Blue Bloods (2010–…): Season 6, Episode 18 - Town Without Pity - full transcript

Okay, this is it.

We're broadcasting on WQTI,

streaming on WQTI.org.

The name of our live podcast
is Justice Denied.

Our guest is Jeffrey Durning,

distinguished heart surgeon,
philanthropist,

and defendant in one of the most
sensational murder trials

of the decade.

Jeffrey, thanks
for joining us.

Thank you
for having me on, Kathy.

Oh, please,
give me a break.



You know they can't
hear you, right?

I must admit,
I feel a little strange

talking to you.

The last time we saw each other
was a year ago in the courtroom

when I was prosecuting you
for killing your wife Beth.

I'm glad you had
the courage to re-examine

the evidence and come to
a more honest conclusion,

which is more than I can say

for some of your
former colleagues.

Yeah, well,
if he's so honest,

how come you're
hiding from us,

and telling your story on the
air instead of in a courtroom?

The first trial ended
in a hung jury,

so tell me, why do you think



the Manhattan D.A.'s office
is coming after you again?

Maybe because
you killed your wife

and you dumped her body
from a plane over the Atlantic?

Obviously,
the office has had a series

of high-profile disasters.

They're looking for
a rich, white man's scalp

to make up for them.

Of course, now we have
my old friend

Erin Reagan saying
she has new evidence,

but like your wife's body,
no one has seen it.

Police!
Come on, out of the way.

Move! Get out of the way.

Oh, it looks like

we have some surprise
guests joining us.

We're gonna take a break.

Where is he?

Obviously not
on the premises.

Oh, my God,
I hate these things!

Aren't they supposed to shut off
after three minutes?

It's an older model; I guess
the guy didn't get the message

he needed to get it fixed.

Or that he needs to move
the car for street cleaning.

How long has it been here?

A couple days at least, right?

Excuse me, ma'am!

You know whose car this is?

Hey, handsome.

What's it worth
to you?

Well...

My tenant,
Harry Clark.

I keep telling him
he needs a new car.

I know he can afford it.

Would you have
him come down?

I would, if I'd seen him lately.

Ma'am, do you notice that
smell inside your apartment?

No.

But my nose stopped working
years ago.

Too much fun
in the '70s.

You know what I'm saying.

Come we come take a look?

Sure. Come on in.

Ugh.

Ma'am, can you please
wait outside?

Eddie, he's in here.

Oh, he's ripe.

It's been a few days, huh?

Oh.

Poor Harry.

Ma'am, I asked you to wait outside.
Aw.

Is this Harry Clark, ma'am?

Yeah.

Although, come to think of it,

I'm not sure
that's his real name.

What do you mean?

I never saw a bank check
with his name on it.

Always paid the
rent in cash.

And some of his mail came
with different names on it.

Do you have a next of kin
we can contact?

No. No one ever
visited him.

Uh, Eddie, see if you can
find some Vicks.

The smell's starting
to get to me.

I may have some.
Thank you, ma'am.

We're all set, thank you.
Oh.

Well, if you need me
for anything, just call me.

And, you, just call me.

Okay.

Good to see you, Nick.
You're looking well.

Thank you. You, too.

Thanks for this.

Yeah.

How's the family?

Good.

Yours?
Grown up and out.

Your son, kind of a hothead,
whatever happened to him?

Detective, first grade.
Oh.

And the other one,
going to Harvard?

On the job as well,

and my daughter Erin
works for the D.A.'s office.

It's nice having
a family business, huh?

It is.

You know, Frank, when I heard
that you got your father's job,

I was happy
to hear that.

They gave it to the right man.

Thank you.

Tyrell Dawes,
come on in.

Sit down.

You know why you're here?

My parole officer said
I should come by here,

but I didn't have to by law.

This is your Offender
Notification Forum.

We hold them for people
who just got out of prison

with a high risk
of going back.

Come on, man, what do
you got, a crystal ball?

You're a gang member
who just did three and a half

for committing a robbery
with a handgun

in New York City.

Come on, man.

What do you got, an extra
eight-by-ten for my moms?

Turn it over.

What's "15" mean?

if you commit another crime
with a gun.

And that's a hard number;

there won't be
any pleading it down.

It's up to you, Tyrell.

None of y'all know me.

None of y'al know where
I've been or where I'm going.

Yeah, we do.

You want to tell him
or should I?

May I?

I am here for
the same reason that you are,

because the commissioner
asked me to be here,

and because I just finished
a 20-year bid of my own

in the state prison.

