Everest: Beyond the Limit (2006–…): Season 1, Episode 5 - Mutiny on the Mountain - full transcript

Team One have summited but the mountain is so crowded with other climbers that they get caught in yet another queue as they attempt to get down. It's turned into a marathon climb of nearly 18 hours with climbers suffering frostbite in the bitter cold. Now it's Team Two's turn at the summit and they set off two hours early in an attempt to beat the queues, but it means an extra two hours in the dark on one of the coldest days anyone can remember. Mark Inglis makes history as the first double amputee to summit, but two climbers who are struggling mutiny when Russell orders them to turn back.

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Narrator:
LAST TIME ON "EVEREST"...

...L.A. MOTORCYCLE DESIGNER
TIM MEDVETZ

AND 62-YEAR-OLD FRENCHMAN
GéRARD BOURRAT

MADE THE BIG PUSH
UP THE MOUNTAIN.

BUT LESS THAN 500 FEET AWAY
FROM THE TOP OF THE WORLD,

BOTH ARE HIT WITH SUMMIT FEVER.

HE JUST DOESN'T HAVE
ANY REASONING SKILLS RIGHT NOW.

GéRARD HAS JUST BEEN MUTE.

AND THAT'S SCARY BECAUSE YOU
HAVE NO IDEA WHAT'S GOING ON.

EXPEDITION LEADER RUSSELL BRICE
MUST TALK THEM DOWN

OR WATCH THEM DIE.



HE DIED BECAUSE HE DID NOT
TURN AROUND IN TIME.

Narrator: MARK INGLIS BECOMES
THE FIRST CLIMBER

TO SUMMIT WITHOUT LEGS.

NOW, ON THE WAY DOWN,

THE DEATH ZONE SHOWS HIM
NO MERCY.

[ COUGHS ]

LEBANESE MOUNTAINEER MAX CHAYA

ADDS EVEREST
TO HIS LIST OF CONQUESTS

BUT DESCENDS
INTO A WORLDWIDE CONTROVERSY

AND A PERSONAL NIGHTMARE.

EVER, EVER, EVER.

EVER, EVER, EVER.

REST, REST, REST.

DAY 47.



7:50 IN THE MORNING.

28,700 FEET.

TIM MEDVETZ IS JUST 350 FEET
FROM THE SUMMIT OF EVEREST

AND STILL REFUSING ORDERS FROM
EXPEDITION LEADER RUSSELL BRICE

TO TURN BACK.

TIM, YOU CAN'T CLIMB A MOUNTAIN
ON YOUR HANDS AND KNEES.

NOW TURN AROUND.

Narrator: WITH TIM
IS 62-YEAR-OLD GéRARD BOURRAT

AND HEAD SHERPA PHURBA,

WHO'S URGING THE FRENCHMAN
TO DESCEND.

EXTREME ALTITUDE
CAN AFFECT BRAIN FUNCTION,

CAUSING SUMMIT FEVER,

AN IRRATIONAL DRIVE
TO REACH THE TOP OF A MOUNTAIN

EVEN IF IT MEANS
ALMOST CERTAIN DEATH.

...AND COME DOWN SAFELY TODAY.

Narrator:
8:00 A.M.

AFTER A NINE-HOUR CLIMB,
TIM COLLAPSES,

TOO EXHAUSTED TO CARRY ON.

NOW GET UP AND GET GOING.

SO GET UP AND START WALKING.

MISSED AN EXTRA HALF-HOUR.

Narrator: TIM AND GéRARD
ARE ON THE SUMMIT RIDGE.

BUT TO REACH THE TOP,

THEY HAVE TO TAKE A LONG DOGLEG
TO THE RIGHT

AND THEN CLIMB A STEEP,
ROCKY SECTION 100 FEET HIGH.

THEIR TEAMMATES,
DOUBLE AMPUTEE MARK INGLIS

AND HIS CLIMBING PARTNER,
WAYNE "COWBOY" ALEXANDER,

ARE NOW ON THEIR WAY DOWN
FROM THE SUMMIT.

LIKE TIM, COWBOY IS A BIKER.

TO THE SUMMIT AND BACK.

TO THE SUMMIT AND BACK.

BUT NOW IT'S COWBOY'S JOB

TO PERSUADE THE FORMER
HELLS ANGEL TO QUIT.

RUSSELL WATCHES EVERYTHING
THAT'S HAPPENING

ON THE SUMMIT RIDGE
FROM HIS BASE AT CAMP 1.

THE SITUATION IS ALSO MONITORED
1 1/2 MILES DOWN THE MOUNTAIN

AT ADVANCED BASE CAMP.

EXPEDITION DOCTOR TERRY O'CONNOR
HAS JUST RETURNED

AFTER SUMMITING YESTERDAY

AND CHECKS OUT THE TOES
HE THOUGHT WERE FROSTBITTEN.

