The Amaranth (2018) - full transcript

We like to believe we know ourselves.

Our place in the world.

Our limits.



But boundaries are meaningless in the face of love.

Love makes us heroes.

Love makes us monsters.

Mrs. Kendrick?

Lilly, it's time.

- Mr. and Mrs. Kendrick, welcome.

I'm your Amaranth butler.

- I'm sorry, I didn't catch your name.

- Arthur. - Arthur.

- Yes. - Lilly.

- Nice to meet you.

- Nice to meet you.



- Uh, the floors, they are radiant heated.

Uh, the Lutron System for the lights,

they are sensitive to time, to motion and to season.

The remote, it operates many different features

of the house.

The ic, oh, ma'am, please let me take that for you, ma'am.

- No, that's okay.

- You are sure? - Yes.

- Okay.

- It's okay.

- Thermostats are set at 71 this time of year,

but I can adjust that for your comfort as you wish.

And these can be found throughout the house

to summon me, or any other member of the staff,

but most important for emergency medical assistance.

May I show you the bedroom?

Richard,

Patsy Howard, Director of Resident Services

here at The Amaranth.

Welcome.

Ah, Lilly, wonderful to see you again, Patsy Howard.

I brought you a list of activities,

health and wellness programs, social mixers,

everything you'll need to get into the swing of things

here at The Amaranth.

So, who's ready for new member orientation?

Count me out.

- All right.

Well, looks like it's just us girls then.

The horse stables are just off

in that direction and then over this ridge,

we've got skeet shooting and the rifle range.

Oh, and you know the name Amaranth comes

from a mythical flower that never fades.

Don't you just love that?

Ping pong, shuffleboard, lots of clubs, lots of clubs,

bridge, mahjong, scrapbooking.

I don't get that one, but anyway, swing dancing,

oh I love, this we call our reading room.

We get daily delivery of The Times.

Oh, and our chef, Albert, oh, he is just divine.

We got him from a little brasserie in the south of France.

Don't you tell anyone.

We stole him.

Top of the line equipment, indoor-outdoor lap pool.

Daily classes of yoga, Pilates, spin, you name it, we do it.

Oh, look,

it's round-robin Tuesday.

Oh, guys, keep it movin'.

Tim, you know better!

You're gonna have to get used to that being

the youngest chicken in the henhouse.

- Pardon?

- Oh, sorry, the cutoff age

for residency here at Amaranth is 55,

which is, you know, standard for retirement communities.

- After his stroke, Richard was looking for a place

where we could live independently

and get the medical support he needs.

And also make some new friends.

- Now, no children?

- Richard has two boys and they're thrilled about this.

Removes the guilt.

- Ah-ha, and you?

- I guess I thought after he retired

we'd have more time before we...

- Before you landed in an old folks' home.

Lilly, give it a chance.

There are endless opportunities here for you.

You know, recapture old interests, develop new interests,

make some really, really good friendships.

We should probably head back.

- Of course, but first one more stop.

Our medical facility houses

both our state of the art hospital

and a research lab devoted entirely to anti-aging.

- We need to reschedule

the oblation check Dr. G... - Dr. Campbell?

- Okay, Miss Howard.

You are, as always, the picture of health.

- Ah, thank you. Doctor,

I want to introduce you to the newest member

of our Amaranth family, Lilly Kendrick.

Lilly, Dr. Alan Campbell.

- It's nice to meet you.

- A pleasure, Mrs. Kendrick.

I'll have Mia get you on the schedule

for a complete physical, uh, blood work, chem panel.

- Mm, but there's no need.

I just had my annual checkup.

- Yes, I had your records sent over for review.

You know your LDL is on the high side of normal.

- Dr. Campbell never forgets a lab report.

Never.

- Well, I'd, uh, I'd like our own lab to run a sample.

And you can rest assured your husband

will receive the very best of care here.

- Well, we're off.

Thank you.

So, he's great, right?

- He seems very nice.

But I think where Richard's health is concerned,

we might be happier with someone with more experience.

- Lilly, do not be fooled by Dr. Campbell's modesty.

