How It's Made (2001–…): Season 6, Episode 11 - Individual Transporters/Cedar Canoes/Electric Guitars #1/Electric Guitars #2 - full transcript


CAPTIONS PAID FOR BY
DISCOVERY COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Narrator:
TODAY ON "HOW IT'S MADE"...

INDIVIDUAL TRANSPORTERS...

...CEDAR CANOES...

...AND ELECTRIC GUITARS.

IT'S THE WORLD'S
FIRST SELF-BALANCING,

ELECTRICALLY POWERED
PERSONAL TRANSPORTATION DEVICE.

BUILT-IN SENSORS
AND AN ONBOARD COMPUTER

KEEP THIS $6,000 VEHICLE UPRIGHT
AS IT ZOOMS AROUND,

UP TO THREE TIMES FASTER
THAN WALKING SPEED.

PERFECT FOR LARGE WAREHOUSES,
DELIVERY ROUTES,

OR ANYONE WHO JUST WANTS A LIFT.

TOUGH, LIGHTWEIGHT
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

ENABLE THE TRANSPORTER

TO SAFELY TAKE YOU
ALMOST ANYWHERE

YOU'D OTHERWISE WALK OR RUN.

THIS ALUMINUM CHASSIS WILL HOUSE
THE VEHICLE'S ELECTRONICS.

IT CAN WITHSTAND AN IMPACT FORCE

EQUIVALENT TO THE WEIGHT
OF THREE LARGE CARS.

USING A PRESS, A WORKER ATTACHES
COUPLINGS TO TWO MOTORS.

THESE COUPLINGS WILL CONNECT THE
MOTORS TO GEARBOXES LATER ON.

FOR SAFETY REASONS,

MANY OF THE TRANSPORTER'S
COMPONENTS ARE DOUBLED.

NORMALLY,
THEY'LL SHARE TASKS EQUALLY,

BUT ANY OF THE TWIN PARTS CAN DO
ALL THE WORK IF THE OTHER FAILS.

IT'S WHAT THE INDUSTRY CALLS
REDUNDANCY.

USING THREE SCREWS ON EACH SIDE,

SHE INSTALLS THE MOTORS
INTO THE CHASSIS.

THE WORKER THEN INSTALLS
TWO CONTROLLER BOARDS

IN THE TOP SIDE OF THE CHASSIS.

MICROPROCESSORS IN THESE BOARDS
CONTROL THE MOTORS.

THEN SHE ADDS WHAT'S CALLED
THE BALANCE-SENSOR ASSEMBLY.

THIS INCLUDES FIVE GYROSCOPES

AND TWO COMPONENTS
CALLED FLUID-TILT SENSORS.

THESE INSTRUMENTS
GAUGE THE VEHICLE'S POSITION

RELATIVE TO THE GROUND.

THE CONTROLLER BOARDS
CHECK THESE INSTRUMENTS

100 TIMES PER SECOND

AND ADJUST THE VEHICLE

BY ROLLING THE WHEELS FORWARD
OR BACKWARD

WHEN THE RIDER LEANS EITHER WAY.

NEXT COME WIRE CLUSTERS
CALLED HARNESSES.

THEY CONNECT THE VEHICLE'S
BATTERIES TO THE CONTROL SHAFT.

THE CHASSIS COVER
DOUBLES AS A FLOOR PLATE

FOR THE RIDER TO STAND ON.

WHEN YOU STEP ON, YOUR WEIGHT
PUSHES FOUR RUBBER BUTTONS.

THESE DISRUPT AN OPTICAL BEAM
ON THE CONTROLLER BOARD,

TELLING THE TRANSPORTER
IT HAS A RIDER.

THE HARNESSES FIT THROUGH HOLES
IN THE COVER,

WHICH ATTACHES
WITH EIGHT SCREWS.

NEXT, SHE CONNECTS THE HARNESSES
TO A POWER CONVERTER

IN THE BASE
OF THE CONTROL SHAFT.

THE POWER CONVERTER
USES HOUSEHOLD ELECTRICITY

TO RECHARGE THE BATTERIES.

INSIDE THE GEARBOX,

FOUR GEARS TRANSFER POWER FROM
THE MOTOR AND TURN THE WHEELS.

