Sunburst (1975) - full transcript

A pair of college students go on a trip up to the mountains to look for a friend who dropped out of school to find personal fulfillment apart from the norms of American society. Along the way, the couple is warned of dangerous terrain and unfriendly local residents who are not worth the trouble of finding a lost friend. The film stars Robert Englund in the role of the lost friend before he become a household name as the terrifying boogeyman Freddy Krueger.

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---
(folk music)

(laughing)

- It's Michael.

He's living in the mountains
and built his own cabin.

He says he's never been
happier with himself

when we're together.

Hi, Marshall.

- Come on, Jenny.

How's it going Robert? Still
hanging out with the dorm rats?

(laughing)

- And as we all know, negative feelings



naturally breed negative feelings, right.

And conversely, positivity,
honest positivity.

Well, how nice of you to join us.

- That's okay. I'm glad we could make it.

- So, in the discussion
of the dynamics of change,

we're told by our philosophers
and our theologians

that we of the 20th
century are concluding the

Piscean Age and approaching
the Aquarian Age.

Our world is indeed a new world,
and it's an exciting world.

Yet, at the same time,
we have to understand

that those things that we've been taught,

our theories, our feelings
of the nature of things,

vast becoming obsolete.

Traditions are falling by the wayside.



Age old beliefs are just being thrown away

and disappearing, as is the family unit.

What was practical yesterday,
doesn't work today.

It's passe.

So, now, let's throw this
into an open forum discussion.

Shall we?

- Well, what do we have
to hold on to anymore?

I mean, it just seems
to me like we've lost

touch with our roots.

- Right on.

- Well, where do you
suppose your roots are?

- In her pants.

(laughing)

- Well, I think that our roots in Earth.

- Alright.

- I think our roots are in heaven.

- [Male Student] Oh crap,
what's that suppose to mean?

- God.

- I have a friend.

Some of you may remember
Michael Sutherland.

Well, he dropped out his freshman year,

and he went to the wilderness.

And I just got a letter from him--

- Come on Jenny, now, wait a minute.

Now, you're talking about a
guy that was a doper, a freak.

Now, he dropped out
because he couldn't cope.

- That's not true.

- He couldn't cope with the
likes of someone like you.

Or the likes of your raw
raw frat, or the likes

of a lot of civilized
society as we know it.

I mean, Michael's the
type of guy that went up

to the wilderness--

- That's nothing new is it.

I mean, people have been
dropping out for a long time

saying "I have the answer."

- Well, what's your answer, Marshall?

("Pretty Things" by Roberta Van Dere)

- What's the matter?

You don't like what I said about Michael?

- Lately, I don't like a
lot of what you're saying.

- Ah.

I meant, what I said you know.

You know, Michael can't face life.

That's why he ran away into the woods.

- Well, he says he's looking for meaning.

- Bullshit.

You know, times have changed.

People aren't into heavy trips anymore.

The meaning's right here,
just with all these kids.

You gotta stick something out
if you want to make it work.

- Well, I don't necessarily buy that.

I've stuck it out. And what?

- I don't believe you.

Do you know how many girls
would love to be in your shoes?

I mean, head cheerleader,
homecoming queen,

and you can't find a meaning.

- There's a lot more to life than that.

I mean, after all the fun
and games are finished,

what do I have?

- Me.

(funk music)

- Come baby.

Wanna play the slot machine?

- Oh, I never gamble, unless I can win.

- Oh, well, that's fixed.

But I'm flexible.

Besides, she can't hold you
with arm like I can with two.

- Oh, you wanna dance honey?

- Oh, down and dirty (laughs).

(funk music)

- Hi, Robert.

- No.

- Huh, it's a party.

- Marshall.

- Whoa (laughs).

- How you doing, Marshall?

- Uh hmm.

- Marshall, stop it.

- Come on.

(dance blues music)

- There we go.

Isn't she great?

Come on. Whoa.

Let's go, come on.

Let's go.
(cheering)

(laughing)

Hey, 39 Ds.

Let's go Brent, off, come on, get it off.

(cheering)

Yeah.

(laughing)

Alright, Mr. Bad, take it off.

You heard me, take it off.

Pledge, you're just not Greek
material, you're through.

