ROPE,

THEN PLACE THE POINTED END
INTO A HOLE.

AN ELECTRIC MOTOR
FORCES THE FID THOUGH

WHILE A GAUGE MEASURES
THE FORCE IT TAKES

FOR IT TO COMPLETELY PENETRATE
THE ROPE.

IT TOOK 10 POUNDS OF PRESSURE

TO PUSH THE PROBE
THROUGH THE ROPE,

WHICH MEANS THIS ROPE
IS FIRM YET FLEXIBLE.

AND THAT'S HOW
THIS USEFUL ITEM IS MADE.

THE GAME OF BILLIARDS HAS BEEN
AROUND IN ONE FORM OR ANOTHER

FOR NEARLY 500 YEARS.

DURING THE 19th CENTURY,

THE GAME'S RULES
AND EQUIPMENT EVOLVED

TO BASICALLY
WHAT THEY ARE TODAY.

BILLIARDS, ALSO KNOWN AS POOL,

IS PLAYED ON A SLATE TABLETOP

THAT'S USUALLY 8'3½" LONG

AND 4'7½" WIDE.

CLIENTS ORDER BILLIARD TABLES

MUCH LIKE THEY WOULD
CUSTOM-DESIGNED FURNITURE.

THEY PICK THE TABLE'S STYLE,
COLORS, THE TYPE OF WOOD,

AND ITS LACQUER AND STAIN.

THE TABLES COME IN MAPLE,
WALNUT, MAHOGANY,

CHERRY,
AND THE MOST POPULAR, OAK.

A COMPUTER-GUIDED MACHINE

SHAPES PART OF WHAT'LL BE
THE TABLE'S FRAME.

THIS MACHINE'S ROTATING HEADS
PERFORM SEVERAL DIFFERENT TASKS.

A PROFILING HEAD CARVES
THE ANGLE OF PART OF THE FRAME,

A ROUTERING HEAD CREATES
THE TABLE'S DECORATIVE GROOVES,

AND A DRILLING HEAD MAKES HOLES
FOR BOLTS TO FIT THROUGH.

SIX WOOD COMPONENTS,
CALLED RAILS,

WILL SURROUND
THE PLAYING SURFACE.

THEY HAVE
DIAMOND-SHAPED CARVINGS

THAT'LL BECOME VISUAL MARKERS
FOR THE PLAYERS.

AFTER SPRAYING THE RAILS
WITH GLUE,

A WORKER INSERTS
18 METAL NUTS.

THEY'LL BE USED LATER
TO SECURE THE RAILS

TO THE PLAYING SURFACE.

HE ATTACHES RUBBER STRIPS
ALONG THE STICKY RAILS,

WHICH ARE JUST OVER
THREE FEET LONG.

THE RUBBER WILL CUSHION THE
BALLS WHEN THEY HIT THE SIDES.

THE RAILS THEN PASS THROUGH
A PRESS TWICE

TO ENSURE THE RUBBER ADHERES.

NEXT, WORKERS MOVE THE RAILS

ALONG THIS 30-FOOT-LONG
SANDING MACHINE.

RUBBER WHEELS
GENTLY GRIP EACH RAIL

AS PRESSES RUB SANDPAPER
ALONG THE EDGE AND TOP.

THEY SKIP THE BOTTOM
BECAUSE IT'LL BE COVERED.

THEY PASS THE RAILS THROUGH
THIS SANDER SEVERAL TIMES

TO SMOOTH THEM DOWN.

TO MAKE SURE EVERYTHING FITS,

A WORKER PRE-ASSEMBLES THE FOUR
SIDES AND THE MIDDLE SECTION

OF THE FRAME'S BASE.

HE USES 20 METAL BOLTS
AND 20 NUTS TO JOIN THEM.

AND HE INSERTS
EIGHT WOODEN DOWELS

IN ORDER TO ALIGN
THE TABLE PARTS CORRECTLY.

HE STAMPS NUMBERS
ON THE FRAME SECTIONS

SO THEY CAN BE REASSEMBLED LATER

BY PAIRING THE SAME
NUMBERED PARTS TOGETHER.

NEXT, A WORKER HOT GLUES
18 ONE-INCH-LONG

MOTHER-OF-PEARL COMPONENTS
CALLED SIGHTS.