He has a long list of accolades

from the top universities and think tanks in the country.

- I meant no disrespect.

- That's all right, I'm just sayin',

if you love your husband, you'll send him to Dr. Campbell.

- Everything's perfect.

Oh, no, Arthur, I'll get that.

- Uh, you are sure?

- Yes, I think we can handle things from here.

You heard the woman.

- Uh, then I will wish you both a good evening.

- Good evening.

- That's gonna take some getting used to.

- What, the butler?

- No, yes.

Arthur's great.

It's just this whole cocoon, it's a bit much.

- Well, we agreed it was the best option.

Everything we need is nearby

and you don't need to become my, my nursemaid.

- I'm not your nursemaid, I'm your wife.

- Huh, it's the first day.

Just give it a chance.

- You're right.

- As always.

Whoa, I am beat.

Why don't we just leave all that.

The maid will get it in the morning.

- No, you go on ahead.

I think I'll stay up and read awhile.

- All right, all right.

- I can never leave dirty dishes overnight either.

I'll dry. - Oh, Mrs. Kendrick,

let me take care of it for you.

- No, let me help, please.

- You are sure? - Yes.

- Oh, Mrs. Kendrick, you are very kind.

You're very kind.

It's so quiet here.

- I like that. - Yeah?

- You like the dinner?

- Oh, it was delicious.

- Oh, was it? - Yes.

- Well, that makes me so happy.

Breathe in

and breathe out

Easy inhale

and exhale.

Come in.

Welcome.

Grab a mat.

I'm Holly.

- Lilly.

- Lilly, everybody make a space for Lilly.

And core tightly engaged.

Maybe push up into a headstand.

Buy you lunch?

- Okay. - Okay.

Hey, don't beat yourself up.

That was a level three class.

But all those students were...

Old ladies?

Holly, over here!

- Hey, there, Greer.

We missed you in class today.

Had to skip, doctor's orders.

- This is Lilly.

Lilly just moved in.

This is Greer Emmons and this is Paula Marx.

- So, hmm?

What do you think?

- About?

- Her face, of course!

Uh.

Oh.

Our own Dr. Campbell.

- Her third lift in ten years.

It really is the best one yet.

Oh, thank you, thank you.

- It's very nice.

- Feel. - What?

Feel!

No scars.

None.

Some new process he's invented.

- Dr. Campbell is a plastic surgeon?

- He is an everything surgeon.

And you name it.

- Anyway, he says two weeks and I can be back at yoga.

- Mm. - And did he

prescribe your painkillers

with an olive or a twist?

- You know, Holly, you might wanna talk

to Dr. Campbell about that droop in your jaw line.

It makes you look so bitter.

Well, real beauty is on the inside.

Ah.

- That's why I'm considering vaginal rejuvenation.

- I didn't know.

- Yes. - Oh, that's fantastic.

Mm-hmm.

- This roasts low and slow for a couple hours

which is time enough for a game.

Where did you learn this game?

- My village.

You see, the old women they were superstitious

with the dice.

They called them bone-sticks and they believed

they had the power to predict the future.

They would even hide a domino in the home of a friend

or an enemy to bring that person good or ill fortune.

- Really? - Mm-hmm, yes.

It became hard to find a full set to play a game.

Two is for friendship.

A double two means new friends.

Close friends.

- Do you have someone special?

My sister and my mother.

- It must be hard to be so far apart.

- What I will do,

it gives them a chance at a better life.

To sacrifice for those we love is

a tremendous gift.

I mean, you yourself, Mrs. Kendrick,

you do not seem so happy living here.

But you choose to do it for Mr. Kendrick.

The one is for travel...

Oh, you two are playin' again.

- Ah, Mr. Kendrick!

Yes.

Mrs. Kendrick has once again beat me soundly.

- How was your appointment?

- Well, the good doctor has said

I am well enough to take you out to the dining room tonight.

- But we already started dinner.

- Will you excuse us?

Of course, sir.

- You said you would make an effort to socialize.