TOES ARE ALL GOOD.
[ CHUCKLES ]

I JUST HOPE TODAY TURNS OUT
ALL RIGHT.

HAVING JUST BEEN UP THERE
YESTERDAY

AND KNOWING WHAT
THE CIRCUMSTANCES ARE LIKE...

YOU KNOW, A LONG DAY UP THERE
IS A BAD DAY, NO MATTER WHAT.

Narrator:
BACK ON THE MOUNTAIN,

RUSSELL HAS ONE FINAL CARD
UP HIS SLEEVE.

HE DIED BECAUSE HE DID NOT
TURN AROUND IN TIME.

I CAN'T DO MUCH ABOUT IT

IF HE'S NOT GOING TO LISTEN
TO US.

Narrator: GéRARD IS STILL
DETERMINED TO REACH THE SUMMIT,

BUT COWBOY WON'T LET HIM.

YEAH, COWBOY.

GOOD FOR COWBOY.

L.A. FIREMAN BRETT MERRELL
AND ASTHMATIC MOGENS JENSEN

HAVE ABANDONED
THEIR OWN SUMMIT BIDS.

BUT THEY REMAIN
AT ADVANCED BASE CAMP

TO SUPPORT THE OTHER CLIMBERS.

Brett:
THERE WAS A BIG PART OF ME

THAT REALLY WANTED HIM
TO SUMMIT, I GOT TO ADMIT.

HE'S GOT
SO MUCH DAMN HEART.

YEAH.

BUT WE ALL KNOW
THE SCORE, MAN.

I DON'T KNOW.
I JUST...

HE JUST DOESN'T HAVE
ANY REASONING SKILLS RIGHT NOW.

Narrator: FRESH OXYGEN BOTTLES
HAVE BEEN LEFT AT MUSHROOM ROCK

600 FEET BELOW.

BUT IT WILL TAKE THEM
NEARLY THREE HOURS TO GET THERE,

AND RUSSELL'S WORRIED
GéRARD WON'T MAKE IT.

Russell: IF YOU'RE A SHERPA,
THEY COULD RUN DOWN

ON WHAT HE'S GOT LEFT
IN HIS CYLINDER

FROM WHERE THEY ARE NOW
AND GET TO MUSHROOM ROCK,

BUT I'M SURE HE CAN'T.

Narrator: UNTIL SOMEONE
CAN GET TIM MOVING,

HE'S PLACING OTHER CLIMBERS
IN DANGER.

TIM'S STALLED AT THE TOP
OF A 10,000-FOOT CLIFF.

TO GET PAST HIM,

OTHER CLIMBERS HAVE TO UNCLIP
FROM THE SAFETY ROPE

AND CLIP BACK IN AGAIN.

ONE SLIP DURING THIS MANEUVER
MEANS CERTAIN DEATH.

YOU ARE SO LAZY.

THE DRAMA IS CAPTURED
ON A HELMET CAMERA

WORN BY PHURBA TASHI.

HE'S BEEN RUSSELL'S CHIEF SHERPA
FOR THE PAST SEVEN YEARS.

PHURBA'S SUMMITED
10 TIMES BEFORE,

AND HE'S NOW TIM AND GéRARD'S
BEST HOPE OF SURVIVAL.

TO GET TIM MOVING,
PHURBA TURNS UP HIS OXYGEN FLOW.

IT GIVES TIM AN ENERGY BOOST

BUT ALSO INCREASES THE RISK
HE'LL RUN OUT OF OXYGEN

BEFORE GETTING TO MUSHROOM ROCK.

CANCER SURVIVOR GéRARD,
THE FRENCH MOUNTAINEER,

REFUSES TO MOVE UNTIL HE'S TAKEN
PICTURES FOR THE DOCTORS

WHO MADE HIS TRIP POSSIBLE.

AT -20 DEGREES,

GéRARD RISKS SEVERE FROSTBITE
BY TAKING HIS GLOVE OFF.

TIM GOES AROUND GéRARD.

IF HE FALLS, HE'S DEAD.

IT'S 8:30 A.M.

RUSSELL BRICE HAS HAD TWO HOURS'
SLEEP IN THE LAST 36,

FIGHTING A LIFE-AND-DEATH BATTLE
TO SAVE CLIMBERS TIM AND GéRARD.

PHURBA, PHURBA,
HE HAS TO GET UP AND WALK.

CHIEF SHERPA PHURBA IS DESPERATE
TO GET THE TWO MEN MOVING.

HE CAN SEE TIM
STARTING TO FALL ASLEEP --

THE FIRST SIGNS
OF SEVERE HYPOTHERMIA.

