How It's Made (2001–…): Season 5, Episode 9 - Sulkies/Bagpipes/Yule Logs/Fishing Lures - full transcript

Discover the fascinating process of making everyday items such as sulkies, bagpipes, Yule logs and fishing lures.


Narrator: TODAY
ON "HOW IT'S MADE"...

SULKIES...

BAGPIPES...

YULE LOGS...

AND FISHING LURES.

IN THE SPORT OF HARNESS RACING,

THE HORSE,
KNOWN AS A STANDARDBRED,

PULLS ITS DRIVER IN A SULKY.

A SULKY IS A CART ON TWO WHEELS

THAT ATTACHES TO EACH SIDE
OF THE HORSE'S HARNESS.

IT HAS TO BE STURDY ENOUGH
TO WITHSTAND THE ROUGH RIDE,

BUT IT ALSO
HAS TO BE LIGHTWEIGHT

SO THAT IT WON'T SLOW
THE HORSE DOWN.

STEP ONE IN SULKY PRODUCTION

IS TO CUT AN ALUMINUM TUBE
1 1/2 INCHES IN DIAMETER

FOR THE FRAME.

MOST OF THE PARTS ARE ALUMINUM

BECAUSE IT'S
A LIGHTWEIGHT METAL.

USING A MANUALLY OPERATED
TUBE BENDER,

WORKERS SHAPE THE ANGLES
OF THE SULKY'S SHAFT,

THE PIECE THAT ATTACHES
TO THE HARNESS.

NOW THEY WELD TOGETHER
THE EIGHT ALUMINUM PARTS

THAT MAKE UP THE SULKY'S FRAME.

ALL THIS WELDING TAKES
APPROXIMATELY 2 1/2 HOURS.

ONCE THAT'S DONE,

THEY INSERT THE SHAFT
INTO THE BRIDGE

ON WHICH THE DRIVER SITS,

MAKING SURE THEY ALIGN
WITH EACH OTHER.

NEXT COME THE CLAMPS --

3-INCH-LONG STEEL PIECES
WITH A HOLE ON EACH END.

THEY FASTEN CERTAIN NON-WELDED
PARTS OF THE SULKY TOGETHER.

EACH CLAMP STARTS OFF STRAIGHT.

A WORKER MOUNTS IT ON A MACHINE
CALLED THE BENDER,

THEN PULLS THE LEVER ALMOST
360 DEGREES TO CURVE IT.

NEXT A TOOL CALLED
A MULTIPRESS DRILL

FASHIONS THE ALUMINUM FLANGE --

THE PART OF THE WHEEL HUB
TO WHICH THE SPOKES ATTACH.

THE MULTIPRESS HAS SIX BITS.

IT ROTATES THREE TIMES TO DRILL
A TOTAL OF 18 HOLES.

THE FLANGE HAS ANOTHER
NINE HOLES TO REMOVE WEIGHT

AND SIX SMALLER HOLES TO WHICH
A PLASTIC WHEEL PROTECTOR

WILL LATER ATTACH.

NOW THEY POSITION THE FLANGE
ON THE ALUMINUM HUB

AND HAMMER IT ON SNUGLY.

THEY DO THIS USING A TOOL
CALLED A PUNCH

TO AVOID LEAVING IMPACT MARKS.

NEXT, A SLEEVE
GOES INSIDE THE HUB,

AND THE BEARING
GOES IN BETWEEN THE TWO.

AGAIN, WITH THE HELP OF A PUNCH,

THEY KNOCK
ON THE BEARING SNUGLY.

FINALLY, THEY INSTALL A CAP

TO PREVENT DUST FROM GETTING IN
AND CAUSING DAMAGE.

THE HUB IS NOW COMPLETE,

AND IT TOOK ONLY ABOUT
FIVE MINUTES TO ASSEMBLE.

NOW THEY ATTACH ALUMINUM SPOKES,

18 OF THEM
ON EACH SIDE OF THE WHEEL.

EVERY SPOKE ATTACHES
TO THE FLANGE ON ONE END

AND TO AN ALUMINUM RIM
ON THE OTHER.

WORKERS HAND-TIGHTEN A NIPPLE
ON THE RIM END OF EACH SPOKE.

THE NIPPLES ARE MADE OF BRASS

BECAUSE IT RESISTS
RUST QUITE WELL.

IT'S ESSENTIAL TO TIGHTEN
ALL THE NIPPLES EQUALLY

TO ENSURE THE WHEEL
WILL BE PROPERLY ALIGNED.