HE FITS THEM INTO
THE CARVINGS ON THE RAILS

WHICH HAVE NOW BEEN STAINED
TO THE DESIRED SHADE.

HE TAPS THEM INTO PLACE

USING A HAMMER AND A BLOCK
MADE OF SYNTHETIC RESIN.

THIS WAY HE WON'T
DAMAGE THE RAIL.

A WORKER THEN LINES THE RUBBER
PART OF THE RAIL WITH CLOTH

MADE OF WOOL AND NYLON.

HE ATTACHES IT
WITH A PLASTIC STRIP

THAT FITS OVER THE CLOTH
AND INTO A GROOVE.

HE USES A MALLET TO ENSURE
THE CLOTH IS TIGHTLY INSERTED.

THE WORKER
THEN STAPLES THE CLOTH

TO THE OTHER SIDE
OF THE RAIL.

A ZINC AND BRASS PLAQUE DISPLAYS
THE TABLE'S BRAND NAME.

AFTER SHIPPING,
WORKERS REASSEMBLE THE TABLE

IN ITS NEW HOME.

SERIAL NUMBERS ENSURE THE PARTS
BELONG TO THE SAME TABLE.

ASSEMBLY TAKES ABOUT TWO HOURS.

THEY MATCH
THE NUMBERED PARTS TOGETHER

USING UP TO 50 BOLTS
AND 50 NUTS.

THEN THEY LEVEL THE TABLE

USING METAL COMPONENTS
CALLED LEG LEVELERS

TO ADJUST THE TABLE'S HEIGHT.

IT'S LIKE STICKING A MATCHBOOK
UNDER AN UNEVEN TABLE LEG.

NOW COMES
THE REALLY HEAVY LIFTING --

WORKERS FIT THE THREE SECTIONS
OF THE TABLE'S TOP,

WHICH ARE MADE OF SLATE AND
WEIGH UP TO 300 POUNDS EACH.

SLATE WON'T DEGRADE, AND
IT WON'T BUDGE IF YOU HIT IT.

THE WORKERS USE 12 SCREWS

TO ATTACH THE SLATE SECTIONS
TO THE FRAME.

THEY LEVEL THE SECTIONS USING
WEDGE-SHAPED PLASTIC SHIMS

BETWEEN THE SLATE AND THE FRAME.

NEXT, A WORKER MELTS WAX OVER
THE CRACKS BETWEEN THE SECTIONS.

HE USES A SCRAPER TO SMOOTH OUT
THE PLAYING SURFACE.

THE REMAINING HOLES
WILL LATER BE COVERED BY RAILS.

AFTER THE WAX DRIES,

THEY COVER THE TABLE SURFACE
WITH CLOTH,

WHICH COMES
IN A VARIETY OF COLORS.

THEY CUT THE CLOTH
IN THE CORNERS

SO THERE WON'T BE ANY CREASES IN
THE LINING OF THE POCKET HOLES.

THEY STAPLE THE CLOTH TO
WOOD STRIPS UNDER THE SLATE.

A WORKER PIERCES THE CLOTH
OVER HOLES IN THE SLATE

SO HE CAN LATER
ATTACH THE RAILS.

THE SIX POCKETS
ARE SIX INCHES DEEP

AND CONSIST OF A METAL FRAME
COVERED WITH A LEATHER LATTICE.

WORKERS INSTALL 18 THREADED
METAL RODS UNDERNEATH THE RAILS.

THEN THEY FLIP THE RAIL ASSEMBLY

AND INSERT THE RODS THROUGH
PRE-MADE HOLES IN THE TABLE TOP.

THEY USE NUTS
TO SECURE THE RODS IN PLACE.

SCREWS ATTACH THE POCKETS,
AND VOILà, YOUR TABLE IS READY.

FOR PRICES RANGING BETWEEN
$1,500 AND $15,000

YOU HAVE QUITE A STYLISH GAME.

Narrator: AMERICAN NEWMAN DARBY
BUILT THE FIRST SAILBOARDS

DURING THE 1960s.

HE RIGGED A SAIL TO A MAST
ON A BOARD WITH A TAIL FIN

AND RODE THE WIND AND WAVES.

TODAY'S WINDSURFERS CAN PAY
SEVERAL THOUSAND DOLLARS

FOR THEIR HIGH-TECH GEAR.