- Is it such a bad thing that I prefer

the company of my husband?

- This woman wanted to make

$100,000 donation, and in return,

she wanted to adopt a cat.

- Must've been some cat.

- Yeah, her demand was that she be allowed

to have all shelter cats tested to find a match

for her cat which was dying of kidney disease.

She was basically shopping for cat kidneys.

So the SPCA board, including Ivar, had to vote

on whether to let this woman use their cats for spare parts.

- Most of those cats end up euthanized anyway, right?

- How did you vote?

- Well, it's not like it was a dog.

- That's terrible.

- Stop motherin' me.

- Well, if you stopped acting like a child.

Well, I just had a couple of drinks.

- You had more than a couple of drinks.

Richard?

Richard?

Richard!

Arthur, please!

Arthur!

Arthur, please!

Richard suffered a severe myocardial infarction

which required an emergency bypass.

It's still early but all the indicators

are positive for a swift recovery.

- Can I see him?

He won't wake until tomorrow.

You should go home, get some sleep.

You'll need your strength for the recovery ahead.

- Thank you.

Any discomfort or itching

from the healing incisions?

Problems sleeping or loss of appetite?

Taking your medicine every day, having some mild exercise?

- Yes, I feel great!

Enough.

I guess my work here is done.

- So, that's it?

- Six weeks since the surgery.

Now he's just wasting my time.

Aw, you know you'll miss me.

- I'll see you out.

- Was there something else?

- Have you heard anything about Arthur?

Where he might have gone?

When he might be back?

- Look, you have your hands full with your husband.

He needs more activity.

You make it too easy for him to sit around all day.

- Okay.

You both should get out of this house.

- Thank you.

You heard the woman.

We need to get out of the house.

Richard, you look just great.

Doesn't he look great?

- Yes. - Honestly,

I haven't felt this good in ages.

Since well before the heart attack.

And Dr. Campbell said that the blockage

that he repaired might well have been

what caused my stroke last time.

You know, Dr. Campbell told me that there was a,

a moment when I was on the table that

tested everything that he knew about medicine.

He opened me up only to discover that my heart wasn't there.

It turns out, it was just exceptionally small.

Like this.

- That looks like the medication that Richard is on.

- It's the, um, geriatric supplement Dr. Campbell created.

It has antioxidants in it.

- Does it work?

- The proof is in the pudding.

Right? - Honey,

do you want a, uh, coffee?

Decaf, dessert?

Anything?

- A decaf, please.

- Oh, I'll have a decaf, too.

Thanks.

Um, any takers for the ladies room?

Come on.

There goes my basset hound.

- Hey, boy, you are really fuckin' it up.

This is completely unacceptable!

What were you thinking?

You know the rules!

You can't just.

Oh, stop that!

Would you stop!

What's the matter with you?

Oh, for God's sakes, get out of here.

Just get out of here.

I understand what you're saying,

but if, if it's more than a little cough

then you have some common sense, man.

- You weren't there, I'm telling you.

Patsy was abusive.

I thought you might like a fire.

- That was very thoughtful of you.

- Could I get you anything?

A nightcap, perhaps?

- No, no, uh, thank you.

We're, we're done for the night.

Very well, good night then.

- You're still not warming to the, the new guy.

- It's just weird.

I mean, we come back from the hospital

and then it's, here's your new butler.

Do you think we got Arthur fired?

- How could we have done that?

- Maybe because he didn't answer

when I called the night of your attack?

- No, you're, you're over thinkin' this thing.

- Maybe he just didn't like us.

- Hey, not like me, maybe.

But not like you?

That's impossible.

Oh.

- Let's go to bed.

- Okay.

- Right on time for your three month checkup, Mr. Kendrick.

- Mm-hmm.

- You've been well since the surgery?

- Oh, I can't complain.

- Right this way, Mr. Kendrick.

- Be right back. - Okay.

- And how are you doing, Mrs. Kendrick?

- Oh, I am so sorry, Mrs. Kendrick.

- No, it's fine, really. - I didn't, I didn't mean to...

- I, I'm fine.