THE GEARS' TEETH
ARE CUT ON AN ANGLE

SO THEY ENGAGE GRADUALLY
AND MORE SMOOTHLY.

THIS KEEPS THE VEHICLE'S NOISE
TO A RELATIVELY LOW HUM.

THE WORKER TIGHTLY SECURES
THE GEARBOXES

TO THE CHASSIS WITH A MALLET.

THEN SHE OPENS
A WATERPROOF RUBBER SEAL

AND PLUGS IN THE MACHINE'S
POWER CORD.

SHE TESTS THE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
TO ENSURE THAT IT'S GROUNDED

AND THAT THERE'S NO
SHORT CIRCUIT.

NEXT, SHE USES FIVE SCREWS

TO ATTACH
ONE OF TWO PLASTIC FENDERS.

A TAPERED METAL HUB CONNECTS
EACH WHEEL TO ITS GEARBOX.

THE WHEELS ARE ABOUT THE HEIGHT
OF A SMALL BICYCLE TIRE

BUT THREE TIMES WIDER.

A MOLDED RUBBER AND METAL MAT
COVERS THE FLOOR PLATE

AND SNAPS INTO PLACE
ON BOTH FENDERS.

AFTER FLIPPING THE CHASSIS,

A WORKER CONNECTS TWO BATTERIES
TO THE CONTROLLER BOARDS.

WHEN YOU PLUG THE BATTERIES
INTO A WALL SOCKET,

THEY RECHARGE
IN ABOUT EIGHT HOURS.

THE TRANSPORTER RUNS AS FAR AS
23 MILES ON A SINGLE CHARGE,

DEPENDING ON THE TERRAIN.

THIS MACHINE TESTS
THE RIDER-DETECT BUTTONS

BY APPLYING PRESSURE
IN A RANDOM PATTERN.

THE RIDER AND CARGO
MUST WEIGH AT LEAST 99 POUNDS

BUT NO MORE THAN 260 POUNDS.

THE MACHINE ALSO TESTS
THE WHEELS AND MOTORS.

NEXT, THE HANDLEBAR
ON THE CONTROL SHAFT.

TO STEER, YOU TURN THE HANDGRIP
LEFT OR RIGHT.

THE MOTOR RESPONDS BY SPINNING
ONE WHEEL FASTER THAN THE OTHER.

YOU COULD ALSO SPIN THE WHEELS
ON OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS

TO MAKE THE VEHICLE PIVOT.

IGNITION KEYS
WITH COMPUTER CHIPS IN THEM

RESTRICT TRAVELING SPEEDS

TO EITHER 5 1/2, 10,
OR 12 1/2 MILES PER HOUR.

THE KEYS ALSO INSTRUCT
THE VEHICLE TO MAKE SLOW,

MEDIUM, OR SHARP TURNS.

NOW THE FUN PART -- TAKING EACH
TRANSPORTER FOR A TEST-DRIVE.

THE TESTER LISTENS
FOR UNUSUAL SOUNDS

AND CHECKS FOR VIBRATIONS
COMING FROM THE GEARBOXES.

HE FEELS HOW QUICKLY AND
RELIABLY THE CONTROLS RESPOND.

HE RUNS THE TRANSPORTER
UP SMALL INCLINES.

IT'S DESIGNED TO CONQUER SLOPES
OF UP TO 20 DEGREES,

DEPENDING ON TRACTION WITH THE
GROUND AND THE WEIGHT ON BOARD.

IT GOES DOWN OVER A SIDEWALK
CURB JUST AS EASILY.

ONLY AFTER THIS
THOROUGH TEST-DRIVE

IS THE TRANSPORTER READY
FOR ITS FIRST REAL TRIP.

Narrator: CANOES ARE TRULY
VESSELS OF HISTORY,

DATING BACK
AS FAR AS 10,000 YEARS.

NATIVE NORTH AMERICANS MADE THEM
WITH FRAMES OF WOODEN RIBS

COVERED WITH BARK.

THEY USED THESE BOATS TO FISH,
TRAVEL, AND TRADE.

TODAY'S CANOES
BLEND TRADITIONAL CONSTRUCTION

WITH SOME HIGH-TECH MATERIALS

FOR EVEN GREATER DURABILITY.