BUT TIM AND GéRARD
ARE NOT RUSSELL'S ONLY PROBLEM.

MARK INGLIS
HAS STRUGGLED PASSED THEM

ON HIS WAY DOWN FROM THE SUMMIT,

AND HIS ARTIFICIAL LEGS ARE
NOW CAUSING HIM AGONIZING PAIN.

DESPITE HIS STUMPS BEING RUBBED
RAW, MARK MUST KEEP WALKING

BECAUSE A RESCUE THIS HIGH UP
IS IMPOSSIBLE.

500 FEET BELOW,

MAX CHAYA MAKES GOOD PROGRESS
TOWARDS CAMP 4.

MAX HAS PROVED TO BE
ONE OF THE STRONGEST CLIMBERS

ON THE EXPEDITION.

HE SUMMITED AT DAWN
AND IS WAY AHEAD OF THE TEAM,

WHEN HE SUDDENLY STOPS
AND MAKES A FATEFUL RADIO CALL.

Russell:
YEAH, MAX.

Max: OVER.

CAN HE TALK AT ALL?

CAN YOU GET HIS OXYGEN
BACK ON?

YEAH,
I MEAN IF HE'S --

HAS IT GOT
OXYGEN FLOWING, MAX?

YEAH, MAX, YOU CAN TRY
GIVING HIM YOUR OXYGEN.

BUT, YOU KNOW, IT'S NOT
GOING TO GET HIM DOWN THE HILL.

YEAH, MAX.
I KNOW IT'S HARD.

BUT, YOU KNOW,
WHERE DO WE GET ANY HELP?

...FUTURE TO CARRY HIM DOWN
AND GET HIM DOWN.

...JUST WALK ON.

OVER.

[ HISSING ]

Brett:
MAX IS A -- HE'S A GOOD MAN.

I DON'T KNOW.

IT'S EASY FOR ME TO SIT DOWN
HERE ON MY ASS AT 21,000 FEET.

THOSE GUYS ARE UP THERE 28,000,
JUST BARELY HANGING ON,

AND THEN THEY COME ACROSS
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

YEAH, MAX IS A HERO.
HE'S A GOOD MAN.

WE DON'T KNOW
WHAT TEAM HE'S FROM, NOTHING,

AND OBVIOUSLY HIS TEAM MEMBERS
ARE NOT TAKING ANY CARE FOR HIM.

IT'S TOUGH FOR MAX.

Max:
[ SOBS ]

IT'S TOUGH.
I WOULD, TOO.

Narrator:
IT'S BEEN 10 MINUTES

SINCE MAX FOUND THE DYING MAN
IN THE DEATH ZONE.

NOW EXPEDITION GUIDE WOODY
ADDS TO THE DRAMA.

I'M SORRY, MAX.

YOU KNOW, IT'S TOUGH, MAN.

AND, YOU KNOW,
YOU CAN'T DO MUCH WITH HIM.

[ SIGHS ]

BOY, THAT'S GOT TO BE TOUGH
FOR MAX.

Max:
OKAY, RUSS. OKAY.

YEAH, MAX. I'M SORRY.
I'M SORRY IT'S SO HARD.

BUT WE CAN'T DO MUCH, MAN.

Narrator:
IT'S 11:30 ON MAY 15th.

MAX HAS JUST HAD TO LEAVE
AN UNKNOWN CLIMBER TO DIE

BECAUSE NO ONE HAS THE MANPOWER
TO SAVE HIM.

THE TRAGEDY
HAS DIVERTED ATTENTION

AWAY FROM THE CRISIS
OF GéRARD AND TIM,

WHO BATTLE FOR THEIR LIVES
AT OVER 28,000 FEET.

GéRARD REFUSED TO DESCEND
WHEN RUSS TOLD HIM TO.

NOW HE IS STRUGGLING TO GET DOWN
OUT OF THE DEATH ZONE.

IT'S NOT JUST GéRARD'S LIFE
AT STAKE.

THE SHERPAS PLACE
THEIR OWN LIVES IN DANGER

JUST TRYING TO KEEP HIM MOVING.

Russell:
I CAN SEE YOU SITTING THERE.

Narrator: GéRARD'S
GETTING WORSE BY THE MINUTE,

AND THEY'RE STILL 2,000 FEET
INSIDE THE DEATH ZONE.

THEY HAVE NOW CLIMBED
12 HARD HOURS

AND STILL HAVE ANOTHER SIX TO
GO, AS LONG AS THEY KEEP MOVING.

TIM IS FURTHER DOWN
THE MOUNTAIN.

BUT AS HYPOTHERMIA SETS IN, HE'S
GETTING EVER MORE LETHARGIC.

HE SLIPS OFF THE TRACK,

AND ONLY THE SAFETY ROPES
LAID BY THE SHERPAS SAVE HIM.