I could still be in that prison.

I killed someone
who threatened my family.

Commissioner Reagan,
who at that time

was Detective Reagan,

could've buried me.

But he didn't.

He gave me a fair shake.
So I listened to him.

Man, is this real?

Every word.

Look at this.

They're all $100 bills. There's gotta
be ten of thousand of dollars in here.

Eddie, I wouldn't be
touching that.

"Dear Sandi, I am so sorry
about everything.

Maybe the rest of this money
will help."

What's he got
to be sorry for?

Yeah, and who was he?

♪ Blue Bloods 6x18 ♪
Town Without Pity
Original Air Date on April 1, 2016

== sync, corrected by elderman ==
@elder_man

What do we got?

Four wounded.
One serious and likely to die.

Shootout inside the diner.

One of the rounds went
through the front window.

The likely is
an Alex Kalamogdartis.

Kala-what?

I don't know,
it's Greek.

Okay, what about
the other three vics?

Two of them
were other customers,

and the third was a 12-year-old
boy walking by outside

with his family.

Don't ask me
to pronounce his name.

Okay, so we got a gang war at
a greasy spoon. Any witnesses?

Well, no one's talking about
why it jumped off tonight.

We do know this Alex
may have had a dispute

with the management.

Any actual witnesses
to the shooting?

Not so much.
Hey, boss.

Everyone's saying how it was
too dark to see anything.

Too dark in a
brightly lit diner?

Well, they've been
renting it out

as pop-up nightclub
sometimes.

The current owner
is over there,

Stavros Constantine.

Hey, Stavros.

Hey! Want to tell us
what this is about?

I mean, I have no idea.

We've never had any trouble
on club nights before.

Oh, well, can't imagine
people shooting your place up

if all you're doing
is serving moussaka.

Listen, I'm as confused
as you are, okay?

One minute, I'm in the back

making sure we got enough
champagne for bottle service,

and the next,

bang, bang, bang, it's all hell
is breaking loose.

So you're trying
to tell us

you don't know anything
about this Alex Kala-what?

...mogdartis.

Kalamogdartis.
Yeah, yeah, of course.

Of course I know
Alex Kalamogdartis.

It's like the Trojan War
with our families.

What's that mean?

He's been trying
to take over our diner.

Mm-hmm.
But he's been doing that

to a lot of local businesses;
he's a thug.

And you have no idea
who shot him.

I'm afraid I-I can't help you.

Can't or won't?

Okay, well,
we're gonna assume

that you don't have
a cabaret license

for this little nightclub
of yours,

so here's what we're gonna do.

You're gonna get your hands
out of your pocket,

and then you're gonna
take a ride with us.

See if that jogs
your memory. Come on.

So what?

Now that the supervisors
have been and gone,

we just have to sit here,

safeguard the place until
the public administrator

comes and starts to try to make
inventory of all this?

Real-life police work, Eddie.

It's not all
paperwork and donuts.

You know, we turned over
a lot of money yesterday,

and there's still
no next of kin.

Some of this junk lying around
might be worth something.

Bosses just want us
to keep an eye on it

till things get settled.

Yeah, well, hey, can we
open a window, please?

The guy's gone,
but that stink is

very much still here.

You know,

Harry must have been
hiding from something.

Or someone.

Sounds like he's been
locked up in this apartment

the last 25 years.

Hey, Jamie,
do you remember

the New York
Benefactors' Trust robbery?

1992, $21 million stolen.

Yeah, biggest heist
in the city's history.

Most of it never recovered.

Keep finding all these clippings
that Harry kept about it.

Jamie, you don't think...

Should we order first
or argue first?

I'm happy to get
business out of the way.

We have an arrest warrant
for Jeffrey Durning,

and I want to know
where he is.

What if I told you I don't know?

Except that he's somewhere
in Europe.

I wouldn't believe you.

This isn't about me.

It's about the facts
of the case.

Right after the trial,

I started hearing from witnesses
that Beth might still be alive.

She was a very
unstable woman, Erin.

We are going to retry this case.

We just need him
back in custody.

Obviously, you're worried
about losing this case

in a court of public opinion
before it goes to trial.

If you have new evidence,

why don't you come on my show
to talk about it?

How about this?

I have you subpoenaed and
brought before the grand jury,

and if you don't answer the
questions, I will ask the judge

to hold you in contempt.

You'll never win.

Classic First Amendment case.

But I don't have to
tell you that, do I?

Good luck, Erin.

