Gunsmoke (1955–1975): Season 1, Episode 33 - Prairie Happy - full transcript

Matt tries to quell rumors of a planned Pawnee attack.

ANNOUNCER:

Starring James Arness
as Matt Dillon.

When a man gets so scared
he stops thinking



and goes into a panic,

the chances are he'll
get himself killed fast,

and that's a bad thing
to watch.

But when a whole town
full of people take fright

and start milling around,
ready to stampede,

that really scares you.

What can one lawman do

against a couple of hundred
armed-citizens

about to cut loose
and start blasting

anything that moves?

It's no easy job,

and I sure wish
it wasn't mine.



Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal.

That kid's shooting pretty high
for rabbits, isn't he?

Yeah.

Something must have
those people on edge.

What'd I tell you about
staying in the wagon?

But I see something moving.

Behind them trees.

I'm sure it was Indians.

Get back
with your ma.

Hey, mister.

We're coming out,
mister, uh...

How 'bout, uh,
talking this over?

Come on!

Say, you're Marshal Dillon,
ain't ya?

I'm sorry about my boy
miscalculating you gentlemen

for Indians.

Indians?

You been having Indian trouble?

You mean, you ain't heard?

Been over in Hays
delivering a prisoner.

Been gone a whole week.

Well, folks all over the hills

are packing up and heading
into Dodge for safety.

Pawnees,

big war-party
in a rampage.

Riding and killing
everything in sight.

The Pawnees are peaceable.
They have been for some time.

Good many of 'em even gone
over to Custer as scouts.

All I know
is what I hear.

Why, even the folks in Dodge
are scared sick.

The governor's sending guns
and ammunition.

Come on, Chester.

Oh, and, uh, you better tell
that boy of yours

to see what he's
aiming at next time

before he starts shooting.

We just received
over 100 stand of arm

and 7,000 rounds
of ammunition.

So if you wanna
kill an Indian,

just keep lining up
and signing the receipt.

Now, Mr. Botkin will see
you get your firearm.

Boarding up them windows...

I tell you,
it's the government's

milk-and-water policy
that leaves these savages

free to roam
the plains this way.

But when they come,
we'll be ready for 'em.

In the meantime, you see
an Indian buck or a squaw,

shoot and worry
about it later.

It's the only way to-

I'm heading
back to Saint Louis.

Hey, the marshal's back.
I'll be right with you.

Marshal!

Marshal, we gotta plan
our strategy real fast.

The Pawnee are all set
to attack Dodge tomorrow.

And what makes you
so sure, Jonas?

Oh, these reports
from all over.

You know how news travels.

Who told you about the Pawnees
being on the warpath?

Oh, I don't know
it was any one person.

It hardly matters.
It's general knowledge.

Have you got any plans,
marshal?

Not at the moment, no.

Well, you better
start thinking.

The mayor made me head
of the defense committee

with Botkin and Oliver.

Look, marshal, we gotta
protect our property and-

And our women
and our children.

Panic is not the answer.

Well, you can't blame folk
for being skittery.

Now, look, somebody's to blame
for getting everybody

so triggered up around here
they can't think straight.

I don't think
I like your attitude.

We're looking for you
to call a meeting

to get things organized.

As head of the defense
committee, I'm going-

You're not going
to do anything, Jonas,

until I tell you.

Chester, take the horses over
and get 'em a feed of grain.

We sure got a lot
of excitement around here.

Yeah. A little too much.

Well, maybe there's
something to it.

When you're through
at the stable,

you mosey around town.

See if you can get
one straight answer

as to how this scare got started. Yes, sir.

I'll see what I can
find out in the saloons.

Just wait'll you see it.
Here.

Man, ain't that a beauty?
Huh?

I've already bored me
some loopholes

in my front door.

I'm just gonna stand there

and knock off them red devils
one by one.

Come on, Sam,
let's have another drink.

Well, I've been seeing these
new-hatched Indian fighters

in every saloon
on Front Street.

How come you're not armed,
Kitty?

Should I be?

You mean to say,
you're just gonna let

those Pawnees ride off
with you?

You're not even gonna struggle
a little bit?

Oh, I'm safe.

Why, Dodge is just brimful
of heroes these days.

You know, maybe I never
gave you enough credit.

For what?

You got more sense than anybody
I've talked to today.

Heh, well, thanks,
but, uh, you know,

when you're used to handling
Texas trail hands

every night of the week,

it takes more than a little talk
to scare you.

I lived with 'em.
I know.

They love dying
more than you love living.

They-
They take white scalps

and they starch 'em up
with fat and paint.

And they wear 'em
for horns.

And then they come at ya.

In wolf skins,
screaming.

And thirstin'
for blood.

Hungry for human gore.

One time,

I went on
a scouting party

with the Pawnees
against the Sioux.

When we found the Sioux,

they were encamped
down in a valley.

And they had one brave
standing on a hill.

Looking out over the whole...
Who is that old fella, Kitty?

Well, we snuck up on 'em.