MOST OF THIS BOAT'S
MADE OF WHITE CEDAR,

WHICH IS LIGHTWEIGHT
AND WEATHERPROOF.

BUT FOR REINFORCEMENT,

THE RIM AND LEADING EDGES
ARE MADE OF ASH, A HEAVIER WOOD.

CONSTRUCTION STARTS

WITH AN UPSIDE-DOWN TEMPLATE
OF THE CANOE

THAT'S 15 1/2 FEET LONG.

A WORKER CLAMPS TWO LONG STRIPS
OF ASH, CALLED GUNWALES,

TO CREATE THE CANOE'S INNER RIM,

THEN ADDS SIMILAR STRIPS CURBING
ALONG THE TWO EXTREMITIES.

HE'LL ATTACH THE REST
OF THE SKELETON TO THIS RIM.

WORKERS SOFTEN WHAT WILL BE
THE BOAT'S CEDAR RIBS

IN NEARLY BOILING WATER
FOR 45 MINUTES.

THE RIBS ARE 2 INCHES WIDE
AND ALMOST A HALF-INCH THICK.

THE HOT WATER MAKES THEM
RELATIVELY PLIABLE.

USING A HAMMER FOR LEVERAGE,

THEY SIMPLY BEND THE RIBS
OVER THE TEMPLATE.

STEEL GUIDING STRIPS ENSURE THE
RIBS ARE 1 3/4 OF AN INCH APART.

WITH A PNEUMATIC STAPLE GUN,

WORKERS FIRE
TWO STAINLESS-STEEL STAPLES

THROUGH EACH END OF THE RIBS
AND INTO THE GUNWALES.

CEMENT BLOCKS WEIGH DOWN
SOME OF THE 43 RIBS

THAT WORKERS SECURE
OVER THE ENTIRE CANOE.

AT THIS POINT, THE RIBS MEASURE
BETWEEN 3 AND 5 FEET LONG,

DEPENDING ON THE AREA
THEY'RE COVERING.

THE WORKERS WILL LATER TRIM
THE ENDS TO ALIGN THEM.

NEXT, WORKERS MARK
THE CENTER LINE

ALONG THE BOTTOM OF THE BOAT
WITH A CHALK LINE.

THIS IS WHERE THEY'LL PUT
THE FIRST CEDAR PLANK

TO CREATE THE SKIN OF THE BOAT.

THEY LAY 18 ROWS OF PLANKS
ON THE BOAT

AND USE A BOX CUTTER
TO SHAPE THE ENDS INTO A CURVE.

THEY SECURE THE PLANKS
WITH BRASS TACKS.

BRASS BECAUSE
IT'S RUST-RESISTANT

AND ITS COLOR BLENDS WELL
WITH THE BLOND WOOD.

SINCE THE PLANKS
ARE STRAIGHT-ANGLED,

THIS PROCESS LEAVES
SOME WEDGE-LIKE SPACES

THEY'LL COVER SEPARATELY.

THEY CUT THIN WEDGES OF WOOD
TO COVER THE REMAINING SPACES.

IT TAKES 8 HOURS AND 2,500 TACKS

TO FIT ALL THE PLANKS
ON THE BOAT.

IN TOTAL, IT TAKES ONE PERSON
30 HOURS TO MAKE ONE CANOE.

USING A CIRCULAR SAW,

A WORKER TRIMS THE EXCESS
FROM THE ENDS OF THE RIBS.

THEN TWO WORKERS LIFT THE BOAT
OFF THE TEMPLATE,

FLIP IT RIGHT-SIDE UP,

AND SET IT DOWN TO REST
ON TWO SAWHORSES.

HERE, A WORKER FEELS
INSIDE THE BOAT

FOR ANY PROTRUDING TACKS.

HE USES A HAMMER AND METAL BLOCK
TO FLATTEN THEM.

MOST WERE DEFLECTED EARLIER

WHEN THEY HIT THE METAL
GUIDE STRIPS ON THE TEMPLATE.

A WORKER TIGHTENS A NYLON STRING
BETWEEN THE GUNWALES,

BRINGING THE BOATS EXTREMITIES
TOGETHER IN POINTS.

