Elinor Wonders Why (2020-…): Season 1, Episode 16 - These Sneezes/Ari's Lucky Shirt - full transcript

While the kids are playing in the forest, Olive lets out a giant AAAA-CHOO. This startles the kids and makes Elinor curious about why we sneeze in the first place. Then, Elinor, Olive and Ari are excited for a big soccer game! In order to make sure he plays well, Ari wants to wear his old lucky shirt.

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♪ Wherever I go ♪

♪ I see things

that I want to know ♪

♪ Wherever I am ♪

♪ I find things

I want to understand ♪

♪ Go and explore

listen and see ♪

♪ Just follow your curiosity ♪

♪ Elinor wonders why ♪

♪ Why do birds sing



and how do they fly ♪

♪ Elinor wonders why ♪

♪ Why do ants march

and where do they hide ♪

♪ There's so much to learn

wherever you turn ♪

♪ Just listen and see

and follow your curiosity ♪

♪ Elinor wonders why ♪

♪ Ask a question

what will you find ♪

♪ Elinor wonders why ♪

♪ Just listen and see

come and wonder with me ♪



>> Whee!

Woo-hoo!

Yes.

>> Ari, why are you jumping

around so much?

>> It's such a nice day.

I just want to run and play.

Whoop.

Whoosh!

>> Well, I loved helping Ranger

Rabbit plant flowers in the park

today.

>> Yeah.

Me, too.

And now we have these extra

flowers that we can plant around

our exploring clubhouse.

>> Yeah.

That was super fun.

But we don't have to go plant

them right now, do we?

>> I guess not.

Why?

>> Because then, we could play a

game of tag, right now.

>> That would be fun.

>> Let's do it.

Who's it?

>> I am.

Ha-ha.

(Giggling)

One, two, three, four, five,

six, seven, eight, nine, 10.

(Everyone giggling)

>> Oh, there he is.

>> Aha.

>> Oh.

(Giggling)

>> Ah!

Aw.

>> Got you.

(Shouting)

>> Whoa.

>> Are you okay, Olive?

(Giggling)

>> Yeah.

>> Well, in that case, tag.

You're it.

>> Ah.

(Giggling)

(Sniffing)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

>> Try to catch me--

Olive?

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

>> Uh-oh.

>> Whoa.

Olive.

Stop that wagon!

(Sneezing)

(Gasping)

>> ARI: Look out!

Sneezing elephant coming

through.

>> Sorry.

>> Hi, Lizzie.

Hi, Mary.

(Sniffing)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

>> Sorry about that, Mrs. Hippo.

(Panting)

>> Oh, no.

>> Whoa.

>> Olive!

(Grunting)

(Frogs croaking)

(Grunting)

>> Phew.

>> You almost went in the pond.

>> Are you okay, Olive?

>> Yeah.

That was quite a ride.

(Sniffing)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

Ah.

>> Those were some huge sneezes.

>> Uh-huh.

I've always had a strong trunk.

(Sniffing)

Oh.

It stopped.

I don't feel like sneezing

anymore.

>> Hmm.

I wonder what made you sneeze so

much, Olive.

>> I don't know.

All of a sudden my nose got

tickly, and I started sneezing

a lot.

>> Hmm.

Did a bug land on your nose?

That maybe made you sneeze.

>> No, a bug didn't land on my

nose.

>> Well, something made you

sneeze.

And my nose gets tickly, too,

before I sneeze.

I wonder why that happens.

What makes us sneeze?

>> How are we going to find out?

>> Hmm.

I know.

Let's learn everything we can

about sneezing.

Is there anything in your nature

book about it?

>> Hmm.

Let's see.

Snails, snakes, snow.

Nope.

Nothing about sneezing in it.

>> Hmm.

Where else can we find out

about sneezing?

>> How about the library?

>> Yes, the library.

Good idea, Ari.

Let's go.

>> Cool.

>> Hi, Mr. Antelope.

>> Well, hello, Elinor, Olive

and--

>> Ari.

>> Wait.

Don't tell me.

I can remember.

(Giggling)

>> It's Ari.

>> Is it...hmm.

Oh, yeah.

Ooh.

Ari?

(Giggling)

>> I'm just joking, Arnold.

Of course I remember you.

>> But it's Ari.

>> Right, Ari.

>> Mr. Antelope, we're curious

to learn everything we can about

sneezing.

>> Ah.

Is it so you can sneeze more?

(Laughing)

>> No.

It's so we can sneeze less.

Today Olive started sneezing a

lot, and it nearly made our

wagon roll into the pond.

>> Do you have any books about

sneezing, Mr. Antelope?

>> If we can learn what makes

animals sneeze, then we can find

out what made Olive sneeze.

>> I see.

Well, sneezing is a fascinating

subject.

I can definitely help you

ah-ah-choose the right book.