THE EFFORT OF CRAWLING BACK
JUST DRAINS MORE ENERGY

TIM DESPERATELY NEEDS
TO KEEP GOING.

Russell: YOU NEED THIS ENERGY TO
GET BACK DOWN OFF THE MOUNTAIN.

SMALLER MOUNTAINS, YOU CAN JUST
WALK DOWN AND IT GETS EASIER,

BUT YOU HAVE TO GET
A LONG WAY DOWN EVEREST

BEFORE IT STARTS GETTING EASIER.

Narrator:
AND IF YOU DO SIT DOWN HERE,

YOU MIGHT NEVER GET UP AGAIN.

IF YOU LOOK AT THE STATISTICS,
YOU KNOW THE VAST MAJORITY

OF DEATHS OR BAD ACCIDENTS
HAPPEN ON THE DESCENT.

YOU'RE AT THE END OF A LONG DAY,
THE WEATHER MAY BE SPOILING,

YOUR JUDGMENT MAY BE POOR
WHILE YOU'RE UP THERE --

THINGS LIKE THAT.

AND SO THERE'S A RECIPE FOR
DISASTER, REALLY, ON DESCENT.

[ BREATHING HEAVILY ]

YOU GOT A 240-POUND GUY
WITH POOR MOBILITY, HYPOXIC,

RUNNING OUT OF OXYGEN,
STUMBLING.

IF HE WOULD'VE MADE IT
TO THE SUMMIT,

HE WOULD'VE TOOK
SOME PICTURES UP THERE,

FLEW HIS FLAG,
AND DIED ON THE WAY DOWN.

Narrator: TIM AND GéRARD
MAKE IT TO MUSHROOM ROCK

AND FRESH SUPPLIES OF OXYGEN.

BUT THEIR ORDEAL
IS FAR FROM OVER.

THEY MUST DESCEND
AT LEAST ANOTHER 2,200 FEET

BEFORE THEY'RE LOW ENOUGH
TO SLEEP IN RELATIVE SAFETY.

AS MAX AND HIS SHERPA ARRIVE
AT CAMP 4,

HE KNOWS IT'S NOW LITTLE MORE
THAN A PIT STOP.

THE ONLY ONE THERE

IS HIGH-ALTITUDE DIRECTOR
JEN PEEDOM.

MAX MAY BE SAFELY DOWN, BUT HIS
THOUGHTS ARE UP ON THE MOUNTAIN.

THERE ARE ALMOST 200 DEAD BODIES
ON ITS SLOPES,

MANY IN PLAIN VIEW
OF THE CLIMBERS.

EACH YEAR, THAT NUMBER GROWS.

[ BLOWS NOSE ]

Narrator:
AS MAX SPEAKS,

PHURBA AND GéRARD PASS
THE DYING CLIMBER.

PHURBA SPENDS
25 PRECIOUS MINUTES

TRYING TO HELP
THE SEMICONSCIOUS MAN.

BUT HIS PRIORITY HAS TO BE
TO KEEP GéRARD MOVING.

HAVING DONE WHAT HE CAN,
HE MOVES HIM ON TOWARDS CAMP 4.

AT LEAST MAX'S DAY IS CLOSE
TO AN END.

BUT HIS MIND IS BURDENED

KNOWING TIM AND GéRARD REMAIN
IN DANGER.

GéRARD IS WITHIN SIGHT
OF THE TENTS AT CAMP 4,

BUT AFTER 13 HOURS,
HE'S IN BIG TROUBLE.

HIS HANDS AND FEET
HAVE LOST ALL FEELING --

THE FIRST SIGNS OF FROSTBITE.

AS MAX STARTS DOWN
TOWARD CAMP 3,

THE WALKING WOUNDED
BEGIN TO ARRIVE AT CAMP 4.

BOB KILLIP,
WHO LEFT HERE 12 HOURS AGO,

HAS OVERCOME LONG DELAYS

IN SOME OF THE COLDEST
SUMMIT WEATHER ON RECORD.

BOB SUMMITED WITH MARK
AND COWBOY, WHO ARRIVE NEXT.

[ COUGHING ]

Narrator:
JUST YARDS AWAY,

TIM MAKES A CRASH LANDING
AT CAMP 4.

[ COUGHING ]

Jen:
COME ON, TIM!

YOU CAN DO IT!

Terry: EVERYTHING IS SO
EXCEEDINGLY DIFFICULT UP THERE,

AND YOUR MARGIN FOR ERROR IS --
IT'S LIKE THE WIDTH OF A HAIR.

I'M JUST KEEPING
MY FINGERS CROSSED

THAT WE WON'T HAVE
TOO MUCH TO DEAL WITH.