AFTER TIGHTENING THEM FURTHER
WITH THE SCREWDRIVER,

ON GOES SOME RIM TAPE,
THEN THE TUBE AND TIRE.

THEY PUMP UP THE TUBE
WITH UP TO 78 POUNDS OF AIR.

THEN THEY INSTALL
A PLASTIC PROTECTOR DISC.

THIS PREVENTS COMPETING HORSES

FROM PUTTING THEIR HOOVES
THROUGH THE SPOKES.

MEANWHILE, THE SULKY
HAS BEEN SANDBLASTED,

PAINTED, AND DECORATED.

NOW IT'S TIME TO PUT STIRRUPS
ON THE SHAFTS.

THESE ALUMINUM
AND STAINLESS-STEEL FITTINGS

ON THE END OF THE SHAFTS

ARE WHAT ATTACH THE SULKY
TO THE HORSE'S HARNESS.

SHOULD THE HARNESS BREAK,

A BACKUP SAFETY STRAP
ON EACH SHAFT

KEEPS THE SULKY
ATTACHED TO THE HORSE.

NOW THEY FASTEN
A PADDED LEATHER SEAT

TO AN ALUMINUM PLATE
MOUNTED ON THE BRIDGE.

ON EACH SIDE, THEY ATTACH
THE WHEEL TO THE BRIDGE

WITH A SIMPLE AXLE.

EVEN THOUGH THESE LOOK LIKE
BICYCLE WHEELS,

THEY'RE STRONGER
AND FAR MORE DURABLE.

NEXT, THEY ASSEMBLE
WHAT'S CALLED THE TREE --

THE RIGID
STAINLESS-STEEL STRUCTURE

THAT GOES ON THE HORSE'S BACK.

THE OUTER PART
IS MADE OF PLASTIC.

THEY STITCH VELCRO
TO THE UNDERSIDE.

TO THAT, THEY ATTACH
A NYLON-COVERED FOAM PADDING

THAT PROTECTS THE HORSE'S BACK
FROM IRRITATION.

THE FINISHED HARNESS
WITH ALL ITS HOOKS AND TURRETS

WEIGHS 10 POUNDS.

IT'S TAKEN 20 HOURS TO MAKE.

THIS IS WHAT'S CALLED
A QUICK-HITCH FITTING.

IT HOOKS ON TO THE FITTING
ON THE END OF EACH SHAFT,

TYING THE SULKY
TO THE HORSE'S HARNESS.

A SULKY TAKES 40 HOURS
TO ASSEMBLE.

IT WEIGHS BETWEEN
JUST 50 AND 60 POUNDS.

HARNESS RACING IS ONE
OF THE FEW SPORTS

WHERE BEING A LIGHTWEIGHT IS KEY
TO A GOOD TRACK RECORD.

Narrator: THE BAGPIPE IS ONE
OF THE OLDEST INSTRUMENTS.

TO PLAY IT, YOU BLOW INTO A PIPE

ATTACHED TO A LEATHER
OR SYNTHETIC BAG,

THEN PRESS ON THE BAG
TO FORCE THE AIR OUT

THROUGH OTHER PIPES
TO CREATE SOUND.

YOU TRANSFORM THIS SOUND
INTO A MELODY

USING FINGER HOLES ON A REEDED
PIPE CALLED A CHANTER.

[ BAGPIPE MUSIC PLAYS ]

THEY START BY CARVING
AN 8-INCH-LONG BLOCK OF WOOD,

ROUNDING IT TO A DIAMETER

OF A LITTLE MORE
THAN 1 1/2 INCHES.

IT'S PART OF A DRONE --

ONE OF THREE ON THE BAGPIPE THAT
CREATE BASS AND TENOR HARMONIES.

THEY DRILL A HOLE THAT WILL
LATER BECOME AN AIR CHANNEL.

USING A LATHE AND A PLASTIC
TEMPLATE AS A GUIDE,

A CRAFTSMAN SPINS THE WOOD
TO CARVE IT,

A PROCESS CALLED TURNING.

THE LATHE HAS A STATIONARY
CARBIDE-TIP CUTTER

STRONG AND PRECISE ENOUGH TO CUT
THIS HARD AFRICAN BLACKWOOD.

IT'S A VERY HEAVY AND DRY WOOD,
PERFECT FOR TURNING.

FOR MORE INTRICATE,
DECORATIVE CUTS,

HE USES A HANDHELD DEVICE
CALLED A COMBING TOOL.