It was tough for awhile, but these past few weeks

things have been much better.

It's just.

- Look, I understand.

Really, I.

- Where are you from, Mia?

You seem so familiar.

Um, nowhere special.

- You wouldn't by any chance, I mean,

I'm trying to find an Amaranth employee who left.

He was really special... - Mr. Kendrick,

how did it go?

- Well, it turns out that I have the heart

of a lovesick 15 year old.

- Hi!

We're done, would you - Oh,

- take her? - thank you.

- Lilly, what are you doing here?

I thought you said you didn't ride?

- I don't.

But I'm supposed to be meeting Richard,

and he's been riding all morning.

Richard's riding?

Is that safe?

- I don't know.

Wow.

What a difference a few months make.

Tell me about it.

I can't keep up with him.

- Oh, hey, I'm meeting a few of the girls for lunch.

You wanna join us?

- I'm sorry, I, I can't.

I have plans.

Okay.

- And it's not just the sex,

although that's a big part of it.

He's reckless in a way I haven't seen in years

and frankly I'm worried.

- Hmm, I see.

Well, it's possible these changes

in Richard's behavior could be

a side effect of his medications.

To achieve the, uh, the perfect dosage

can sometimes take some tweaking.

Uh, I'll take a look at his chart.

But this appointment is supposed to be about you, Lilly.

I've been, uh,

reviewing your blood panel and I have some thoughts.

- Is something wrong?

- No, no, no, no, you're fine.

But we try to do better than just fine.

- So you think this might be caused by Richard's medication?

Because I was wondering, those yellow pills?

- Ah, yes.

The Formula.

Well, I'm, uh, I'm happy to take credit

for their miraculous properties.

They're simply a supplement tailored

to the needs of the Amaranth population.

There's Veratrol, Metformin, that sort of thing.

I wonder, would you be interested

in seeing our research lab?

I don't generally bring residents down here.

It's rare that anyone's actually interested

in the, uh, tedious grunt work

behind our breakthroughs in geriatric medicine.

Yeah, most

of the breakthroughs, uh,

including our Amaranth formula, are in fact plant based.

We maintain our own, uh, compound pharmacy

for quality control.

And take a look at this.

Well, what pretty flowers.

- Belladonna.

The source of the pyridine in our own strain

of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD,

proving remarkably successful

at reversing mitochondrial decay.

Old age kills a hundred thousand people a day.

It's no different than, uh, small pox or polio.

Just another disease that needs another cure.

- I never thought of it that way.

But isn't belladonna poisonous?

- Oh, as is chemotherapy,

or any drug used in excess for that matter.

We could use synthetic means to procure the chemical,

but I believe the more natural the better.

Of course, uh, the alternative method used

in previous centuries involved boiling animal bones.

What's he doing?

- Bud grafting.

Surgically attaching the bud eye

of a fragile plant onto that of a sturdier stock.

- Your commitment to hiring refuges is admirable.

- Working with the devastated communities in the camps

is a unique opportunity to push my surgical boundaries.

Amaranth's population presents

the world's greatest medical challenge.

How to not just extend the human lifespan,

but the quality of that life.

Oh, and there you have yams and soy,

a natural source of estrogen,

which, uh, reminds me.

Why don't you, uh, take this over to the dispensary?

It's a prescription for a bioidentical hormone.

Many of the ladies here swear by it.

It's, uh, a little boost to your libido.

It might, uh, help you and Richard

meet somewhere in the middle.

- I was in a camp when I met Dr. Campbell.

That's how I got here.

- You must've been terrified.

- No, um, they have a saying where I come from.

They say.

- It means, sunken fish move sideways.

No, whatever's happened happened and you just keep moving.

What about you?

Where's your family?

- My mother passed away years ago

and I lost track of my father.

It's just me and Richard.

- So, you have no children?

- Richard's boys were grown when we met.

Our romance seemed like it would be enough.

- I have a daughter.

She's, she's the light of my world.

- Is she with her father?

- No, no, no, she's, she's with friends.

But someday soon I will send for her.