BUT I'M EXPECTING TO SEE
A FAIR AMOUNT OF FROSTBITE

OVER THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS
AS PEOPLE COME DOWN.

Narrator:
TEMPERATURES ON THE SUMMIT

HAVE BEEN TWICE AS LOW
AS A HOME FREEZER.

AND BOB FEELS THE EFFECT
ON HIS FEET.

WITH GéRARD'S ARRIVAL,

THE SHERPAS HAVE GOT
EVERYONE BACK TO CAMP 4.

BUT THE FRENCH CLIMBER

HARDLY HAS THE ENERGY
TO REACH HIS TENT,

LET ALONE CONTEMPLATE
GETTING DOWN TO CAMP 3.

IT'S VITAL THAT
EVERYONE GETS DOWN TO CAMP 3,

JUST BELOW THE DEATH ZONE.

AFTER A 14-HOUR,
BONE-NUMBING CLIMB,

THEY'VE STILL GOT THREE
GRUELING HOURS AHEAD OF THEM.

DAY 48.

EVERYONE'S BACK AT CAMP 3 --
EVEN GéRARD AND TIM.

Woody:
HOW DID YOU SLEEP?

YEAH, I SLEPT GOOD.

I SLEPT GOOD.

I JUST CAN'T FEEL
MY LEFT FOOT.

GéRARD, IF YOU ARE READY,
YOU CAN GO, YEAH.

FOR GéRARD
AND THE REST OF THE TEAM,

THE DESCENT TO ABC
WILL TAKE UP TO 12 HOURS.

BUT WHILE GéRARD CAN GET DOWN
UNDER HIS OWN STEAM, MARK CAN'T.

THE SUMMIT ORDEAL

HAS LEFT HIS STUMPS FROSTBITTEN
AND RUBBED RAW.

MARK CAN'T AFFORD TO SPEND
ANOTHER NIGHT ON THE MOUNTAIN.

SOMEHOW, WOODY MUST GET HIM
DOWN TO ADVANCED BASE CAMP

WITH THE RESOURCES AT HAND.

ANYBODY HAVE A ROLL MAT?

Tim: HUH?

A ROLL MAT.

THIS IS A JURY RIG.

DON'T ASK ME EXACTLY WHAT
I'M DOING, 'CAUSE I DON'T KNOW.

I'M JUST MAKING IT UP
AS I GO.

THOUGH I DO HAVE
SOME ROUGH PLAN OF ATTACK.

Russell:
WE ALWAYS KNEW

WE WERE GOING TO HAVE TO HELP
MARK GET DOWN

BECAUSE A MAN WITH STUMPS
WALKING THAT FAR IN ONE DAY,

IN THAT SORT OF TERRAIN
WAS GOING TO BE TOUGH.

SO I'M NOT SURPRISED
THAT WE HAVE TO HELP RIGHT NOW.

Narrator:
TIM VOLUNTEERS TO HELP,

AND YESTERDAY'S MUTINY
IS FORGOTTEN.

Woody:
ALL RIGHT, MARK. YOU READY?

I CAN TAKE THE WEIGHT.

AS THE EXPEDITION LEAVES CAMP,
RUSSELL HEARS THE NEWS

ABOUT THE DYING CLIMBER
THAT EVERYONE'S BEEN EXPECTING.

I CHECKED TODAY
WITH OTHER SHERPAS

WHO WENT TO THE SUMMIT TODAY,
AND...

HE DEFINITELY DIED LAST NIGHT.

Narrator: ONE MEMBER
OF A RIVAL TEAM IS MISSING.

MAX TRIES TO IDENTIFY THE MAN
HE SAW FROM THE PASSPORT PHOTO.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?
BECAUSE THIS MAN IS MISSING.

THE HAIR, I'D SAY YES.

Russell:
IT AFFECTED MAX A LOT,

BUT THAT'S THE FIRST TIME
HE'S SEEN THIS.

BUT I'VE SEEN IT A LOT HERE.

I MIGHT BE A HARD-NOSED
OLD [BLEEP]

BUT THAT'S THE REALITY
OF WORKING HERE

AND WORKING
ON THE SIDE OF MOUNT EVEREST,

AND I WISHED
A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE KNEW THAT

BEFORE THEY TOOK
THAT CHALLENGE ON.

Narrator:
BACK UP THE MOUNTAIN,

THE TEAM IS IN FULL RESCUE MODE.

MARK CAN'T GET DOWN ON HIS OWN,

SO HIS FELLOW CLIMBERS
SLIDE HIM DOWN THE SNOW SLOPE,

AS HE HELPS CONTROL
HIS RATE OF DESCENT.

IF MARK LOST THE USE OF HIS LEGS
ABOVE CAMP 4,

WHERE THE DYING CLIMBER
WAS FOUND,

A SUCCESSFUL RESCUE WOULD HAVE
BEEN NEXT TO IMPOSSIBLE.