Don't think I ever saw him
around Dodge before.

Oh, he calls himself Tewksbury
or something, I don't know.

Brags he hasn't had a bath

since he was
with John Fr?mont in '42.

...behind that Sioux,

and then:

Whoop!

He cleaved his head
clean through with a tomahawk.

I'm telling you,
can't trust an Indian...

I think I'll have a talk
with him.

Shouldn't be hard.

...they got sharp tongues
and evil ways.

Sam?

Beer for Mr. Tewksbury.

He only shuts up
for straight whiskey.

All right.

Heh. Just, uh,
hold it in my mouth

and kind of sweeten
my breath.

Now, tell me,
Mr. Tewksbury,

you sound like you know
a lot about the Pawnees.

Lived with 'em.

Pure savages.

Whatever you do tomorrow,

don't you let 'em
take your life.

They take a man,

and they spread-eagle him
and then:

Oh. Thank you.

Not bad...

what there is of it.

Tell me, Mr. Tewksbury, uh,

where did you hear
about these Pawnees

being on the warpath?

Heard about it?

Everybody's heard about it.

I know.

You lock the women
and the children in the church.

Give them enough guns
so they can kill theirselves,

worse comes to worse.

Who was it told you
about this raid?

I got ears.

It's common knowledge,
ain't it?

When's the big defense meeting
gonna be, marshal?

Well, I'm sure
that will be...

common knowledge
soon enough.

They always attack at dawn.

They figure

that their spirit
wanders forever

if they die
at night.

They don't mind dying,
mind ya.

But it's gonna be daylight.

Mr. Dillon,
I don't know any more

than I did
when we got to town.

I've asked everybody
in Dodge

how this Pawnee business
got started,

and then all you get's
the same answer:

"I heard tell"
or "Somebody told me" or...

Or "It's common knowledge."
Yeah.

I'm overlooking
your upshot attitude, marshal,

'cause you've been away.

We want a strategy meeting,
right here and now.

After all, we-
We don't have much time.

Now, you men listen to me.

All of you.

You know what panic is?

It's fear.

But a man can be afraid
and still think straight.

But when he gets panicky,
he stops thinking

and begins acting like
you men are acting right now.

Like cattle at a stampede.

We didn't come here
for no lecture, marshal.

No, we gotta figure out
what to do.

It's your job as marshal
to take over.

If you don't, then the blood
will be on your hands.

Blood?

Any of you ever seen
a Pawnee massacre?

That's when the blood flows.

I know. Lived with 'em.

Well, maybe you men
can answer me one question.

You should be carrying
the attack to them, marshal.

You get your men together
and swoop down on 'em.

I know their signs.
I'll lead you right to 'em.

Would you shut up,
Tewksbury?

Now, have any of you men
ever heard

of a Pawnee
or any other Indian

telling anybody
when they were going to attack?

Well, all right, then.

How is it
that everybody in Dodge

knows they're gonna hit us
tomorrow morning?

You're wasting time with all
these questions, marshal.

Tewksbury,

when did you get in
to Dodge?

Uh, about a week back.
Somewheres then.

Mm-hm.

Well, you know, it's too bad
that you didn't keep on moving.

Let me tell you something.

If you don't stop
riling people up,

I'm gonna throw you in jail.

You can do your spouting
in there.

Now you ain't got no call
to talk to him that way.

He- He's an old man.

He's not so old he couldn't
start a rumor like this

and enjoy seeing you people
make fools out of yourselves.

Don't listen
to him!

Don't let him
get yourselves killed.

Now, have any of you men

seen any Indians
anywheres near Dodge

that looked like
they were on the warpath?

You know,
the way you talk,

nobody would think
you was marshal here.

And you know,
the way you talk, Jonas,

it's kinda hard to figure out
what you're most interested in:

defending Dodge
or exterminating Indians.

Now, you heard him, boys.

He turned us down.
Remember that for the record.

I am advising you men
to go on home.

Calm down
your womenfolks.

And stop talking
about Indian raids.

Good night, gentlemen.

Mr. Dillon?

Mr. Dillon, there's a fire
broke out on the edge of town.

A fire at old Ira Danvers'
rooming house.

Is it bad?
Oh, it's got a big jump.

Don't look like the fire wagon
will be able to do much good.

But that ain't
the worst of it.

They found arrows around it,
Pawnee arrows.

Maybe you'll believe me now,
marshal.

Sorry, Ira, doing our best.
Just couldn't get here in time.

I found 'em sticking in
the ground out yonder, marshal.

Well, they're Pawnee.

You all right, Danvers?
I got out of the house

with my skin,
but that's all.

Must have stood on the hill
and fired with burning arrows.

Look, they shot them in
to let us know who done it.

Well, I'm going home,
look after my family.

If you ask me,
this fire's a decoy,

so they can attack
somewheres else.

Marshal, ain't you ever
gonna wake up?

Come here, Chester.

Look,
I want you to scout around

and see if you can find
old Tewksbury.

He was here
just a few minutes ago.

What'll I do
if I find him?