I guess I wasn't
all that hungry anyway.

But maybe you are.

You weren't 100% honest with us
last night, were you?

What do you mean?

I think you had more than

breakfast, lunch and dinner
on the menu.

Alex K is a known
drug dealer.

He came to your place
with a beef.

Now, you're trying
to tell me

that if we bring the dogs in,
they're not gonna find anything?

I'm no drug dealer.

I run a family business.

Okay, well, maybe you wouldn't
let him sell drugs in your club,

and that's why he had a beef.

Come on, help me
understand here.

Finally got a couple
of witness statements

and a photo from
a parking lot camera.

Good work.

Hmm.
What's up?

You know, I'm thinking,
if you didn't fire the shots,

then you definitely know
who did.

Who's this?

I don't know.

You want to keep your business?

You're gonna take another look

and give me an honest answer
this time.

Come on.

Come on! Who is it?!

It's my father.

Nick Constantine

is hardly a friend;
I arrested him once.

Not just that.

Your testimony at his trial...

Was entirely truthful.

And helpful to the defense.

And now that
same person

was present, arguably
with motive, at the scene

of a shooting and
can't be found.

Am I, in some way, suggesting

we give him a head start?
No, boss.

Then what's your point?

That old media has
handed down the perception

that you pulled punches
when you testified at his trial.

And two days ago,
he was at your side

at an
Offender's Notification Forum

in the role of model ex-con.

I tell you what,
you manage the perception,

I'll manage my department.

Less than a month ago,
you came out strong

against the mayor's
Fresh Start program.

This isn't that.

Not your call,
all due respect.

You need to distance yourself
from the appearance

that you've put your eggs
in the Nick Constantine basket.

A man does a wrong thing
once in his life,

in this case,
for the right reason.

There is a part of me

that believes that there can,
in fact, be a chance

for a second act
in people's lives.

Any idea where he's headed?

We're tracking friends,
cell records and credit cards,

but after 20 years,

he doesn't have that much
of a network to plug into.

Which means
he can't be that far.

Let's make it clear

that we're devoting
all our resources

to hunting him down
and making sure he pays.

In other words, grandstand
before all the facts are in.

Is he even the prime suspect?

Well, he's more than
a person of interest.

Then let's just find him.

Yeah. Yeah, thanks.

Public administrator's
gonna be another day.

They are backed up
and understaffed.

Well, Jamie,
I just found more cash.

Shouldn't we tell

major case
this could all be connected

to that bank robbery?

I already put a call in.

It's no longer
an active investigation.

All the robbers
are either

dead or in prison,
and the bank went under

in the crash of '08.

We got no reason to think
that Harry was involved

other than the clippings.

This cash could be legitimate.

Well, then where did
all the money come from?

Doesn't look like
this guy's had a job

in a really long time.

And why all this
dog stuff and no dog?

Hey, we just walked in your
apartment, what would we find?

Some laundry that
needs to be folded,

couple unpaid bills, maybe
something in the DVD player

I'd rather nobody find out.

Really?

The Little Mermaid.

Oh.

Jamie, I don't know.

Part of me thinks this could be
an integrity test by IAB

to see what we would
actually do.

Do you know how crazy
that sounds?

Can I help you?

Officer Jamie Reagan?

You left
a message for me.

About Harry Clark.

I'm Sandi Harper.

This is
my grandson, David.

You knew him?
He was a friend?

I knew him.

I wouldn't say
he was a friend exactly.

He just sent me money.

Mindy, I don't know
what this is.

You gave us a statement
that Jeffrey told you

about killing his wife,

and now you're just
trying to take it back?

Jeffrey came to visit me
the other night.

At my apartment.

He's still in town?

He heard that I was helping you

and telling you the things
that he said about Beth

and how she disappeared.

Did he say
how he heard?

It sounded like he had a source
that knew people at this office.

He said that
I could disappear, too.

Just like Beth.

He directly threatened you?

He made it clear
that it wouldn't be good for me.

He called me
his little shark bait.

Like it was a joke.

And then he left.

He thinks you guys
will never find him.

I understand you're scared,
but we need your testimony.

Otherwise, he's gonna go out
and do this to someone else.

Seriously?
Like this is my fault?

I tried to tell you people
about this before,

and you wouldn't believe me.

You tried to tell who?

The prosecutor
who had this case before you.

Kathy Elliott.

Traffic camera
last spotted Nick's car

at this intersection.

You see anything yet?

This is it.

This is the car
Nick was driving.