NEXT, HE USES WHAT'S CALLED
A PARTING-OFF TOOL

TO MAKE ADDITIONAL
DECORATIVE GROOVES.

HE MEASURES THESE GROOVES
USING A CALIPER

TO ENSURE THEY MEET THE
SPECIFICATIONS OF THE DESIGN.

THE CRAFTSMAN DRILLS A HOLE

TO CREATE WHAT'S CALLED
A PROJECTING MOUNT.

IT'S MADE OF IMITATION IVORY,
AND AT 2 INCHES IN DIAMETER,

IT FITS ON THE DRONE
LIKE A WASHER.

BUT IT'S JUST FOR DECORATION --
ONE OF SEVEN ON THE BAGPIPE.

HE ADDS A METAL COMPONENT CALLED
A SLIDE, ALSO FOR DECORATION.

NEXT, HE TURNS WHAT'S CALLED
A BLOWPIPE.

THIS ONE'S MADE OF PLASTIC TO
WITHSTAND MOISTURE FROM SALIVA.

TRADITIONALISTS PREFER BLOWPIPES
MADE OF WOOD.

HE ADDS A MOUTHPIECE.

IT RETRACTS BY ALMOST
EIGHT INCHES,

DEPENDING ON
THE PLAYER'S HEIGHT.

THE PLAYER BLOWS
INTO THE MOUTHPIECE

TO INFLATE THE BAG.

A SMALL METAL TUBE
BETWEEN TWO PLASTIC BLADES

FORMS THE CHANTER REED.

WHEN AIR STRIKES IT,

THE REED VIBRATES
INSIDE THE CHANTER --

A PIPE AT THE BOTTOM
OF THE INSTRUMENT

THAT HAS EIGHT FINGER HOLES
FOR NOTES

AND TWO FOR PITCH ADJUSTMENT.

TO SECURE IT,

THE CRAFTSMAN WRAPS THE REED
WITH HEMP STRING

AND WINDS TEFLON TAPE
OVER THE STRING

FOR AN AIRTIGHT SEAL.

THEN A BRASS WIRE
CALLED A BRIDLE

TO CONTROL THE SHAPE
OF THE REED.

NARROWING THE OPENING PRODUCES
A HIGHER-PITCHED SOUND.

THE CRAFTSMAN TIES HEMP STRING
TO CREATE TRACTION

BETWEEN THE DRONE SEGMENTS,
HOLDING THEM TOGETHER.

HEMP STRING IS
ESPECIALLY DURABLE,

YET EASILY REPLACED IF DAMAGED.

HERE'S THE COMPLETED
TENOR DRONE.

NEXT, THE CRAFTSMAN INSERTS
WHAT'S CALLED A STOCK

THROUGH THE ZIPPERED OPENING
OF THE PIPE BAG.

THE PIPE BAG'S MADE OF A
SYNTHETIC, BREATHABLE MATERIAL.

THE FIVE STOCKS FIT THROUGH
A RUBBER COLLAR IN THE BAG,

ATTACHING TO THE THREE DRONES,
THE CHANTER, AND THE BLOWPIPE.

THE CRAFTSMAN INSERTS
THE CHANTER THROUGH A SLEEVE

IN THE BOTTOM OF THE PIPE BAG.

HE SECURES IT WITH STRING,
TIGHTENING IT AROUND THE BAG.

HE CLOSES THE ZIPPER TO FORM
AN AIRTIGHT SEAL.

NEXT, HE PLACES THE PIPE BAG

INTO A DECORATIVE
VELVETEEN BAG COVER.

HE INSERTS THE STOCKS
THROUGH HOLES

TRIMMED WITH WOOL
OR SILK FRINGE.

A RUBBER VALVE
PREVENTS THE PLAYER'S AIR

FROM COMING BACK UP
THROUGH THE BLOWPIPE,

CHANNELING IT THROUGH
THE CHANTER INSTEAD.

ANOTHER PART,
CALLED A DRONE REED,

ACTS LIKE A PLASTIC TONGUE.

IT VIBRATES OVER A LONG HOLE

TO CREATE THE BAGPIPE'S
HUMMING SOUND.

THE CRAFTSMAN INSERTS
THE DRONE REED INTO THE DRONE

AND THEN INTO ITS STOCK.

WOOL CORDS KEEP THE DRONES
IN PLACE WHILE THE PLAYER PLAYS.

FINALLY, THE CRAFTSMAN
FITS THE CHANTER REED

INTO THE CHANTER,
THEN SLIDES IT INTO ITS STOCK.