Just keep your eye
on him.

Danvers,

did you see anybody prowling
around before this happened?

I was sitting here
having a quiet drink.

Must have fell off
to sleep about 1:00.

Didn't hear a thing.

I see.

I got a couple of cowboys
boarding with me,

but they was out having
the time in town.

Heh, lucky for them.
Now, look, marshal,

we want some action.

Them Indians could be
riding on us any minute.

No Indians are going
to attack in the dark, Jonas.

Well, what about them arrows?
That's proof enough.

And why would they set fire
to just one house?

Well,
you figure that out.

All right,
boys!

Follow me now!

I'm gonna give
the orders.

Now I want some of you to get
over there and stand guard,

then we gotta
round up some horses.

Mr. Dillon! Come here, quick!

Bring me the water wagon
over here!

Old Tewksbury done it,
Mr. Dillon.

Where'd he go?
He went scootin' off

in that direction.

Hurry up
with the water!

It's no use, Tewksbury.

I'll take that knife.

You'll have to kill me
to get it!

Now don't be a fool.
It's better to die fighting

than to rot of old age.

That sounds like
Indian talk.

You men,

what are you doing
standing there?

Why ain't you out
hunting them Pawnees down?

This is war!

You set Danvers' place on fire?

Sure I did.

I planted them arrows too.

Anything to get
this rabbity marshal to budge.

But he wouldn't listen.

He wouldn't
do anything!

Why'd you try to turn everybody
against the Pawnees?

Wipe 'em out, slaughter 'em.

We'll take care of him,
marshal.

Stay where you are.

White men...

you can't trust.

Indians ain't no better.

Let 'em all die.

Can't figure out
if he's against the Indians

or his own kind.

I'm tired.

I'm awful tired.

I'm all alone.

I said we'd take care
of him, marshal.

Hanging's too good for him.

Now, you listen to me.

You men have made fools
of yourselves.

The whole bunch of ya!

And you didn't need
any help

from this old man here
to do it.

Now, you think
about that.

We gonna have
to take him away from you?

I am taking him
to jail.

I've got no place to go.

I've got no place
to go.

I got no place to go.

We'll give him a trial tomorrow,
the fastest one you ever saw!

You better be ready to hand him
over in the morning!

Poor old fella.

What is it, Mr. Dillon?

Jonas.

We've come for that murdering
old Tewksbury, marshal.

What do you mean,
"murdering"?

Them two cowboys
staying with Danvers.

Well, we just found 'em
roasted to death.

They come home drunk
and went to bed

while Danvers
was still asleep.

Well, I'm sorry to hear that.
That's too bad.

But it doesn't change
anything.

Tewksbury is still going
to get a trial.

I am here to see
the marshal.

You wait.

We've got nothing more
to discuss, Jonas.

Oh, yes, we have, marshal.

We're gonna go get some help
and then we're coming back here.

And when we do,
Tewksbury's gonna hang!

What can I do for you, miss?

What has the old man done?

Why do you ask?

I am Quiet One
of the Pawnees.

The old man, Lost Warrior,
is my father.

A hunter came and told us
he was in Dodge.

Come in.

So you see, miss,
I'm afraid your father

will have to stand trial.

That fire cost
the lives of two men.

Yes.

He must pay.

I know.

Your father tried to stir up war

between your tribe
and our people.

Why?

Well...

many long years,

my father lived like an Indian.

He wished to die like one.

Die in battle.

And be remembered

as a great warrior.

Our tribe...

is peaceful,
marshal.

My father...

taught war
to the young braves.

Our chiefs held counsel

and made strong talk
against him.

Lost Warrior...

left in great anger.

So because he couldn't turn

the Indian
against the white man,

he tried to turn the white man
against the Indian.

He is very old.

His thoughts
are no longer clear.

He doesn't belong to one side
or the other.

It's a tough thing
for any man.

I'll take you to him.

Medicine bag.

His secret
and sacred things.

My father would
want them now.

My daughter.

All will be well now.

Strong medicine

for the warrior
who must prepare himself

to face shame and defeat.

We can...

The Great Spirit
will help me.

I will brush your hair,

Lost Warrior.

This is the last round, boys.

There's plenty of time
to celebrate

after we get through
with Tewksbury.

The way everybody feels
about that old man,

the whole town's gonna
be with us.

Not the whole town,
Jonas.

Maybe Jonas had time
to think, cool off.

The only thing
that'd cool him off

is a six-gun laid
against his skull.

What's that,
Mr. Dillon?

It's the way Indian women
wail in a death lodge.

Hadn't we oughta go
take a look?

Go back to the window, Chester.

Lost Warrior...

is with the Great Spirit Chief.

Medicine in that bag.

Strong medicine,
Quiet One?

Not strong for the young.

But he was...

very old.

I have forgotten

how old.

Lost Warrior died
as he wished:

without shame.

That makes Jonas and a lot
of other people lucky.

They can go on living

without shame.

Give her a hand, Chester.

She'll want to take
her father...

home.

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