Of all the places

he could be hiding out,
and he chooses a diner?

Well, it makes sense.

He's probably hungry,
doesn't have a lot of cash.

Go with what you know.

Like a married guy
who divorces his wife,

then marries
the same kind of girl.

Shouldn't we call it in

and wait for backup?
No.

We're not gonna let him
run out on the check this time.

You go that way.

Excuse me.
I need you to follow me.

Nick Constantine.

How the hell you been?

Remind me.

Danny Reagan.

Think you know my old man.

Right, Danny.

The hothead.

How you doing?

Maybe we should talk outside.

Why would I do that?

Everybody out of the diner.
Let's go.

Let's go. Come on. Come on.

You know, Danny,

at my age...

...I'm not going back to prison.

We can do this the hard way
if you want.

But I think
you might've caused

enough pain
for your family already.

If... if I come with you,

quietly...

it's on one condition.

I'm listening.

I talk to Frank.

Nobody else.

Just Frank.

I'll see what I can do.

What's the old man doing?

Talk to him.

I got word your suspect
wanted to speak to me.

Yeah, he asked.

And I didn't say yes.

Why not?

I don't typically offer up
the commissioner's time

as part of my deals.

I'd like to make an exception
in this instance.

Well, since when
do you come down here

because a suspect asked you to?

Can't think of
the last time I did.

Look,

I know he's your collar,

and you certainly don't
need my help, Detective.

You're as good as I got, but...

...he was my collar first.

I have to know.

Well, he's in the box.

It might be better
if I talked to him in here.

Okay.

Thank you.

By the way,
the gun we found on him

does match the one
used in the murder.

The coffee at our diner used to
be the best coffee in the city.

There's no
chain places,

one supplier for all
of the diners in town.

No special bean that
comes out of a cat's ass.

I didn't come down here
to reminisce about coffee.

Hmm.

Alex Kalamogdartis.

He was not
a nice young man, Frank.

Well, he died this morning.

And "not nice" is not grounds

for a justifiable homicide,
Nick.

Rotten apple from a rotten tree.

Come on, the kid had a record
as long as the old man.

I know that.

Tell me what happened.

I got nothing to tell.

I'm at my family restaurant,

celebrating my freedom.

In walks the kid.

Hot and bothered,
stirring up trouble.

Just like his old man.

Next thing I know,
bodies are falling.

Who fired the shots?

I don't know;
it was dark, it was crowded,

music was loud.

Why do we have

this picture of you
leaving with the gun?

I wasn't thinking, Frank.

I panicked when I saw
the gun on the floor.

All I could think was
I got to get it out of here.

You got a problem,
or does the problem have you?

You trying to cover
for somebody?

Not at all.

Like, maybe you got used
to life inside,

had it wired pretty good.

You're dead wrong.

I'm not covering for anybody.

Right, and you have no idea
who the shooter was

in your own restaurant,
with your own people around.

Nobody saw nothing.

Where was your boy
when this happened?

In the back.

Who with?
I don't know.

I gave you the benefit
of the doubt once.

You owe me the truth.

I paid my debt
to the State of New York.

20 years.

I gave it 20 years of my life.

I don't owe anybody
anything else.

Not good enough.

Start over.

That's Harry.

With my late
husband David.

Two of them were
thick as thieves.

Drinking and gambling every
night at the Old Bluff.

Sandi, you said that you weren't
friends with Harry,

but he kept sending you money.

Why?

Oh, I don't know.

Maybe he felt sorry for me

because I had to raise
my grandson on my own.

The child has
special needs.

He's smart.

And he was doing well
in the program I sent him to.

That school
they had him in?

Full of screamers
and head bangers.

How much was Harry sending?

Are you gonna tell the IRS?

No.

Never more than ten grand.

Every few months.

Now the program says
David can't come back

until I pay the next bill.

Sandi, I hate to ask you this,

but that's a lot of money for
a guy that didn't have a job.

Do you know anything about
Harry's involvement

in the Benny Trust heist?

That's where my husband worked.

What did he do there?

He was a guard.

The guard who got killed
in the robbery?

The bank got their money back
from the insurance,

and then went under before
they paid our benefits

like they promised.

Harry was the only one
looking out for us.

Did you ever ask
where he got the cash?

No.

But I knew something
was eating him inside.

And they always said

the robbers must have
had an inside tip.

You think Harry was the conduit,

because he was drinking buddies
with your husband?

He sure acted guilty around me.

You think he got
a cut afterward?

I don't know.

I needed the money.

For my grandson.