A BAGPIPER MUST HAVE
A STRONG SET OF LUNGS

BECAUSE SOME SONGS
CAN RUN FOR 20 MINUTES.

NOW THAT'S LONG-WINDED.

[ BAGPIPE MUSIC PLAYS ]

Narrator: A YULE LOG
IS A TRADITIONAL DESSERT

FOR REVEILLANT,

THE CHRISTMAS-EVE MEAL
THAT FOLLOWS MIDNIGHT MASS

IN FRANCE AND OTHER
FRENCH-SPEAKING COUNTRIES.

IT'S A ROLLED SPONGE CAKE
COVERED IN CHOCOLATE FROSTING

AND DECORATED TO LOOK LIKE
A TREE LOG.

IT'S SUPPOSED TO REPRESENT
A REAL YULE LOG,

THE BURNING OF WHICH WAS ONCE
A POPULAR CHRISTMAS RITUAL.

THIS COMPANY USES VANILLA
OR CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

INSTEAD OF FROSTING.

THE CAKE ITSELF
IS CHOCOLATE SPONGE CAKE.

WORKERS START BY MAKING
CHOCOLATE CAKE BATTER

IN A MACHINE CALLED A LIQUEFIER.

THEY ADD FLAVORING, EXACTLY WHAT
IS A TRADE SECRET,

AND LIQUID EGGS...

...BINDING AGENTS...

...BUTTER OIL...

...SUGAR...

...FLOUR...

...AND COCOA.

AFTER MIXING THE BATTER
FOR 20 MINUTES,

A MACHINE CALLED
THE CAKE DEPOSITOR

PUMPS IT INTO A 13-GALLON VAT.

THE CAKE DEPOSITOR DISTRIBUTES
THE BATTER EVENLY

THROUGH NOZZLES SPACED
3 1/2 INCHES APART.

THEN IT SPREADS THE BATTER
ONTO BROWN CRAFT PAPER

THAT'S A LITTLE MORE
THAN THREE FEET WIDE.

THE PAPER'S WAXED SO THE CAKE
WON'T STICK AFTER BAKING.

THE MACHINE FUNNELS THE BATTER
INTO AN EVEN LAYER

THAT'S 1/4 OF AN INCH THICK
AND 36 INCHES WIDE.

WORKERS MAKE BETWEEN 8,000
TO 10,000 YULE LOGS DAILY,

DEPENDING ON THE SIZE.

AFTER BAKING FOR SEVEN MINUTES
AT 500 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT,

A CONVEYOR MOVES THE CAKE OUT OF
THE OVEN AT SIX FEET PER MINUTE.

NEXT, A CIRCULAR SAW SEPARATES
THE CAKE RIGHT DOWN THE MIDDLE.

EVERY 17 SECONDS, ANOTHER BLADE,

APPROPRIATELY CALLED
A GUILLOTINE, DROPS DOWN,

SLICING THE CAKE
INTO SMALLER SEGMENTS.

A MACHINE POURS STRAWBERRY JAM
ONTO A THICK LAYER OF ICE CREAM.

THIS CREATES THREE LAYERS,

INCLUDING THE CAKE SLAB
UNDERNEATH.

THE FACTORY GOES THROUGH MORE
THAN 4,000 POUNDS OF JAM

AND 3,000 GALLONS OF ICE CREAM
PER 8-HOUR SHIFT.

A WORKER GENTLY SEPARATES
THE CAKE SLABS,

LEAVING ABOUT THREE INCHES
OF EXCESS ICE CREAM AND JAM,

WHICH IS THROWN AWAY.

SHE THEN SEPARATES THE CAKE
FROM THE CRAFT PAPER

BY FOLDING THE CAKE
ONTO ITSELF ONCE,

THEN ROLLING THE CAKE,
ICE CREAM,

AND JAM LAYERS TOGETHER.

WATCH CLOSELY AND YOU'LL SEE

THAT SHE DOESN'T TOUCH THE CAKE,
ONLY THE PAPER.

SHE WEARS RUBBER GLOVES
TO PREVENT HER HANDS

FROM STICKING TO THE PAPER.

THE WORKER ROLLS THE CAKE
INTO A MACHINE CALLED A SLICER.

IT CUTS THE CAKE INTO THREE
8-INCH-LONG SEGMENTS

CALLED LOGS.

THE SLICER DEPOSITS THE LOGS
INTO PLASTIC TRAYS.

ANOTHER MACHINE NOW DECORATES
WITH ICE CREAM.