(Chuckling) Get it?

Ah-choose?

(Giggling)

>> Let's see.

Hmm.

Oh, good.

The book I'm thinking of hasn't

been checked out for quite a

while, in fact.

That means it's on the shelf.

Walk this way, please.

Here we go.

Books about parts of the body.

The one you want is called All

About Noses.

It should tell you about

sneezing.

>> Thanks, Mr. Antelope.

>> You're welcome.

If you have any questions, I'll

be at my desk.

>> Here it is: All About Noses.

Hmm.

It really hasn't been checked

out in a while.

It's so dusty.

>> I'll fix that.

(Inhaling and exhaling)

(Sneezing)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

(Sneezing)

(Sneezing)

(Everyone sneezing)

>> Ah.

>> Oops.

>> Whew.

Still there.

I sneezed so hard I thought my

nose blew off.

>> We all sneezed this time.

That is so interesting.

>> Well, it started when some

bat we know blew some dust at

Elinor.

>> Sorry.

Didn't mean to blow so hard.

>> That made me sneeze and blow

dust on you, Olive.

And that's when you sneezed and

blew dust on me, and then I

sneezed, which blew some dust on

Ari.

>> And then I sneezed and almost

lost my nose, but didn't.

>> Hmm.

That's it!

It must have been the dust that

made us sneeze.

>> But I'm touching it now, and

it's not making me sneeze.

>> Me, neither.

Maybe it smells funny.

(Sniffing)

(Sneezing)

(Giggling)

>> Ari, you figured it out.

You sneeze when dust gets in

your nose.

>> You're right.

>> I always knew I had a nose

for figuring things out.

(Giggling)

>> Let's go tell Mr. Antelope

what we learned.

>> Hi.

>> The sneeze squad returns.

Did you find the answer you were

looking for?

>> Yep.

We figured out why we sneeze,

Mr. Antelope.

We sneeze when dust gets in our

noses.

>> That's good thinking, Elinor.

Here.

Let me show you.

>> This is a drawing of a dog's

nose and what the inside looks

like.

>> Wow.

>> Cool.

>> Lots of animals, like

rabbits, bats, and elephants,

have noses like this, and they

all work in pretty much the same

way.

When little things like dust get

in your nose, they make it feel

all tickly inside.

That's your body's way of

saying, "I don't like this dust

in here."

So, to get it out, your body

blows it out with a big gush of

air.

That's what a sneeze is.

>> Oh.

It's something the body does all

by itself.

>> That's right.

To keep us safe and healthy with

clean noses.

>> Whoa.

Sneezing is pretty cool.

>> But wait.

Dust made us sneeze here in the

library, but I don't remember

there being dust in the park

when Olive sneezed in the wagon.

>> Well, dust isn't the only

thing that can tickle your nose

and make you sneeze.

Other things can as well.

>> That makes sense.

Hmm.

(Pages flapping)

It says here that dust, getting

a cold and pollen can all make

you sneeze.

>> Uh, wait a minute.

What's pollen?

>> Pollen is the little powdery

stuff that's in flowers.

Wait a minute.

Flowers!

Come on.

There wasn't any dust on the

wagon, but there were flowers,

and flowers have pollen.

You were holding this flower.

(Sniffing)

(Sneezing and trumpeting)

>> It was the flower that made

me sneeze.

>> I can see the pollen on your

nose.

>> We did it.

We figured out what made Olive

sneeze.

>> And we learned why.

When little things like dust and

pollen get in your nose, your

body tries to blow them out.

>> And that's a sneeze.

♪ Your nose is for smelling

and also for breathing ♪

♪ When something

gets in your nose ♪

♪ Like dust or pollen

that gets you sneezing ♪

♪ Achoo, achoo, hoo-hoo

blow it out, hooray, woo-hoo ♪

♪ When something

gets in your nose ♪

♪ You have to get it out

your body goes, "Achoo" ♪

♪ That's what sneezing's

all about ♪

♪ Achoo, achoo, hoo-hoo

blow it out, hooray, woo-hoo ♪

(Everyone sneezing and giggling)

>> Ah.

Well, done, little scientists.

>> Thanks, for helping solve

our sneeze mystery, Mr.

Antelope.

>> You got it.

And thank you for ah-ah-choosing

your local library.

(Laughing)

>> Okay.

It's time to take these flowers

to our exploring clubhouse.

(Sniffing)

(Stifling a sneeze)

>> I'll just stay a little bit

behind these flowers.

(Laughing)

>> Today, let's sing a so-on--

A son--

(Sneezing)

>> Salud!

>> Ha-ha.

Oops.

Let's sing about a scientist who

wondered about sneezes.