HE JOINS THE TIPS OF
THE GUNWALES WITH A SCREW

AT BOTH ENDS OF THE BOAT.

THEN HE INSTALLS TRIANGULAR
PIECES OF MAHOGANY.

THIS HARDWOOD STANDS OUT
VISUALLY WHEN STAINED

AND ALSO REINFORCES
THE ENDS OF THE BOAT.

WORKERS THEN TRIM
AND CLOSE OFF THE ENDS.

NEXT, THEY ATTACH TWO MORE
GUNWALES WITH 44 SCREWS

TO CREATE THE OUTER RIM
OF THE BOAT.

TO PROTECT THE WOOD
AND MAKE ITS SURFACE WATERTIGHT,

WORKERS COVER THE BOTTOM OF
THE CANOE WITH FIBERGLASS CLOTH.

THEN THEY SEAL IT WITH THREE
COATS OF CLEAR EPOXY RESIN,

WHICH WILL NEED UP TO TWO HOURS
OF DRYING TIME BETWEEN COATS.

WORKERS REINFORCE
THE FRONT AND BACK OF THE BOAT

WITH MORE FIBERGLASS
AND MORE RESIN.

THEY DO THIS BECAUSE THESE AREAS
WILL HIT ROCKS IN THE SHORE

MORE OFTEN THAN OTHER PARTS.

A WORKER FILLS HOLES HE DRILLED
THROUGH THE BOTTOM OF THE BOAT

WITH SILICONE.

THIS HELPS ATTACH THE KEEL,
THE SPINE OF THE BOAT,

AS WELL AS TWO LONG BRASS
COMPONENTS ON TOP OF THE KEEL.

WORKERS COMPLETE THIS STEP
BY FLIPPING THE CANOE

AND ATTACHING 37 SCREWS
THROUGH THE SILICONE

AND INTO THE KEEL.

AFTER THAWING FROZEN STRIPS
OF RAWHIDE LEATHER IN WATER,

A WORKER CUTS HOLES IN THEM.

THESE HOLES ENABLE HER
TO WEAVE THE STRIPS TOGETHER

TO COVER THE CANOE'S
TWO ASH-WOOD SEATS.

IT TAKES HER ABOUT AN HOUR

TO WEAVE THE REQUIRED 65 FEET
OF RAWHIDE.

THE PATTERN IS SIMILAR
TO WHAT YOU SEE

ON TRADITIONAL SNOWSHOES.

IT TAKES TWO DAYS

FOR THE LEATHER STRIPS
TO DRY OUT AND TIGHTEN.

WORKERS THEN PROTECT
AND STRENGTHEN THEM

WITH MARINE VARNISH.

THEN THEY INSTALL THE SEATS
INSIDE THE BOAT

WITH FOUR BRASS BOLTS.

NEXT COMES THE YOKE,

A BAR RUNNING ACROSS
THE WIDTH OF THE BOAT.

IT'S DESIGNED TO FIT
ON YOUR SHOULDERS

WHEN YOU CARRY THE BOAT
UPSIDE DOWN.

THE OTHER BAR
IS FOR SECURING GEAR SAFELY

WHILE YOU'RE OUT PADDLING
ON THE WATER.

BON VOYAGE.

Narrator: THE ELECTRIC GUITAR
DATES BACK TO THE 1920s.

THE ORIGINAL IDEA WAS TO AMPLIFY

THE SOUND
OF THE ACOUSTIC GUITAR.

THE FIRST COMMERCIALLY
SUCCESSFUL MODEL

CAME OUT IN 1932.

BY THE 1950s, THOUGH,

THE INSTRUMENT UNDERWENT
A RADICAL CHANGE,

ITS BODY EVOLVING FROM
THE TRADITIONAL HOLLOW SHAPE

TO A THIN, SOLID BLOCK OF WOOD.

GUITAR BODIES ARE USUALLY
MADE OF MAHOGANY, POPLAR,

OR CERTAIN MAPLE SPECIES --

LIGHTWEIGHT WOODS
THAT ARE FLEXIBLE ENOUGH

TO PRODUCE THE RIGHT BALANCE
OF TREBLE, MIDRANGE,

AND BASS VIBRATIONS.

WORKERS FIRST SAW A PLANK
OF WOOD INTO SPECIFIC WIDTHS.