TIM IS WIPED OUT.

RUSSELL HAS TO SEND SHERPAS
TO COMPLETE THE RESCUE.

FOR DOUBLE AMPUTEE MARK INGLIS,

TO SUMMIT
WAS A TOWERING ACHIEVEMENT.

BUT NOW IT'S PAYBACK TIME.

IT'S TAKEN A NINE-MAN TEAM
A NINE-HOUR, HARD SLOG

TO GET MARK
FROM CAMP 3 TO CAMP 1 --

A DISTANCE OF LESS THAN A MILE.

MARK'S RESCUE
IS AN EXHAUSTING ORDEAL,

EVEN FROM THIS
RELATIVELY SAFE ALTITUDE.

ANY RESCUE
OF THE CLIMBER WHO DIED

WOULD HAVE STARTED MUCH HIGHER
UP IN THE DEATH ZONE,

PUTTING EVERYONE
AT TREMENDOUS RISK.

Russell:
WELL, I ALWAYS KNEW HE'D DO IT.

I'VE KNOWN HIM BEFORE
HE HAD HIS LEGS CHOPPED OFF.

IT BRINGS A TEAR TO MY EYE
THAT INGLIS CAN DO THIS.

THE SHERPAS ALSO --

THEY'RE VERY PROUD
TO BE PART OF THIS WHOLE DEAL.

THEY'LL GO THEIR
LITTLE BIT EXTRA TO HELP MARK

'CAUSE THEY ADMIRE THIS GUY.

WHOA!

WE'LL SEE SOON.

HE'S NOT FAR AWAY, YOU KNOW?

Narrator: THE TOBOGGAN TEAM
HAVE RUN OUT OF SNOW.

FOR THE LAST FEW HUNDRED YARDS,
IT'S DOWN TO SHERPA POWER.

Mark: ONE?

Woody:
PHURBA. UNBELIEVABLE.

Narrator: PHURBA NEGOTIATES
THE ROCKY, ICY TRACK

WITH 120 POUNDS ON HIS BACK.

DOWN AT ABC, GéRARD ARRIVES

AND NOW CONFRONTS THE DAMAGE
CAUSED BY THE BITTER COLD.

Terry: THERE'S FROSTBITE
WITH GOOD PROGNOSIS --

THAT IS, YOU'RE GONNA KEEP
YOUR FINGERS AND TOES.

AND THERE'S FROSTBITE
WITH REALLY BAD PROGNOSIS,

AND THAT IS, WAIT AND SEE,
BUT WE'RE NOT SURE

IF YOU'RE GONNA KEEP THAT FINGER
OR THAT HAND OR THAT TOE.

Terry:
GETTING CLOSE. ALMOST.

Narrator: FOR NOW,
GéRARD LOSES HIS WEDDING RING,

WHICH WAS BLOCKING THE FLOW
OF BLOOD TO HIS SWOLLEN FINGER.

YES.

BUT NOT...

Terry:
A REALLY BLACK APPENDAGE OR SKIN

IS USUALLY A PRETTY BAD SIGN.

AS FAR AS WHAT WE CAN DO HERE

TO GIVE THEM THE BEST CHANCE OF
KEEPING THEIR FINGERS AND TOES

OR WHATEVER BIT IS AFFECTED

IS ESSENTIALLY REWARM
THE TISSUE --

REVERSE THE PROCESS --
THAW IT OUT.

Man: HELLO, MARK.

Narrator: MARK DOESN'T NEED
ANY LESSONS ABOUT FROSTBITE.

24 YEARS AFTER LOSING BOTH LEGS
BELOW THE KNEE,

HE FACES THE NIGHTMARE
OF LOSING EVEN MORE.

Man:
GOOD DAY, MARK.

BUT HIS SUMMIT DREAM
IS NOW A REALITY,

THANKS TO THE MAN THE SHERPAS
CALL KING OF THE MOUNTAIN.

Russell: THIS IS THE MOST
FROSTBITE DAMAGE I'VE EVER HAD.

THIS IS PART
OF THE OVERCROWDING THING.

HERE WE HAD STRONG PEOPLE

BEING HELD UP
BY INCOMPETENT PEOPLE.

Terry: HE'S GOT
SNOW BLINDNESS, RIGHT EYE.

THIS IS GONNA STING.

THESE FIRST DROPS
ARE GONNA STING.

SOMEONE SAID BEFORE, "IS THE JOB
FINISHED ON THE MOUNTAIN?"

I THINK OUR JOB
JUST STARTED.

AND I'VE SAID BEFORE
IT'S LIKE A WAR ZONE, YOU KNOW?