♪ Have you ever wondered ♪

♪ Just what happens

when you sneeze ♪

♪ When your sneeze flies

from your mouth ♪

♪ Into the breeze ♪

♪ Well, Lydia Bourouiba

is a scientist who said ♪

♪ "I wonder just how far

a sneeze will spread" ♪

♪ Oh, where, oh, where

do your sneezy sneezes go ♪

♪ Lydia Bourouiba

wanted to know ♪

♪ Do they go up

do they go down ♪

♪ Do they spray

and swirl all around ♪

♪ She tickled lots of noses

so they sneezed right away ♪

♪ She took special pictures

of every spray ♪

♪ She watched each sneeze

in super-slow motion ♪

♪ So she could have pictures of

funny sneeze explosions ♪

♪ Lydia Bourouiba

wanted to know ♪

♪ She found they went up

she found they went down ♪

♪ And spray really far

and swirl all around ♪

♪ Whenever you sneeze

think of the scientist ♪

♪ Who wondered what happens

when you say, "Achoo" ♪

♪ When you say, "Achoo" ♪

(Applauding)

>> Yay!

(Bird chirping)

>> ARI: It's got to be around

here somewhere.

No.

That's not it.

>> Hey, Ari.

What are you looking for?

It's almost time to go play

soccer.

>> Yeah.

We're supposed to practise

before the big game.

>> I know, but I can't go until

I find my lucky shirt.

Ha!

Found it.

>> That is a nice shirt, but

what's so lucky about it?

>> What's so lucky about it?

Do you remember when I got that

big hit in the baseball game

last year?

Or the time that cool bug landed

on my shoulder?

Or that day that Ms. Mole

brought in a yummy cake and it

wasn't even anyone's birthday?

>> Yeah.

Good times.

>> Well, on every one of those

days, I was wearing this shirt.

That's why I call it my lucky

shirt.

Every time I wear it, something

great happens.

>> Yeah.

That was a delicious banana

cake, and you all know how much

I love bananas.

(Grunting)

>> I don't know, Ari.

It looks a little small.

>> What?

Nah.

(Grunting)

I can't move my arms very much,

but it's fine.

I just haven't worn it in a

while.

I'm sure it will stretch out.

Now, let's play soccer.

(Grunting)

(Olive clearing throat)

>> Here you go.

>> Hmm.

I'll also bring a bigger shirt.

You know, just in case.

>> Okay, but we won't need it.

We have my lucky shirt on our

side.

Whoa.

Whoa, whoa.

Who's ready to be a super soccer

goalie?

>> Ranger Rabbit?

>> ARI: No.

I meant me.

Now that I have my lucky shirt,

I'm going to stop every ball.

The ones to the left...

Ha.

...and the ones to the ri--

Oops.

>> Careful there, Ari.

Hi, kids.

>> Hi, Mom.

What are you doing here?

>> Well, there was an animal

on the soccer field that

shouldn't be there, so I came to

take it back to the forest where

it belongs.

>> Ooh.

What is it?

>> It's a cute little baby

garter snake.

(Screaming)

>> Snake?

(Grunting)

Little help, please?

>> Now, remember, kids, if you

see a snake, you shouldn't get

near it unless you're with a

grown-up like me.

>> Are snakes dangerous, Mom?

>> Some are.

This one isn't poisonous, but it

can still bite, so we have to be

careful.

And it's a living creature, so

we should treat it with

gentleness and respect.

>> OLIVE: Look at its tongue

flicking.

Why does it do that?

>> RANGER RABBIT: To smell

things.

Snakes smell with their tongues.

>> Come look, Ari.

>> Uh, that's okay.

I can see it just fine from back

here, thanks.

(Giggling)

>> It's so pretty.

Look at the zigzag pattern on

its skin.

>> Yeah, but its skin looks kind

of flaky.

It's not shiny like snakeskin

usually is.

>> That's a good observation,

Olive.

How do you know that?

>> Oh, I love looking at

pictures of snakes in my nature

book.

They are so cool.

>> Is the snake okay?

>> It's fine, Elinor.

What Olive observed is just a

normal part of growing up for a

little snake like this.

(Whistle blast sounding)

>> Okay, kids.

It's time for our practice

before the big game this

afternoon.

>> Where are you going to take

the snake, Mom?

>> Well, snakes should be deep

in the forest away from where

kids play, and where there is

plenty of food and shelter for

them.

So, I'll drop it off in the

forest near the ranger station.

(Gasping)

>> Can we go watch, Ranger

Rabbit?

>> Yeah.

Can we, Mom?

>> Of course.

How about you go to your

practice, then you can help me

put the snake back into the

forest when you have a break?

>> That would be awesome.

>> Woo-hoo!

>> Great.

I'll be waiting for you at the

ranger station.

>> Thanks, Mom.

You're the best.

>> Just doing my duty as a park

ranger.

Have fun, honey.

>> Bye, little snakie.

>> See you soon.