THEY PLANE THE PIECES
TO A SPECIFIC THICKNESS,

USUALLY IN THE RANGE
OF 2 TO 4 INCHES.

THEN THEY MARK THEM
WITH THE SAME NUMBER

SO THEY'LL END UP
IN THE SAME GUITAR.

MIXING PIECES
FROM DIFFERENT PLANKS

WOULD COMBINE
DIFFERENT WOOD DENSITIES

AND MAKE THE BODY
VIBRATE UNEVENLY.

DAMP WOOD TENDS TO WARP,

SO THE PIECES HAVE TO GO
INTO A HEATED ROOM

UNTIL THEIR MOISTURE CONTENT
DROPS TO LESS THAN 6%.

THIS TAKES ABOUT TWO MONTHS.

ONCE THE WOOD DRIES OUT,

WORKERS GLUE AND CLAMP
THE PIECES TOGETHER,

SETTING THEM IN A VISE FOR THREE
HOURS UNTIL THE GLUE DRIES.

THE WATER-BASED GLUE
RE-WETS PART OF THE WOOD,

SO THE BLOCK HAS TO GO BACK
INTO THE DRYING ROOM

FOR ANOTHER TWO MONTHS.

WHEN IT COMES OUT,
IT GOES ONTO A HOLDING DEVICE.

THEN A COMPUTER-GUIDED
CUTTING MACHINE

USES EIGHT DIFFERENT HEADS,
ONE AFTER ANOTHER,

TO GRADUALLY CARVE
THE BODY SHAPE.

THIS IS A SEMI-ACOUSTIC MODEL,

SO THE BODY HAS
SOME HOLLOWED-OUT AREAS.

AFTER A FINE SANDING
TO SMOOTH THE SURFACE,

THEY TRIM THE CONTOUR
AT A 45-DEGREE ANGLE

USING A SMALL
STAINLESS-STEEL BLADE.

THEN THEY SAND AGAIN.

BY THIS POINT, THEY'VE ALSO
INSERTED ROUND METAL FIXTURES

TO HOLD THE BOLTS THAT WILL
ATTACH THE BODY AND NECK.

TO CONSTRUCT THE NECK,

THEY SLICE A PIECE OF MAHOGANY
OR HARD-ROCK MAPLE IN TWO

USING A DIAMOND-EDGED SAW
FOR A PERFECT CUT.

THEN THEY GLUE A .05-INCH-THICK
SHEET OF MAPLE VENEER

ONTO ONE PIECE.

THIS WILL BE THE FRONT SURFACE
OF THE NECK.

NOW THEY FLIP THE PIECE OVER
AND GLUE IT TO THE OTHER ONE.

FLIPPING INVERTS THE WOOD GRAIN.

THIS STRENGTHENS THE NECK,

ENABLING IT TO WITHSTAND THE
TENSION OF THE GUITAR STRINGS.

THE MAPLE VENEER HIDES
AND REINFORCES THE JOINT.

THEY CLAMP THE COMPONENTS
IN A VISE FOR THREE HOURS

UNTIL THE GLUE SETS.

A COMPUTER-GUIDED CUTTING
MACHINE CONTOURS THE NECK SHAPE

AND CUTS A GROOVE
DOWN THE MIDDLE

FOR A STEEL BAR
CALLED THE TRUSS ROD.

WHEN THE NECK BOWS FROM TENSION
CREATED BY HEAVY-GAUGE STRINGS,

YOU STRAIGHTEN IT

BY ADJUSTING THE PROTRUDING END
OF THE TRUSS ROD.

NEXT, THE FINGERBOARD --

THE SURFACE AGAINST WHICH
YOU PRESS THE STRINGS

TO PRODUCE DIFFERENT NOTES
AND CHORDS.

IT'S MADE OF MAPLE, EBONY,
OR ROSEWOOD.

AFTER GLUING THE FINGERBOARD
OVER THE TRUSS ROD,

THEY PLACE THE NECK
INTO A VACUUM PRESS.

THE PRESS SUCKS OUT ALL THE AIR,

COMPRESSING THE COMPONENTS
INTO ONE SOLID UNIT.

ONCE THE GLUE DRIES,

THE NECK GOES ONTO A
COMPUTER-GUIDED CARVING MACHINE.