THIS IS A BIG MOUNTAIN,

AND EVERYONE AT WAR
WITH THE MOUNTAIN.

OH, YEAH.
YEAH. OKAY.

OH, MAN.

Narrator:
LAST BACK IS TIM.

IT'S 8:00.

HE'S BEEN DESCENDING
FOR 12 HOURS.

AND THE EFFORT OF HELPING MARK
HAS DRAINED HIM OF ALL ENERGY.

THANKS FOR THE FOOD.

[ INDISTINCT CONVERSATIONS ]

OKAY?

I ALMOST TOOK THAT TO THE TOP.

100 METERS.

SO CLOSE.

SO CLOSE.

OH, IT'S OKAY.

I MIGHT BE WIPED OUT,
BUT I NEVER LOST MY APPETITE.

OH, BEAUTIFUL.

[ LAUGHTER ]

ED, PLEASE.

Narrator: NO ONE WHO WENT
FOR THE SUMMIT YESTERDAY

HAS ESCAPED FROSTBITE,

BUT TIM GOT OFF LIGHTER
THAN MOST.

HE AND RUSSELL
PUT THE PAST BEHIND THEM,

AS TREATMENT BEGINS
ON TIM'S NUMB FINGERS.

JUST THE TIP.

JUST RELAX, PLEASE.
LET ME HAVE A LOOK NOW.

Tim: RUSSELL MADE THE DECISION
TO TURN ME AROUND.

IT DOESN'T FEEL GOOD, BUT
I GOT A LOT OF RESPECT FOR HIM,

SO I RESPECT HIS DECISION.

WASN'T AN EASY ONE.

TASHI,
DON'T THROW AWAY MY FOOD.

Man: DON'T WORRY.
WE'VE GOT MORE COMING.

THE MOUNTAIN'S
NOT GOING ANYWHERE.

AND I DIDN'T HEAR NO BELL.

SO I'LL BE BACK NEXT YEAR
WITH PHURBA BY MY SIDE.

Narrator:
MAY 17th.

RUSSELL'S TEAM IS PACKING UP
AND HEADING OUT.

WHILE OTHER EXPEDITIONS
STILL STRUGGLE FOR THE SUMMIT,

HIS CLIMBERS
ARE DOWN THE MOUNTAIN

AND SAFE FROM THE STORMS.

RUSSELL'S BIG WEATHER GAMBLE
HAS PAID OFF.

BUT A WORLD AWAY,

A STORM OF A VERY DIFFERENT KIND
IS BREWING.

NEWSPAPERS AND WEBSITES
ARE STARTING TO QUESTION

WHY THE DYING CLIMBER
WAS NOT RESCUED.

Russell: WE CAN'T DO ANYTHING
WITH A MAN LIKE THAT.

IT'S JUST IMPOSSIBLE.

Man: UNLESS YOU COULD SEND
20 SHERPAS UP.

YEAH, BUT WHERE DO YOU FIND
20 SHERPAS, YOU KNOW?

20 SHERPAS THAT HAVE JUST BEEN
TO THE SUMMIT AND...

HOW DO YOU GET 20 SHERPAS THERE
TO CARRY THAT MAN

ON THAT DAY AT THAT MOMENT

THAT YOU'VE JUST FOUND
LYING ON THE SIDE OF THE TRACK?

YOU KNOW, IT'S TOO LATE.

Bob: SOME OF THE PLACES
YOU'RE WALKING,

YOU'RE PUTTING ONE FOOT
50 DEGREES, 60 DEGREES,

AND YOU'RE WALKING
ON AN EDGE LIKE THAT.

HOW IN THE HELL IS ONE
OR TWO MEN -- OR SIX MEN --

GONNA MANEUVER A PERSON
LIKE THAT?

HE HAD TO GET UP ON HIS TWO FEET

AND WALK DOWN TO CAMP,
AND HE WAS BEYOND THAT STAGE.

NO HELICOPTER CAN FLY THIS HIGH.

NO YAK OR ANIMAL CAN GO THERE
TO BRING HIM BACK.

NO HUMAN BEING
CAN CARRY HIM DOWN.

Terry:
IT'S LIKE LOSING A MAN IN SPACE.

I MEAN, I PERSONALLY ACCEPTED
THE FACT

THAT MY BEST FRIENDS
WOULDN'T COME AND SAVE MY LIFE

IF I HAD AN ACCIDENT UP THERE.

LAST YEAR,
THERE WAS A KOREAN EXPEDITION

THAT WAS SOLELY HERE
TO RETRIEVE A BODY.

THEY GOT TO THE BODY.

THEY MOVED IT 100 YARDS
IN FIVE HOURS AND GAVE UP.

Narrator: THE 2006 SEASON
ON EVEREST CLAIMED 11 LIVES,

MAKING IT THE SECOND-WORST YEAR
ON RECORD.