THIS INCLUDES A SAIL,
A MAST, AND A SAILBOARD.

TO MAKE A SAILBOARD,

WORKERS START WITH
A LONG BLOCK OF STYROFOAM.

THEY ATTACH A WOOD TEMPLATE,

PUSHING NAILS THROUGH HOLES
IN THE WOOD AND INTO THE BLOCK.

USING AN ELECTRICALLY HEATED
TOOL, CALLED A HOT-WIRE,

THEY SLICE THE BLOCK ALONG
THE CURVED LINE OF THE TEMPLATE.

THE RESULT IS WHAT'S KNOWN
AS THE CORE.

THEY USE STYROFOAM BECAUSE
IT'S LIGHTWEIGHT AND BUOYANT.

NEXT, A WORKER GUIDES WHAT'S
KNOWN AS A SHAPER MACHINE.

IT OUTLINES A TEMPLATE, CALLED
A MASTERBOARD, ON THE LEFT,

WHILE A SPINDLE CUTS GROOVES
INTO THE CORE ON THE RIGHT.

THE GROOVES ARE GUIDELINES
TO CARVE THE CORE

INTO THE SHAPE
OF THE MASTERBOARD LATER ON.

THE SHAPER'S 40-POUND
COUNTERWEIGHT

LETS THE SPINDLE GENTLY HOVER
ABOVE THE CORE AS IT CUTS.

STYROFOAM DUST FLIES EVERYWHERE,

SO THE WORKER WEARS A PROTECTIVE
MASK TO AVOID INHALING IT.

A WORKER THEN
SAWS ALONG THE GROOVES

TO REVEAL THE INITIAL
SHAPE OF THE SAILBOARD.

ANOTHER WORKER
THEN SANDS DOWN THE CORE.

NEXT, HE APPLIES ALMOST
1 1/2 POUNDS OF EPOXY RESIN

ONTO CARBON FABRIC TO REINFORCE
THE MATERIAL AND MAKE IT STICKY.

ANOTHER WORKER APPLIES RESIN
ON FIBERGLASS FABRIC.

THESE STRONG, LIGHTWEIGHT
MATERIALS

ARE PART OF THE BOARD'S

FABRIC-AND-FOAM-SANDWICH
CONSTRUCTION.

THEY'LL HARDEN INSIDE MOLDS

OF THE BOARD'S
TOP AND BOTTOM SECTIONS

DURING THE CURING LATER ON.

THE WORKERS CAREFULLY SCRAPE
AWAY ABOUT 20% OF THE RESIN.

TOO MUCH AND THE BOARD
COULD CRACK DURING USE.

HERE, THE WORKER
SPREADS THICKER RESIN

ONTO A PIECE OF RIGID FOAM
THAT'S 1/8 OF AN INCH THICK.

HE PLACES IT
INTO THE BOTTOM MOLD

AND ATTACHES A HAND-SIZED
PLASTIC COMPONENT

CALLED A FIN BOX.

IT'LL HOLD THE SAILBOARD'S FIN,
WHICH HELPS THE USER STEER.

THEY ADD KEVLAR,

AN ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT
SYNTHETIC FABRIC,

AS THE FINAL OUTER LAYER
ON THE CORE'S BOTTOM SIDE.

AFTER APPLYING RESIN TO ANOTHER
PIECE OF RIGID FOAM,

A WORKER CUTS OPENINGS

THROUGH WHICH OTHER COMPONENTS
WILL LATER FIT.

THIS LAYER
IS PLACED INTO THE TOP MOLD

AND COVERED WITH MORE
CARBON FABRIC.

NEXT, A WORKER PLACES THE CORE
INTO THE BOTTOM MOLD.

HE FITS TWO PLASTIC COMPONENTS,
CALLED FOOT STRAP INSERTS,

INTO OPENINGS LINED
WITH FIBERGLASS FABRIC

TO SECURE THEM.

ANOTHER PLASTIC COMPONENT,
CALLED A MAST TRACK,

FITS THROUGH AN OPENING LINED
WITH A STRONGER CARBON FABRIC.

THE TRACK WILL LATER
ANCHOR A MAST

MEASURING UP TO 20 FEET HIGH.