You've been seeing a lot of that Mia.

I like her, she's nice.

Well, there are plenty of nice people here.

I know.

Holly and the Rosenthals.

But you have to admit there's a lot

of conspicuous consumption, not to mention desperation.

Really?

Well, you have a chance to redeem yourself.

We've been invited

to a party tonight at the Clancys'.

- Who?

- Bill and Nan.

Bill.

- This is quite a party.

- Yes, yes, it is.

- Richard, Lilly, come over here.

We made it.

Lilly, I didn't know you ran

with the tennis crowd.

- I don't.

That is, Richard and I are just here for the party.

I don't play tennis.

Neither does most of the tennis crowd.

Unless you count the mixed doubles.

- So, where is Richard?

- Oh, he's, he's right over.

I'd keep a close eye on him if I were you.

- They say Nan Clancy put the whore in hormone therapy.

Oh.

What are you doing?

- What does it look like I'm doing?

- Lilly, I didn't know it was that kinda party.

- It's not about that.

It's this place, it's, it's you.

- You're right, look, I, I know this is no excuse

but these, these changes in me,

sometimes I hardly recognize myself.

- Where does that leave me?

Is this what the rest of my life looks like?

Maybe things would be different if we'd had.

- We'd had what?

If we what?

- It doesn't matter.

- Lilly, I'm, I'm beggin' you.

You're my world.

Please.

- You're joking, right?

A key party. - Mm.

What did you do?

- I got the hell out of there

and you two could've warned me.

- I had no idea.

Well, I've heard rumors.

Did you get some?

- Don't you think about it.

Where's Lilly, anyway?

- Oh, she's had a bit of a stomach problem.

Maybe it's a touch of the flu.

- Well, we miss her.

I, I just don't know.

Dr. Campbell knows what he's doing.

Besides, if you keep Richard happy

then he won't be so angry when he finds out

you've reconciled with your father.

- He was furious when I married Richard.

He calls him The Fascist.

I believe I mentioned thinking about my father lately

but I never said anything about reconciliation.

- Oh, well, you must.

Family's everything, Lilly.

You know, if I didn't have my daughter,

my life would've been meaningless.

- Well, I wouldn't know.

- Oh, no, no, I mean, I, I'm sorry.

I didn't mean that. - It's okay.

I know what you meant.

It's this place.

It's just awful, empty.

- You're talking as if it's too late.

Like your choices are behind you.

Lilly, you are still young.

You can have whatever life you want.

You just need to choose.

Can I help you?

Is this Sunshine Manor?

It is.

I'm looking for someone.

John Woodhouse?

Yes, John is here.

- Can, can I see him?

Sure, he's just around the corner in room 146.

- Okay, thank you.

Who's there?

Well, did she, did she say

she was going anywhere or did.

Hold on, I think she's here.

Where have you been?

I've been worried sick!

- I went to see my father.

Your father?

Are you okay?

- I'm fine.

I'm sorry I got upset.

Yeah.

- You guys have got to try the pu-pu platter.

Fabulous, just fabulous.

There you go.

- Thank you. - Oh, you're not eating

anything? - I'm feeling off.

- She's internalizing missing you know who.

It is so easy

for us to get attached to the staff.

I cried for one month when we lost our favorite masseuse.

- Masseur.

- What? - A man is called

a masseur, not a masseuse.

- Whatever.

He had hands like a god.

Oh.

- It happens.

We're on our third butler, do you know that?

- You're all so kind.

We really, really appreciate...

Oh! - Oh, oh, honey!

- I'm right here, honey.

It's gonna be okay.

It's gonna be wonderful.

- What happened?

- Your appendix.

Uh, the surgery went well.

I expect a swift recovery.

But there was, however, um, one unusual complication.

- Brace yourself, hon.

- Lilly, you're pregnant.

- You're joking.

Apparently he isn't.

- Have you been taking the hormones I prescribed?

- Yes.

- I know that this is quite a shock, Lilly,

but it isn't unprecedented.

Women older than yourself have conceived

under similar circumstances.