THE DEAD INCLUDE
THE MAN LEFT TO DIE --

A DECISION RUSSELL CHOSE
TO EXPLAIN PERSONALLY

TO THE MAN'S FAMILY.

I CALLED THE FATHER THIS MORNING

AND TOLD HIM THE CIRCUMSTANCES
AND WHAT'S HAPPENED.

I ALSO SAID,
"WE CAN'T GET THE BODY DOWN,

BUT NEXT YEAR, I'LL SHIFT IT
FOR YOU SO IT'S OFF THE ROUTE."

SO, YOU KNOW...

PRETTY HORRIBLE JOB.

AND SO...

[BLEEP]

[ LAUGHTER ]

THE ADVENTURE FINISHES.

IT'S THE END OF THE TRIP.

WE GO BACK HOME.

MARK, WELL DONE.

IT'S A FIRST,
TO GET A MAN LIKE THIS, AND...

IT'S PRETTY COOL.

YEAH.

YOU KNOW, IT DOESN'T WORK...

DOESN'T WORK
WITHOUT ALL THE BOYS.

DORJI.

PODAM.
DANORI.

THEY COOKED FOR YOU
EVERY SINGLE DAY.

PHURBA TASHI AND HIS TEAM
OF NEPALESE SHERPAS...

AND NARWANG
AND HIS TEAM OF TIBET SHERPAS,

WHO WORKED SO HARD FOR YOU GUYS,

WHO PUT THE ROPE AND WHO WORKED
TO GET YOU BACK DOWN.

WHEN YOU DIDN'T TURN AROUND,
PHURBA AND HIS TEAM

WERE RIGHT BESIDE YOU,
EVERY SINGLE ONE.

Tim: THE BIGGEST THING
I LEARNED THIS YEAR --

PROBABLY GETTING TO THE SUMMIT
IS ONLY HALFWAY.

UM...

WE GOT TO THANK THE CLIENTS,
EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU.

FOR THOSE THAT SUCCEEDED,
WELL DONE.

SORRY FOR THOSE
THAT DIDN'T MAKE IT.

I REACHED MY SUMMIT.
I SUMMITED UP THERE.

EVEN THOUGH
I DIDN'T GET TO THE TOP,

I REACHED THE TOP
OF MY OWN MOUNTAIN.

I'M SORRY FOR THE FROSTBITE.

DESPERATELY SORRY FOR THAT.

I THINK I MADE A MISTAKE
TO SEND SOME OF YOU ON THAT DAY.

Gérard:
[ SPEAKING FRENCH ]

AND THE HARDEST PART NOW IS...
TO TUK BAHADUR THAPA MAGAR,

WHO DIED BEFORE WE GOT HERE.

[ Voice breaking ] LET'S THINK
ABOUT HIM AND HIS FAMILY.

WE'VE HAD 166 PEOPLE
ON THE SUMMIT OF EVEREST.

FIRST PERSON WE LOST.

OKAY.

THE ADVENTURE FINISHES.

LETS GO AND GET [BLEEP]

[ LAUGHTER ]

PEOPLE THAT HAVE BEEN
TO THE SUMMIT OF EVEREST,

THEY'RE VERY STRONG
IN THEIR MIND.

ANYONE THAT CLIMBS EVEREST
IS ALWAYS GOING TO GO HOME

AND BE A BETTER PERSON
IN THEIR LIFE.

IT'S A VIEW TO DIE FOR.

PUT ME ON THE FIRST YAK
BACK TO KATHMANDU.

EVEREST WAS A PRIORITY.
IT'S NO LONGER A PRIORITY.

NO, I CAN'T DO IT, AND I DON'T
WANT TO DO IT ANYMORE.

TO STAND ON TOP OF EVEREST
AND TO COME HOME AGAIN

IS A MAJOR TRIUMPH --
A MAJOR TRIUMPH.

Max:
WE WERE THERE.

WE WERE AT THE HEIGHT OF THE JET

THAT WILL BEAR ME THROUGH THE
HEAVENS BACK HOME, HOPEFULLY.

7,500 METERS!
WHOO!

WHOO-HOO!

IF RUSS ASKS ME TO TURN AROUND
NEXT YEAR, WILL I?

[ CHUCKLES ]

NO, I'LL PROBABLY
[BLEEP] HIM OFF

FOR ABOUT A HALF-HOUR THIS TIME.

WHOO!

Russell: I'M NOT KING OF
THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN ON EARTH.

I KNOW THIS VALLEY MORE
THAN MOST WHITE PEOPLE.

BUT YOU'RE NOT KING
ON THIS MOUNTAIN, MAN.

NO ONE'S KING.
ONLY THE MOUNTAIN'S KING.

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