IT COVERS THE SURFACE
AS WELL AS THE ENDS.

THE ICE CREAM DECORATIONS
ARE LACE AND FLORAL DESIGNS.

NOW FOR THE EMBELLISHMENTS.

WORKERS PLACE TWO CANDIED
MARASCHINO CHERRIES ON EACH LOG.

THEN A MACHINE DRIZZLES ON
BITS OF MAPLE SUGAR

AS ANOTHER WORKER CUTS
THE CONNECTING ICE CREAM,

SEPARATING THE LOGS.

THIS FACTORY USES
MAPLE SUGAR BITS

INSTEAD OF NUTS ON ITS LOGS
OUT OF CONCERN FOR ALLERGIES.

NEXT, A PLASTIC POINSETTIA
ON EACH LOG.

THEN, A PLASTIC
"JOYEUSES FêTES,"

WHICH IS FRENCH
FOR "HAPPY HOLIDAYS."

A CONVEYOR BELT MOVES THE LOGS

THROUGH A MACHINE
CALLED A CO2 TUNNEL.

INSIDE, SPRAYERS BLAST THE LOGS
WITH A MIST

THAT INSTANTLY FREEZES THEM.

THIS MIST IS CARBON DIOXIDE

REFRIGERATED TO
MINUS 185 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

FIVE MINUTES IN THE CO2 TUNNEL
SUPERFREEZES THE OUTER LAYER

SO WORKERS CAN HANDLE IT EASILY.

A WRAPPING MACHINE
COVERS THE LOGS

IN A CLEAR PLASTIC FILM.

THEN ANOTHER MACHINE
SIMULTANEOUSLY

CUTS AND HEAT-SEALS THE PLASTIC,
ENCLOSING THE LOGS IN BAGS.

FINALLY, A WORKER PACKS THE BAGS
INTO BOXES FOR SHIPPING.

THE FACTORY STORES THE BOXES
IN ITS WAREHOUSE FREEZERS

AT MINUS 95 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

THEN, AS CHRISTMAS APPROACHES,

THESE HOLIDAY DESSERTS
GO OUT TO THE STORES,

WHERE THEY SELL
FOR $5 TO $8 EACH.

Narrator: IF YOU TAKE
YOUR FISHING SERIOUSLY,

CHANCES ARE
YOU'RE HOOKED ON LURES.

IF WORM BAIT IS LIKE HAMBURGER,

THEN LURES
ARE LIKE FILET MIGNON.

THEY ATTRACT FISH BY EITHER
MIMICKING THE FOOD THEY LIKE --

IMPERSONATING A MINNOW,
FOR EXAMPLE --

OR BY REFLECTING LIGHT.

LURES COME IN
MANY SHAPES AND SIZES.

THEY CAN MEASURE
UP TO A FOOT LONG

AND WEIGH AS MUCH
AS 3/4 OF A POUND.

THEY'RE USUALLY MADE OF BRASS.

THIS MODEL IS FROM A BRASS SHEET

THAT'S LESS THAN 3/100
OF AN INCH THICK.

IT GOES INTO A PRESS THAT'S
OUTFITTED WITH A SERIES OF DIES

TO PROGRESSIVELY CUT
AND SHAPE THE LURES,

TURNING OUT 2,000 OF THEM
PER HOUR.

THIS LOOKS LIKE
ONE FAST OPERATION,

BUT IT'S REALLY
FOUR CONSECUTIVE STEPS.

THE FIRST DIE STAMPS THE COMPANY
NAME AND LURE MODEL NUMBER,

PUNCHES A SLOT DOWN THE MIDDLE,

AND PUNCTURES A HOLE
ON EACH END.

THE SECOND DIE
SCORES THE OUTLINE.

THE THIRD CUTS IT OUT.

THE FOURTH AND FINAL DIE FORMS
THE PIECE INTO A SPOON SHAPE,

WHICH IS WHY THIS TYPE OF LURE
IS CALLED A SPOON.

THIS SHAPE MAKES IT MOVE
IN THE WATER LIKE A SMALL FISH.

THAT BLUE OBJECT AT THE BOTTOM
RIGHT IS AN AIR JET.

IT BLOWS THE LURES COMING OFF
THE PRESS INTO A COLLECTION BIN.

LURES VARY IN SIZE,
SHAPE, AND TEXTURE,

AND PLATING THEM
IN DIFFERENT METALS

CREATES REFLECTIVE EFFECTS
IN THE WATER.

ALL THESE FACTORS
DETERMINE THE TYPE OF FISH

THE LURES ATTRACT.