STRIPS OF CARBON FABRIC
ALSO REINFORCE THE AREAS

WHERE THE WINDSURFER WILL STAND.

WORKERS JOIN THE MOLD SECTIONS

AND INSERT THE WHOLE THING
INTO A PLASTIC SACK

CALLED A VACUUM BAG.

THEY TAPE THE END SHUT BUT
LEAVE TWO SMALLER HOLES OPEN.

THEY ATTACH TWO HOSES
TO COLLARS IN THESE HOLES.

AN ELECTRIC PUMP THEN TAKES
ABOUT THREE MINUTES

TO SUCK ALL THE AIR
OUT OF THE BAG.

AS THE AIR IS REMOVED,

PRESSURE FORCES THE MOLD
SECTIONS EVEN CLOSER TOGETHER.

AFTER CURING IN AN OVEN AT 100
DEGREES FAHRENHEIT FOR 5 HOURS,

WORKERS SEPARATE
THE MOLD SECTIONS.

USING A ROTARY GRINDER,

A WORKER TRIMS AWAY
EXCESS HARDENED FABRIC

AND FOAM ALONG THE EDGE.

THE WHOLE BOARD
GOT A COAT OF PRIMER EARLIER,

BUT NOW A WORKER SANDS
THE PAINT OFF ALONG THE EDGE.

THEY PLACE A STRIP
OF CARBON FABRIC

ALL THE WAY AROUND THE EDGE

AND SECURE IT
WITH THIN PLASTIC WRAP.

AFTER MORE CURING,
THE WRAPPING IS REMOVED,

AND THE BOARD
IS SEALED FOR GOOD.

NEXT, THE SAILBOARD
GETS ANOTHER SKIN --

TWO COATS OF URETHANE PAINT.

A WORKER LOCATES
THE FOOT STRAP INSERT HOLES

AND CLEANS THEM OUT
WITH A ROUTER BIT.

HE USES A ROUTER

TO CLEAN THE INSIDE
OF THE MAST-TRACK OPENING.

AN ENORMOUS VINYL STICKER
GIVES THE BOARD ITS PERSONALITY.

A WORKER SMOOTHES AWAY
ANY AIR BUBBLES.

THEN, AFTER INSCRIBING
THE SAILBOARD'S DIMENSIONS

AND SERIAL NUMBER,
HE SIGNS THE BOARD.

FINALLY, WORKERS GLUE ON
TWO RUBBER CUSHIONS,

CALLED DECK PADS.

FOR $1,900,

YOU'VE GOT THE FOUNDATION
OF A VERY COOL GLIDING MACHINE.

Narrator: PEOPLE HAVE BEEN
CRASHING CYMBALS FOR CENTURIES.

HISTORY TELLS US THAT CYMBALS
WERE USED IN ISRAEL IN 1100 B.C.

OVER THE CENTURIES,
THE FINEST CYMBALS

HAVE BEEN MANUFACTURED IN TURKEY

WITH A SECRET METHOD
FOR BLENDING METALS.

AND THOSE TIME-HONORED
TECHNIQUES

STILL RESOUND
IN CYMBAL-MAKING TODAY.

CYMBALS PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE
IN TODAY'S MUSIC MAKING.

EACH CYMBAL
HAS ITS OWN CHARACTER,

RESULTING IN SUBTLE
DIFFERENCES IN TONE.

TO MAKE CYMBALS,
THEY START WITH CASTINGS.

IN THIS CASE THEY'RE MADE
OF A SECRET BLEND OF COPPER,

TIN, AND TRACE AMOUNTS
OF SILVER.

A WORKER SORTS THEM BY WEIGHT.

THEN A MOVING TRAY
THAT'S POWERED HYDRAULICALLY

TAKES THEM TO A ROTARY OVEN.

1,500 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT
SOFTENS THE CASTINGS,

AND THEN WORKERS SHOVEL THEM
INTO A ROLLING MILL.

IT SQUEEZES THEM BETWEEN
TWO BIG METAL CYLINDERS.

AND THE EFFECT IS THE SAME
AS ROLLING OUT PIE CRUST --

THE CASTINGS BECOME THINNER,
FLATTER, AND LARGER.