- Oh, believe me Doctor, this is wonderful news.

Isn't it, honey?

Well, this is an extremely high-risk pregnancy.

Lilly will need to be monitored closely,

and I would like to keep you here

for a couple more days to ensure

no complications result from the appendectomy.

- Of course. - Okay.

And it's important to immediately begin

a regimen of prenatal supplements.

- But those are... - Those are chock full

of precisely what you need.

Congratulations.

It's been two weeks since we've seen her at yoga.

- The poor thing needs time to recuperate.

- Mm.

Did I forget to mention?

I stopped by their place.

Just to check in.

That was so good of you.

Mm-hmm.

- So? - Hmm?

How is Lilly?

- Well, all I can say is having an appendectomy

agrees with her.

- Really?

- Oh, yes, she was positively glowing.

- Well, that doesn't surprise me.

Are those all schnauzers?

- What can I say?

Every dog we've had.

Ivar loves them.

- No, thank you.

Will there be anything else, Mr. Kendrick?

- No, that'll do it.

Thank you.

- I could ask them to give us a different butler?

- He's fine.

- Well, you've got something on your mind.

Come on, out with it.

You promise you won't be mad?

- I won't be mad.

Well, with this baby,

lately I've been thinking about my father.

I thought maybe he deserved

to know he has a grandchild coming.

- I understand the impulse,

but we both know how he feels about me.

So I say let's just let sleeping dogs lie.

Hmm?

- You look, you look like your mother.

How are they treating you here?

How are you feeling?

You know there are other places?

Nicer ones.

I could have you moved to The Amaranth,

where Richard and I are staying.

- Why would I do that?

Throwin' money away.

- I have something to tell you.

- Oh, that old Richard wouldn't agree with me.

People like him wasting the world's resources.

Pointless vanity.

It's disgusting. - Hi, there.

Shirley. - So.

- Me and John are friends.

Ain't that right, John?

I heard you say that you've livin'

over there at The Amaranth.

Yes, my husband and I

moved there a few months ago.

Oh!

Fancy-schmancy.

I knew a woman who lived there.

I, I wonder if she's still around.

Name was Patsy.

Patsy Howard.

- Oh, I know Patsy.

Oh.

You tell her hi from me.

- From Shirley. - Well, from her daughter.

- Oh, she's your daughter?

No, silly.

I'm her daughter.

That's impossible.

Oh.

Sure it is.

Sure it is.

- Thank you.

- Okay, let's see what, uh, twelve weeks

looks like here on the monitor.

Okay.

I'm surprised Richard isn't here for this.

- I didn't tell him.

If it's not good news, I didn't wanna see

the look on his face.

Well, I think he will be sorry

he missed it.

- You mean? - I mean it looks like

you have successfully completed

your first trimester, Lilly.

So, should we tell people?

- Yes, but I would keep it close to the vest.

Um, this pregnancy will come as a shock to most people,

and you don't wanna open yourselves up

to unnecessary scrutiny.

Have you been taking the supplements?

- Yes, but a bottle seems to be missing.

- Missing?

- I, I'm sure I misplaced it somewhere in the house.

- You misplaced it somewhere in the house.

Well, just stop at the, uh,

front desk on your way out and let Dora know.

- Have you heard anything from Mia?

I'll let you know if I hear from her.

- Hmm.

I just left the doctor's office

and everything's looking good.

- Oh, honey, that's wonderful.

- What's wrong?

You're scaring me.

- Come sit down.

I have some terrible news.

Your father's nursing home called when you were out.

He passed away this morning.

This morning?

- They said he went peacefully in his sleep.

I am sorry I kept the two of you apart so long.

I never even told him.

There's a little paperwork to go over.

And we've left his personal effects in his room

in case there's anything you might want

before we call the donation center.

- What about his body?

I thought you knew.

John stipulated that his body be donated to science.

The university picked him up about an hour ago.

I'm so sorry.

You doin' okay?

- I don't know.

You have a resident here named Shirley.

I, uh, I thought I'd check up on her.

She was friends with my father.

Did she tell you that?