THE METAL-PLATING PROCESS
IS CALLED ELECTROPLATING

BECAUSE ELECTRICITY IS THE KEY
TO IT ALL.

WORKERS WIRE UP THE LURES,

SUBMERGE THEM
IN AN ACID SOLUTION,

THEN RUN A NEGATIVE CURRENT
THROUGH THEM.

THEY RUN A POSITIVE CURRENT
TO THE PLATING METAL,

IN THIS CASE, COPPER NUGGETS.

THE ACID DISSOLVES THE COPPER
INTO PARTICLES

LACED WITH A POSITIVE CHARGE.

THIS DRAWS THEM TO
THE NEGATIVE-CHARGED LURES,

WHICH THEY COAT
IN AN EVEN LAYER OF COPPER.

AFTER A THOROUGH RINSE,

THE RACKS GO INTO THE NEXT TANK
FOR NICKEL-PLATING,

THEN ANOTHER RINSE
AND INTO ANOTHER TANK

FOR SILVER-PLATING --
THE FINAL FINISH.

SILVER-PLATING REQUIRES
UNDERCOATS OF COPPER AND NICKEL.

TO PREVENT THE SILVER
FROM TARNISHING,

WORKERS COAT THE LURES
IN CLEAR LACQUER,

USING THE SAME PLATING PROCESS.

LURES PLATED IN 24-KARAT GOLD
DON'T NEED LACQUERING

BECAUSE GOLD DOESN'T TARNISH.

NOW FOR THE COSMETICS.

ONE WAY TO DECORATE THE LURE IS
BY WHAT'S CALLED PAD PRINTING.

AN AUTOMATED MACHINE APPLIES INK
TO A METAL PLATE

WITH A DESIGN ETCHED INTO IT.

A SILICONE PAD STAMPS THE PLATE,
PICKING UP THE DESIGN,

THEN STAMPS THE LURE,
TRANSFERRING IT.

THIS IS A 2-COLOR DESIGN,
SO THERE ARE TWO PADS AT WORK.

IT'S QUICK-DRY INK,
SO THE COLORS DON'T SMUDGE.

ANOTHER WAY TO DECORATE LURES
IS TO APPLY DECALS.

THEY ADHERE WITH WATERPROOF GLUE

THAT'S SPECIALLY DESIGNED
FOR THE FISHING INDUSTRY.

AFTER DECORATING, WORKERS
ATTACH A 3-PRONGED HOOK --

A TREBLE HOOK --
TO A SPLIT RING.

THAT'S THE RING
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE LURE

TO WHICH THE FISHING LINE
AND THE HOOK WILL BE ATTACHED.

SOME MODELS
HAVE DECORATED HOOKS,

KNOWN AS DRESSED HOOKS.

THE IDEA IS TO ADD
A COLOR ACCENT

TO MAKE THE LURE LOOK MORE LIKE
THE FISHES' PREY.

TO DO THIS,

THEY FIRST WIND A NYLON THREAD
AROUND THE SHAFT OF THE HOOK,

THEN TRIM OFF THE LOOSE END.

NEXT, THEY LAY TOGETHER
TWO DIFFERENT-COLORED HACKLES.

HACKLES ARE THE FILAMENTS
OF A ROOSTER'S NECK FEATHERS.

THEY WRAP THEM AROUND
THE SHAFT OF THE HOOK

ON TOP OF THE NYLON THREAD.

THE DIFFERENT-COLORED FEATHERS
BLEND TOGETHER.

THE FILAMENTS PROJECT
FROM THE HEAD OF THE HOOK

TO DISGUISE IT.

WORKERS WRAP THEM
WITH MORE NYLON THREAD

TO SECURE THEM IN PLACE.

HERE, A DECAL IS APPLIED
TO A DIFFERENT STYLE OF LURE

CALLED A SPINNER

BECAUSE IT SPINS
LIKE A DISCO BALL,

REFLECTING LIGHT
TO ATTRACT A FISH.

THE FINAL STEP IS TO ATTACH
THE HOOK TO THE LURE.

DEPENDING ON ITS COMPLEXITY
AND NUMBER OF PLATINGS,

A LURE TAKES BETWEEN 45 MINUTES
AND TWO HOURS TO MAKE.

THAT'S A LOT OF SPECIALIZED
TIME AND EFFORT FOR FISH BAIT

THAT'S NOTHING SHORT
OF ALLURING.

CAPTIONS PAID FOR BY
DISCOVERY COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

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