>> Bye.

All right.

Goalie Ari is ready.

Give me your best shot.

(Grunting)

Whoa.

Ah.

Nope.

Uh, whoa.

>> Ari, your shirt is too tight

for you to move.

Why don't you change it?

>> And lose my lucky shirt?

How are we going to win the big

game?

>> But you haven't stopped any

shots yet.

>> That's because you don't need

luck to practise.

Once the game starts, the lucky

shirt is going to work, and

guess who'll be stopping all

the shots?

>> The tree?

>> No!

This bat right here.

(Giggling)

>> I sure hope so, because Mary

and Lizzie are really good at

soccer.

(Whistle blast sounding)

>> Okay, kids.

Let's take a break and meet back

here later.

>> Ooh.

Can we go to the ranger station

and see the snake now?

>> Yeah.

Let's go see my mom.

We'll be back for the big game.

See you.

>> Wait for me.

Aah!

>> Hi, Mom.

>> Hey there, kids.

Are you ready to help me take

the snake to the forest?

>> We sure are.

>> Great.

The snake is right back there in

the box.

I'll be right over as soon as

I'm done with this recycling

report.

>> Okay, Mom.

>> There's the snake right in

the corner.

>> Wait.

I thought this was the snake.

>> Huh?

Are there two snakes now?

>> Two snakes?

That's too many snakes.

(Laughing nervously)

>> ELINOR: There's one snake.

And there's another one, but

this one doesn't quite look like

a snake.

>> Yeah.

It looks really different.

>> Hmm.

We need more observations.

Thanks, Olive.

This snake looks like it's made

out of paper.

>> Yeah.

It's really thin and there's

nothing inside.

>> This one looks like a real

snake.

But remember its skin looked old

and flaky before?

Now, it looks shiny.

Ari, look.

(Inhaling and exhaling)

>> Ugh.

>> Here.

I'll help you.

>> Whoa.

You're right.

I wonder what happened to its

old skin.

Wait a minute.

Maybe this paper-looking thing

is its old skin.

It must have fallen off.

>> The skin fell off?

How can that be?

Wouldn't it hurt the snake?

>> The snake seems okay with

this new skin, but why would its

old skin fall off?

>> Hmm.

Maybe because it was too tight?

>> Huh.

>> RANGER RABBIT: You kids are

right about that.

>> We are?

>> Yes, Olive.

What you see there is the

snake's old skin, and it did

fall off because it was too

small.

The snake grew and its old skin

didn't fit anymore, so it grew

a new, bigger, skin that would

fit its bigger body just right.

>> Wow.

>> So, its skin just comes off

in one big piece?

>> That's right, Elinor.

This is called moulting.

(Gasping)

>> My Mom says I'm growing

really fast.

Am I going to moult, too?

>> No, Ari.

You have nothing to worry about.

In many animals, like bats and

rabbits and elephants, their

skin grows as the animal grows.

But in other animals, like

snakes, their skin doesn't grow

with them.

Instead they grow a new skin

underneath, and their old skin

falls off.

>> Does it hurt the snake when

they moult?

>> No.

They actually feel much better,

because their old skin was

getting tight and uncomfortable.

>> But what if the snake liked

its old skin?

What if it was, like, its lucky

skin and it did all of these

cool things in it?

>> Ari, growing up is a good

thing, and sometimes that means

we outgrow the things that used

to fit us.

>> I guess you're right.

Maybe it's time to say goodbye

to my lucky shirt.

It doesn't really fit me

anymore.

Do you still have that other

shirt?

>> Now, you'll be nice and

comfy, Ari.

Like a snake with new skin.

(Shouting)

(Giggling)

♪ All living beings

grow and grow ♪

♪ From your head

down to your toe ♪

♪ Some take years

and some one day ♪

♪ Because we all grow

in our own way ♪

♪ When you're a snake

and it's time to grow ♪

♪ There's one thing

that you need to know ♪

♪ Your skin will start

to feel real tight ♪

♪ But don't you worry

you'll be all right ♪

♪ Because your old skin

will moult and shed ♪

♪ And you'll feel good

from your tail to your head ♪

♪ All living beings

grow and grow ♪

♪ From your head

down to your toe ♪

♪ Some take years

and some one day ♪

♪ Because we all grow

in our own way ♪

♪ Woo ♪

>> Welcome home, little snakie.

>> Look at it go.

It can really move now that its

skin fits it just right.

>> Bye-bye, little snakie-snake.

>> Bye.

>> ELINOR: Coming at you, Olive.

>> Oh, no.

(Shouting)

(Cheering)

>> Way to go, Ari.

>> It looks like your new shirt

is lucky for you, too.

>> Oh, I'm lucky, all right.

Lucky to have you two on my

team.

Yeah.

Woo-hoo!

>> Yay!

>> Yeah!