As I recall, your father thought she was a pain.

But either way,

she's not here.

- Where is she? - The hospital.

She got a hold of someone else's medication.

Again.

Hmm, come to think of it,

she claimed she got it from your dad.

I knew John's medications

and he wasn't taking any immunosuppressants.

- Any what?

- They're for people with MS or organ transplants.

They suppress the immune system.

Well, Sunshine Manner would never

take on immuno-compromised seniors.

The slightest infection, mm.

Lord knows where Shirley found 'em.

Craziest thing.

Her name is Patsy, Patsy Howard.

No, silly, I'm her daughter.

How old do you think that people here are?

- I don't know.

About my age I suppose.

Where is this coming from?

- I don't know.

I guess I've been thinking about it

since we left Dad's home.

I mean the people there they seemed so old.

But if you think about it,

they're the same age as our neighbors

who are out playing golf every day.

- Well, there's the obvious difference

in their level of care.

- How old would you say someone like Patsy Howard is?

- Oof, I don't know, uh, she's had a lotta work.

- I saw her birth date on her file.

- How did you... - It doesn't matter how.

The fact is that I saw it and it makes no sense.

- I'm sorry that your, your dad

ended up in that miserable place.

But the fact is a lotta people

end their days in a place like that.

And we are blessed.

It's just a file.

That you, my love, had no business snooping in.

- I am putting you on total bed rest

- That's... - It's great.

Whatever we need to do.

- A minor placental abruption isn't unexpected

given your age, but we still need to take it seriously.

Have you been under any unusual strain?

- Uh, uh... - She just lost her father.

- My condolences.

But you need to take care of yourself now.

Okay?

- Honestly, I'm fine.

Don't you think maybe all of this is overkill?

- No, that is to make sure you get all the nutrients,

all the medications you need to avoid early labor.

Okay, you win.

How about I stay home?

I'll listen to the game in the office

so that I can shout at the refs all I want

without bothering you.

And then I'll, uh, I'll come hang out

with you between periods.

Gets help from Kopitar, now Williams.

Down to the blue line, shot from there by McVeigh

gets blocked in front by the Predators.

A long lead pass comes all the way down

towards the Redden.

He sweeps it along the right wing boards.

It's taken by the Kings.

Back into the crease in front.

It comes over to the left side now.

And they still can't clear it out.

He got it there

and then it comes bouncing out.

- Ooh.

Mm.

- Oh, did you do something different with your hair, Alice?

It is beautiful.

They're Hermes.

- Well, if you don't wanna say anything, I will.

- Let's not just talk about...

Is there a problem?

- Yeah, ah, it, it is come to my attention

by a number of the residents that this baby violates

the CC and R's of The Amaranth community.

- What?

- The bylaws state very clearly that 55

is the minimum age for residents,

so while we all applaud this impending baby,

it is a, you know, complication.

- A complication?

Yeah, I just, you know,

highly irregular.

- These are issues that need to be discussed.

I mean, what's to prevent other couples

from having children?

- Age.

- What about adoption?

- You let one in, and pretty soon

you're overrun with orphans

from Zimbabwe for Christ sake. - Okay, all right,

let's just... - We're here to celebrate

a miracle, and, and you're bickering

like a pack of litigators. - The noise.

- And the germs.

- If you cannot keep your big yap shut,

and just be happy for them, I suggest you leave.

- Yeah.

- Okay, so how does it feel?

Really?

- I, I never believed,

I mean I never even dreamed

that this could happen to me.

- So, no regrets despite the, the physical discomfort

and all the complications it's gonna add to your life?

'Cause Ivar and I have been talking about it.

- Talking about what?

- I'm not that much older than you, Lilly,

and, and Ivar is younger than Richard.

- I'm sorry.

I just, I mean you caught me by surprise.

I, I had no idea that you were...

So, what are you lookin' at?

Adoption, surrogacy?

- Oh my God, you're serious.

Yesterday, Holly implied that there

was something unusual about the conception of our baby.

- Well, it, it was a bit of a shock.

Even to us.