(water splashing)

(R & B music)

There's something wrong with Jenny and me.

You're her friend. What did she say?

- Well, sometimes I think
you are a bit hard on her.

- It's that Robert. He's so damn smug.

- Now, they have been best
friends all of their lives.

- No, he wants more than friendship.

He knows that, and I know it.

Damn.

You know I love Jenny.

- I know that Marshall.

It's just that, well sometimes you have

a funny way of showing it.

- You know, I really would
love to see Michael again.

- Me too.

- [Jenny] And he's sleeping
under the stars right now.

- High on a mountain top.

- Well, actually, according to his letter,

he's really not that far away.

- You too through talking,

or do I need to make a reservation?

- Quit.

- What's with you two?

- Hey, come on Marshall, let's dance.

- Hey, you're still talking
about that other idiot, Michael.

- He's not an idiot.

- You know, you're really
beginning to piss me off.

You're so damn insensitive.

You can really be a bitch
sometimes, you know what?

- Come on, Marhsall.

- Talk about insensitivity.

Marshall, you're so damn
narrow, all you can do

is relate things back to yourself.

- Okay, that does it.

Both of you, get the hell out of my house.

Hey, why don't you go up to the mountain,

and play with your candy ass friend?

- Oh, come all, okay,
he really doesn't mean.

- No, it's not such a bad idea after all.

- I think it's a great idea.

- Okay (laughs).

Alright, everybody come on, let's go.

Let's get it going.

- [Man] I'll get on the backpacks.

- Great, terrific.

(car driving by)

(engine revving)

- Oh, actually, I'm tired.

- Me too.

(sighing)

Maybe we should wait until morning.

- Nope, keep on driving.

(car honking)

(people talking loudly)

- Come on, get up there.

(yelling)
(laughing)

- Tom.

- Right on it.

(engine revving)

(laughing)

So, fun.

- Hey what are you trying to do?

- Marshall.

(engine revving)

(screaming)

- What are you trying to do man?

God, you're trying to kill us?

- Hey, hold it, Robert.

- [Robert] Just trying to have some fun.

- Well, great fun.

- Jenny, the joke's over, come on.

- No.

- Jenny, I'm sorry.

If I scared you, I'm really sorry.

What do you mean no? Come on.

- I'll take care of her.

- You'll what?

Butt out huh.

I mean just get in your car, and please.

Get the hell out of here.

Easy Marshall.

You better go.

- I'll wait.

- Come on.

- Not without Jenny.

- You know, all you want to do is get up

and get in her pants.

- Marshall.

It's over.

("I'm Ready" by Roberta Van Dere)

- Robert, are you sure
we didn't pass the turn?

- Very sure.

I knew we should have turned up here.

- You're right Robert, I
should have said something.

(engine revving)

(dog barking)

- And at 20, you'd stand in line for hours

to take a ride on that first
atomic powered rocket ship,

it should be.

You wouldn't stand in line to
take a ride on a magic carpet

through Shangri-La on a pass.

In fact, the only thing
you stand in line for

is a place to sit down.

At at 21, a girl smiled
at you and gave you that

annoying look, you'd
wondered on to the next

weighing machine mirror, to
see why you were so handsome.

At 50, you looked to see who's behind you,

or perhaps unbuttoned.

You've been such a splendid audience,

I think I'll do a very
smooth song for you.

(piano music)

♫ We are poor little lambs
who have lost our way

♫ Mar wa wa

Come in, come in, come in.

I'm doing a little bit of my idol act.

Come in and be the audience, please.

♫ Mar wa

♫ Gentlemen songsters half on a string

♫ Doomed from here to eternity

♫ God have a mercy on such as me

♫ Bar va

(clapping)

Did I do it right?

- I've heard that song before.

- Yes, it's become a sort of classic.

It's one of thousands that I introduced

over the airwaves in the
days of big time radio.

See, radio brought me
the fame and fortune.

I was one of the first to
show the great power grader,

to make the networks
really great and famous,

and possible.

But today, they've forgotten.

You go through all the
television studios out there,

particularly in Burbank.

The hallways are pictures
of the all the young

television stars, but no
pictures of Amos and Andy,

of those who made radio truly great.