I guess you got
a judgment about that, huh?

I don't know what to think.

So what happens now?

Hey, Reagan.

What the hell
do you want?

I heard you had
my father here.

Yeah. Well, unless you got
something new to offer

that you held
back on before,

there's nothing you can
do to help him now.

Wait.

I think you're gonna
want to hear this.

Okay.

Come on.

Whew.

We're good to go?

GPS is working.

We good with the warrant?
Just in time.

Judge says,
"Kathy's her own worst enemy."

If she wasn't pushing this--

a live video interview
to drive up ratings--

we wouldn't have probable cause
she was meeting with Jeffrey.

There she is.

Can't believe
she's doing this.

She was one of the best trial
lawyers I ever worked with.

One thing about Kathy,
she was always more about

the attention
than the case.

Let's go.

Please, don't complain
about the driving today.

No promises.

My father's
the strongest man I know.

I can never be like him.

Okay.

He did 20 years in state prison,

and he never complained
about the food.

After being in
the restaurant business.

No, he...

he deserves to have
his life back.

He only just met
his granddaughter.

I'm sure this is all
going someplace.

When Alex Kalamogdartis

came in the other night
and started threatening him,

I couldn't take it.

So you're saying you were
there during the argument.

Yes, yes.

I'm sorry that I lied before.

Like I said,
I'm not as strong as Papa.

Okay, we've moved past that.

So you heard Alex threaten
your dad, then what did you do?

I went, I went and I got
my cousin's gun

from under the cash register.

And then what?

And then I just
started shooting.

And shooting and shooting
and shooting and shooting!

After it was done,

Papa took the gun and told me
to keep my mouth shut.

Okay.
I did it.

Yeah.

I'm gonna need you to
write that all down, okay?

My father's still got

a few good years left.

I can't let him go back to
prison for something that I did.

You want a lawyer?

Now? Seriously?

Yeah. It's my right.
I didn't shoot the kid.

You got no right
to keep me here.

You asked for me.

And now you want a lawyer?

It's done.

He confessed.

Full statement?

Signed, sealed and delivered.

Good work.

Stavros...

In English.

Papa, I'm sorry.
Don't do this.

- I already did.
- No, you didn't.

I shot him, Papa.

He didn't give
me a choice.

Take him down
to Central Booking.

Yes, sir. Come on.
Wait a minute.

Wait a minute!
Wait a minute!

I don't think you're gonna
let him do this, Nick.

You're not a perfect man,
but you love your family

and you love your son.

It's how
it had to be, Frank.

Otherwise, those people
were never gonna let us be.

Ready to make
a statement?

Yes, I am.

We got the cuffs
on the wrong man.

Nice ride.
Smart.

Jeffrey knew
we'd be looking for him

at the airfields, so he's
all set to get away by land.

Well, I guess looking back,
I could've seen the signs.

Beth was always
a little flighty.

That was part of the energy
that drew me to her.

She started
disappearing for

longer and longer
periods of time.

And then one night,
she just didn't come back.

You two, sit down.

And shut that off.

On your feet, Doc.
Come on.

Come on!

Looks like this interview
is over, Kathy.

Jeffrey Durning, we have
a warrant for your arrest.

Wait, this is all wrong.

We also have a warrant
for your arrest.

For what?

Hindering prosecution.

You lied to us
about where he was,

and you're assisting a fugitive.

Wait.

There's something
you need to see

that changes this whole case.

Oh, really?

This...

was taken in Caracas

two days ago
by a friend of Beth's.

She's still alive.

Hey.

Hey. Put the brisket
in the fridge.

I got us a bottle of wine;
we're in business.

Grandpa,

do you remember
the Benny Trust heist?

Oh, sure I do.

Happened when I was PC.

We always heard that
it was an inside job,

but we could
never prove it.

Most of the thieves
killed each other

before they could
spend the money. Why?

Just a hypothetical,
but what if I told you

that I found
some of the money?

I'd say forget
the brisket,

you're taking us to Peter
Luger's for family dinner.

Seriously, it's a closed case,
isn't it?

No, the term is "not an
active investigation."

Big difference.

Let's just say
a couple of partners

stumble on a bundle of cash
in a dead man's apartment.

Well, if they take
it for themselves,

they're out of a job and
maybe on their way to prison.

Let's just say though that
they've made all the right calls

and turns out
nobody's looking for that money,

but it's clear
that the dead guy

wanted to leave it to somebody
who really needed it.

He died without
leaving a will?

Yeah.