THESE CASTINGS GO THROUGH
A HEATING AND ROLLING CYCLE

UP TO 12 TIMES DEPENDING ON
THE TYPE OF CYMBAL BEING MADE.

THE REPEATED HEATING
AND CROSS-ROLLING

CREATES A DENSE,
INTERLOCKING WEAVE

IN THE GRANULAR STRUCTURE
OF THE ALLOY.

IT WILL MAKE THE CYMBALS STRONG
ENOUGH TO TAKE A REAL BEATING.

THE INTERLOCKING WEAVE WILL ALSO
HELP TRANSMIT SOUND WAVES

MORE RAPIDLY ACROSS THE CYMBAL.

AFTER THE CYMBAL
HAS BEEN TEMPERED

AND PRESSED
INTO ITS FINAL SHAPE,

THEY PLACE IT ON A SPINDLE.

WHILE IT SPINS,
CIRCULAR CUTTERS SHEAR THE EDGES

TO A SET DIAMETER.

NEXT, THE CYMBAL IS POUNDED.

A HYDRAULIC ENGINE
POWERS THIS HAMMERING CYLINDER,

AND A COMPUTER PROGRAM
DIRECTS THE FORCE.

THESE IMPRESSIONS WILL ENRICH
THE CYMBAL'S SOUND

BY CHANGING THE PATH
OF THE SOUND WAVES.

NEXT, THE APPLICATION
OF TONAL GROOVES.

THIS CRAFTSMAN PUTS THE CYMBAL
ON A LATHE, BOTTOM SIDE FORWARD.

THE CYMBAL SPINS ON AN AXLE

WHILE THE LATHING BLADE
CUTS INTO IT.

HE STARTS WITH
A HAND-HELD LATHING TOOL

AND THEN SWITCHES TO ONE
THAT'S MOUNTED ON THE MACHINE.

LATHING REMOVES THE CYMBAL'S
OUTER LAYER

AND CARVES THOSE IMPORTANT
TONAL GROOVES INTO IT.

THE DEPTH AND POSITION
WILL VARY

DEPENDING ON THE TYPE
OF CYMBAL BEING PRODUCED.

HE LATHES THE TOP OF THE CYMBAL
ENTIRELY BY HAND

SO HE CAN BETTER CONTROL
THE AMOUNT OF PRESSURE APPLIED.

WATCH THOSE FINGERS.

DON'T WORRY --
HE KNOWS WHAT HE'S DOING.

HE'S HONED HIS SKILLS OVER
FIVE YEARS OF APPRENTICESHIP,

AND NO AUTOMATIC MACHINE
CAN DUPLICATE THE FINE TOUCH

OF AN EXPERIENCED
CYMBAL CRAFTSMAN.

NOW HE REMOVES
THE NEWLY GROOVED CYMBAL

AND PUTS IT ON
AN EDGING MACHINE.

A BIG, ROUND METAL CLAMP
LOCKS THE CYMBAL IN PLACE.

IT SPINS WHILE A CUTTING TOOL
SMOOTHES OUT THE EDGE

OF THE CYMBAL.

HERE'S A BEFORE
AND AFTER SHOT --

THE RAGGED RIM IS BEFORE EDGING.

THE SMOOTHER ONE
AT THE BOTTOM IS AFTER.

THIS GUY HAS THE BEST JOB --

HE'S IN CHARGE
OF QUALITY ASSURANCE.

THAT MEANS HE TESTS EACH CYMBAL

BEFORE IT'S SENT OUT
INTO THE MARKETPLACE.

HE'S LISTENING
FOR A RANGE OF SOUNDS.

NOW A LASER ETCHES
THE TRADEMARK INTO THE CYMBAL.

IT ALSO ENGRAVES
A UNIQUE SERIAL NUMBER.

NEXT, A SILICON PAD SPONGES UP
INK FROM A PRINT PLATE

AND TRANSFERS IT TO THE CYMBAL.

NOW THAT THE COMPANY LOGO IS ON,

IT'S READY FOR SHIPPING
ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD.

BUT THIS ROUGH METAL CASTING
HAS ALREADY COME A LONG WAY.

IT'S BEEN TRANSFORMED
INTO A SMOOTH, SLEEK CYMBAL

OVER A TOTAL OF 21 DAYS.

CAPTIONS PAID FOR BY
DISCOVERY COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

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