But I can see her being maybe a little jealous.

- I suppose.

- Well, she'll get over it.

What's that?

- I'm flyin' down to Houston

to meet with the board of directors.

I'll be back tonight.

Late, so don't wait up. - What are you talking about?

- I'm takin' my company back.

Those boys of mine are runnin' it into the ground.

- W, When were you planning on telling me?

- Do you have any idea how much this place costs?

Somebody's gotta protect our assets.

- We'll be moving out of this place soon enough.

- Oh, you mean the the women at the shower?

They cannot make us leave.

- Of course we're gonna leave after the baby's born.

We can't raise a child here.

- Why not?

A child needs a neighborhood with schools

and families and friends.

- Honey, we have plenty of time.

We will discuss this when I get back.

Hmm?

- Hello?

Hello, Lilly?

- Oh, Andrew.

Your father's not home.

I don't expect him until late.

I know.

- Look, I don't wanna get in the middle of whatever it is...

You had nothing to do

with Dad screwing me out of the company and my inheritance.

- Your what?

I, I, I don't know what you're talking about.

Yeah, and changing his will

so that your little science project

can be his new heir, huh?

Excellent job keeping that a secret.

- Well, we wanted to be sure before we told anyone.

Well, Dad was pretty sure of it

last March when he changed his will.

- But why?

I wasn't pregnant until April.

Come on, don't pretend

you weren't planning this from the beginning.

- To sacrifice for those we love

is a tremendous gift.

- Knocked up by Dad. - This is wonderful news.

Isn't it, honey?

You must've been confident.

You and Dad really are a match made in heaven.

- You just need to choose.

- Mrs. Kendrick, remember what Dr. Campbell said.

- Please don't tell Mr. Kendrick.

He'd be so upset with me.

Maybe a bath would help me relax.

But not too hot.

Of course.

Lilly!

What are you doing?

Open the door!

Open the door!

Okay, let them in.

- Lilly!

Okay.

- I need to know.

- All right.

We'll go in.

- Richard. - Doctor.

Lilly.

- What is this place?

- You see Lilly, the problem with traditional medicine

is you can place a young organ in an old body,

but without support from the other systems well,

it's a stopgap measure at best.

But if you add transplantation from endocrine systems

and heterochronic parabiosis,

if you get down to a cellular level,

you can extend life, healthy life, indefinitely.

- Does everybody know about this?

Everybody except me?

- No, although every member,

when faced with saving their own life

or the life of their partner.

Richard's heart surgery.

- Last year Arthur's mother and sister

were among a group of women

who were kidnapped from his village.

Arthur knew about our work here and he came to me.

We negotiated a price.

Your husband paid that price.

The yellow pills.

- An immunosuppressant.

We still have to prevent organ rejection

the old-fashioned way, but we are making progress.

I found that transplants from a living host

reduce the need for maintenance medication enormously.

- You're stealing organs.

Purchasing.

This man willingly volunteered

and he was richly compensated.

- Mia.

- Come with me.

The child you carry is your own, Lilly.

With that hormone boost I was able to harvest a single egg

and fertilize it with Richard's sperm,

but for an embryo to thrive in a womb of such advanced age,

um, well you should know,

in case it does ever give you trouble,

you still have your appendix.

This is monstrous.

- I'll give you two a moment.

- I wanted to make you happy.

I wanted to give you the same

second chance I'd been given.

It was a simple surgery.

But there were complications.

- How could you?

- Mia knew the risks.

She chose this.

No.

No, no.

No, no, no.

No.

No.

Who's ready for an adventure?

This is where Daddy lives.

- This must be little Mia.

Beautiful.

We'll be right back.

Follow me.

- Even with the bone marrow transplant,

the best her doctors could offer was a year.

Of course there's no way of knowing

whether this unfortunate outcome is a result of our process.

- Can you help?

Doctor?

- I believe so.

But this kind of procedure would be

something new and unorthodox.

And Mia would need to live here,

at least for the foreseeable future.

Given Lilly's objections

to our methodologies in the past, well.

- That won't be a problem.