Well, then it goes to
the public administrator.

What if they just
don't find all of it?

Well, then these partners
have an interesting dilemma.

A few years before the heist,

I was up in the Bronx
for the Big Blackout.

The looting was insane.

We were locking up people
left, right and center.

Someone had broken
the front window

of a store that charged
the most ridiculous prices.

I saw a lady my age,
with three little kids,

carrying out a bag
full of diapers and groceries.

I looked her
straight in the eye...

and I let her go.

I made a
judgment call.

Every good cop's
got to be able to make one.

Not that we're talking about
anything real here.

You sure this is okay?

The public administrators
are already done.

You're the closest thing
to a family friend.

We're just giving you
a chance to pick out

some clothes for Harry,
for the funeral.

No one else is coming?

He had no will,
no heirs.

Just the letter to you.

So, we'll give
you an hour.

Whatever you leave behind
goes to the landlady

or the-the
clean-out company.

Just...

make sure you look everywhere--
the cupboards, the closets...

...under the bed.

I'm still not
sure about this.

Public administrators
got most of the cash

that was just lying around.

We both know there's more.

And no one's looking for it.

Sandi needs that money
to keep her grandson

in that special school.

Just doesn't feel right.

What if someone starts
asking questions later?

Guess you'll have to decide
if you're gonna rat me out.

I can't believe you had me
arrested on felony charges.

Well, you knew
where Jeffrey Durning was

and you chose to mislead us
and protect him.

The flaw in
your argument

is that there is
no underlying crime.

Really?

I've given you proof.

You mean that picture
from Venezuela?

It kind of blows the whole case
out of the water, Anthony,

doesn't it?
One little problem.

I just got off the phone
with the guy in the photo.

He's five-foot-six.

Beth was five-foot-ten.

And in the photo,
she's looking up at him.

How's a woman
who's four inches taller

appearing shorter?

Obviously, it
would be tough.

I'd say.

Doesn't mean I'm wrong
about everything.

You're just trying
to neutralize me

because you're afraid
the former prosecutor

is gonna make Jeffrey's defense
a slam dunk.

What about all the witnesses
Jeffrey intimidated?

Their stories didn't hold up.

Then why did Jeffrey go to
Mindy's apartment the other day

and threaten her?

He's worried the truth
will come out.

I had no idea he'd done this.

You let your ego get ahead
of the facts in this case,

and you've been poisoning
the jury pool with your podcast.

I thought I had a subject
who was innocent.

Is it safe to say

that you could've
handled things differently?

I'll give you what I have
on Jeffrey from my files.

Bless us, oh Lord,
in these thy gifts,

which we are about to
receive from thy bounty

through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Amen.

Ah, the prodigal son.

Better late than never.

What took you?

I texted Erin I was
running a little behind.

He did.

Where were you?

Uh, funeral.

Whose?

Just a guy.

You know him well?

Uh, no.

Actually didn't know him at all.

Turns out, nobody really did.

What's that mean?

Means he barely
came out of his house

or spoke to anyone for 25 years,
and passed away

without anyone really wondering
where he went.

That may be one of the saddest
things I've ever heard.

How deep did you dig?

Didn't really dig, actually.

Just a few days sitting with
his stuff and waiting for

the public
administrators to show.

Did he have something to hide,
something he was hiding from?

No record.

At least not under
any of the names that we had.

Well, maybe he never got caught;
couldn't forgive himself.

Any more of this,

and I'm gonna have to go
back to church

and pray for his poor soul.
Right?

So you actually
went to the funeral

for someone you never met?

Yeah.

Ever done that before?

Nope. Just felt like I should.

That's it?

Yeah, kind of hard to explain.

At least for me it is.

Wow, you give this family
half an opportunity,

and the questions
just don't stop.

Sorry I
brought it up.

Nicky, boys,

you hear a lot of harsh stories
at this table.

I don't think
they're harsh.

Cool, maybe.

Okay, ear of the beholder.

But if there's one thing
you need to take away

from this table, I hope
it's that you don't have to be

Jamie's age, or
Danny's or Erin's

or mine or Pop's
for that matter,

to learn to show some grace
where it's needed.

To save some grace
for strangers even,

who find themselves
without family or friends.

Or whatever reason
got them there.

Will do.
Me, too.

I'll try.

I'd like to think
the reward is in the attempt.

Well, the good news is,

none of us is ever
gonna end up alone.

Not while another one
of us is still standing.

And again, amen.

== sync, corrected by elderman ==
@elder_man