ITS 12 DIFFERENT CUTTING HEADS
FINALIZE THE SHAPE.

NEXT, A 22-BLADE SAW

SIMULTANEOUSLY CUTS VERY PRECISE
SLOTS FOR 22 FRET WIRES,

THE METAL LINES
ON THE FINGERBOARD.

A WORKER ROUNDS OFF AND SMOOTHES
THE BACK OF THE NECK

AGAINST A BELT SANDER...

...THEN INSTALLS THE FRET WIRES.

THE WIRES
ARE MADE OF NICKEL AND LEAD.

THEY HAVE TEETH ON THE BOTTOM
THAT GRAB THE WOOD.

THAT'S WHY IT'S ESSENTIAL

THAT THE SLOTS BE A VERY PRECISE
WIDTH AND DEPTH.

FINALLY, THEY RUN
THE SIDES OF THE NECK

AGAINST THE SANDING BELT.

THIS TRIMS OFF
THE EXCESS FRET WIRE

AND ROUNDS OFF THE EDGES
OF THE FINGERBOARD.

BACK TO THE BODY NOW.

A WORKER PUTS IT
IN A SILK-SCREEN PRINTER

TO APPLY THE COMPANY NAME.

THE INK DRIES IN JUST SECONDS
UNDER ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT.

AFTER APPLYING A SEALANT
TO BLOCK THE WOOD'S PORES,

THEY SPRAY ON UP TO 22 COATS
OF WOOD STAIN AND LACQUER.

THIS PROTECTS THE WOOD

AND GIVES IT
A SEMI- OR HIGH-GLOSS FINISH.

Narrator:
NOW ONTO THE MECHANICS.

AN ELECTRIC GUITAR WORKS
LIKE THIS.

A MAGNET-AND-COIL ASSEMBLY
CALLED A PICKUP

WORKS LIKE A MINI-MICROPHONE.

IT PICKS UP THE SOUND VIBRATIONS
OF THE STRINGS

AND SENDS THEM TO AN AMPLIFIER

WHICH SENDS THEM TO A SPEAKER

WHICH EMITS THAT TRADEMARK
ELECTRIC-GUITAR SOUND.

BEFORE INSTALLING THE ELECTRONIC
COMPONENTS, THOUGH,

A FEW FINAL STEPS.

AFTER A 6-WEEK CURING PERIOD,

THEY WET-SAND THE PAINTED
AND LACQUERED WOOD,

THEN BUFF UNTIL THE SURFACE
IS SO GLOSSY

IT PRODUCES A MIRROR FINISH.

THEN THEY POLISH IT WITH WAX.

IF THE FRETS AREN'T LEVEL,
THE GUITAR WILL BUZZ,

SO WORKERS COLOR THE TOP
OF EACH FRET WITH A MARKER,

THEN RUN A SHEET
OF FINE SANDPAPER

DOWN THE FINGERBOARD.

THE INK RUBS OFF ON ANY FRETS
THAT ARE HIGHER THAN THE REST

AND HAVE TO BE FILED DOWN.

THE FILINGS FLATTEN
THE FRET'S EDGES,

SO WORKERS ROUND THEM OFF
USING A SPECIAL CURVED FILE.

THEN, WITH VERY FINE SANDPAPER,

THEY BUFF AWAY THE FILING MARKS.

THEY CLEAN THE FINGERBOARD
WITH MINERAL OIL.

THIS ALSO NOURISHES THE ROSEWOOD
SO IT WON'T DRY OUT AND CRACK.

NOW THEY TURN AN ALLEN KEY
IN THE TRUSS ROD

TO STRAIGHTEN OUT THE NECK.

THIS GAUGE MEASURES THE CURVE.

WHEN THE NEEDLE HITS ZERO,

THE NECK IS PERFECTLY STRAIGHT.

NOW THE SIX TUNING KEYS --

ONE FOR EACH STRING.

DEPENDING ON THE MODEL,

THESE STEEL KEYS ARE PLATED
WITH EITHER GOLD OR NICKEL

OR PAINTED BLACK.

YOU TURN THE BLACK ACRYLIC PEG

TO TIGHTEN OR LOOSEN THE STRING
FOR TUNING.

WORKERS USE A DIGITAL GAUGE

TO MEASURE THE HEIGHT
OF THE NUT --

A THIN PIECE OF EITHER BONE
OR VERY HARD PLASTIC

WITH SIX SLOTS
TO SPACE THE STRINGS.

IF IT ISN'T IN PRECISELY
THE RIGHT POSITION,

TUNING WILL BE OFF
AND THE STRINGS WILL BUZZ.

NOW THE NECK IS READY
TO JOIN THE BODY,

COURTESY OF FOUR BOLTS DRIVEN
FROM THE BACK OF THE INSTRUMENT.

THEY FIT INTO
THOSE ROUND METAL FIXTURES

WE SAW IN THE PREVIOUS SEGMENT.

AND NOW
THE ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS.

WORKERS BEGIN
BY SOLDERING CONTROL KNOBS

FOR THE VOLUME AND TONE

TO THE PICKUP SELECTOR SWITCH --

THE SWITCH THAT ACTIVATES
ANY OF THE PICKUPS --

SETS OF MAGNETS WITH WIRE
COILED AROUND THEM.

LIKE MINIATURE MICROPHONES,

THEY PICK UP
THE SOUND VIBRATIONS

ENTERING THEIR MAGNETIC FIELD,

TRANSFORM THEM
INTO ELECTRONIC SIGNALS,

WHICH THEN GO OUT
TO THE AMPLIFIER AND SPEAKER.

ONE PICKUP WILL BE
JUST ABOVE THE BRIDGE --

A BRASS PIECE THAT ANCHORS
THE OTHER END OF THE STRINGS.

THE PICKUP HAS ONE MAGNET
AND WIRE COIL FOR EACH STRING.

STANDARD ELECTRIC GUITARS DON'T
HAVE A PICKUP AT THE BRIDGE,

BUT THIS MODEL HAS ONE

TO ENABLE THE INSTRUMENT TO ALSO
SOUND LIKE AN ACOUSTIC GUITAR.

YOU CAN EVEN USE THE ELECTRIC
AND ACOUSTIC SOUNDS TOGETHER.

WORKERS DRILL HOLES IN THE BODY
FOR INSTALLING THE BRIDGE,

USING A TEMPLATE AS A GUIDE.

THEY ATTACH THE BRIDGE
WITH SCREWS...

...THEN INSTALL THE BRIDGE
PICKUP JUST ABOVE IT

AND THE BODY AND NECK PICKUPS
ABOVE THAT.

THEN THEY FLIP IT OVER

AND HOOK UP WHAT'S CALLED
THE TREMOLO,

A LEVER-ACTIVATED SET
OF STEEL SPRINGS

THAT TEMPORARILY LOOSEN
THE GUITAR STRINGS.

THE MUSICIAN USES THE TREMOLO
ON SELECT NOTES AND CHORDS

TO CREATE A QUIVERING EFFECT --

THAT DISTINCTIVE
ELECTRIC-GUITAR SOUND.

THE VOLUME AND TONE KNOBS
COME NEXT,

TUCKED INTO A CAVITY
IN THE BACK,

THEN SECURED TO THE FRONT
WITH A NUT.

NOW THE PICKUP SELECTOR SWITCH.

IT ALSO COMES THROUGH THE BACK
TO THE FRONT OF THE INSTRUMENT.

THEN THEY ADD THE LAST
ELECTRONIC COMPONENT --

A JACK FOR THE CABLE
GOING TO THE AMPLIFIER.

THEY PLUG IN THE CABLE,

AND FLICKING
THE SELECTOR SWITCH,

DO A TAP TEST ON EACH PICK UP.

NOW IT'S TIME
TO STRING THE GUITAR.

THEY PULL THE STEEL STRINGS
FROM THE BACK

THROUGH THE BRIDGE IN THE FRONT,

THEN WIND THEM
ONTO THE TUNING KEYS

USING A DRILL
WITH A SPECIAL ADAPTOR.

THEN IT'S INTO
A SOUNDPROOF BOOTH

TO TUNE THE GUITAR WITH THE HELP
OF A DIGITAL TUNER.

AND THEN IT'S PLAYED
FOR THE FIRST TIME.

[ PLAYING SCALES ]

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