A bit of disillusioning,
but after 20 years

of radio, and 20 years of show business,

I decided to come up here
and get away from it all.

Now, what I can do for you?

- Well, we were looking for a friend.

- A friend?

Come out here, I have something for you.

Come this way.

I have a real treat for you.

A really delicious treat.

How far have you traveled?

- Oh, about 150 miles.

- A 150 miles.

In that thing?

Amazing incredulous.

But you must try this candy.

They're called licorice
nips, and they're made in

Culver City, California.

The most delicious hard licorice
candy you've ever tasted.

Now, let them melt in your mouth.

Just don't crush them.

Just let them melt gently in your mouth.

What are you doing here?

Where are you going?

- Hmm.

Was this mailed from here.

- Yes, that's my postmarked.

Who mailed it?

- Michael Sutherland.

He's about 21, blonde.

Do you remember him?

- Yes, I know Sutherland.

I haven't seen him in some time.

I believe he lives at Navarro Ridge right?

- Yes. Do you know how we can find him?

- No, I haven't been to his place,

and I have no desire to.

It's much too dangerous
and too far to travel.

Especially to someone who's
not a native of these parts.

A lot of strange things have
happened in this wilderness.

- Well, we'll only be up
there for a couple of days.

I think we'll make it.

- Make it. Impetuous youth.

You always can make it.

Just a moment.

May I suggest you take this wife?

- About Michael.

- As I've said, I've never been there.

More candy?

- Oh, no thank you.

Might you point us in the
direction of Navarro Ridge.

- I told you, it's very, very hazardous.

Now, I'm going to insist
you take this knife with you

for your protection.

A lot of young persons
have left these parts

and have never been seen again.

This is real bargain, 14.95,

a descent price of 14.95.

- Well, I think Michael
might have the necessities

for our trip.

Besides, I don't hunt.

- Yes, well suppose, you're
the one who's being hunted.

- Yes sir.

How do we get to that ridge?

- You're impossible.

You can't do that trail alone.

You go across the road, get on the trail.

At the end of the trail,
the bottom of Navarro Ridge.

- I liked your song.

- Thank you.

Now, you take good care of her.

You take good care of her.

- Don't say that I didn't warn you.

- Maybe we should have bought the knife.

- The thought of that old man.

He'd try to sell ice to an Eskimo.

- Oh, blackberries.

- Uh, you know, Michael's so
right about all this out here.

- And the daisies are so beautiful.

I think I'm gonna pick a couple.

- Hey, Jenny, Jenny,
now that's poison oak.

Here, have another berry.

- Oh.

(laughing)

(folk music)

How long do you think it'll
take before we get there?

- Oh, I don't know. I don't
even know where there is.

Not really (laughing).

Oh, let's take these things off.

(laughing)

- Oh.

My feet are killing me.

- [Robert] Relief.

- Would you like something?

- Scotch and water.

- How about a warm beer instead?

- Perfect.
(Beer splashing)

(laughing)

How you feeling?

- Great.

- Oh, holy smokes.

- [Jenny] Oh.

- Well, it looks like
we have to go back now.

- Good.

- No, come on.

- You're bananas if you think
I'm going up that cliff.

- Well, we have to get
up there before dark.

I'll see you.

- No Robert.

(rock music)

("Animals Are Clumsy
Too" by Roberta Van Dere)

- We'll camp here.

- Ugh.

- Here, let's make a fire.

What a day.

Exhausted.

- Oh, the stars Robert.

They're so beautiful.

- Hmm.

I'm hungry.

And I can't move.

(laughing)

- Well, if you really want,
I'll fix you something.

- Oh, no, no no. I'm almost
too tired to eat anyhow.

(crickets chirping)

(bear growling)

- Robert, wake up.

Wake up.

- Oh my god, a bear.

- Robert, do something.

He's eating all our food.

- Our you kidding me?
Now, this is serious.

- Don't speak.

Freeze, just freeze.

(bear breathing loudly)

- What if he doesn't like
what he finds in our bags.

- Shut up.

Oh, what a mess.

- Wasn't he cute?

- He's a pig.

- He was beautiful.

(birds chirping)

- Hey, Jenny.

Jenny!

Ha.

Breakfast, mademoiselle.

- (Speaks in foreign language).

Hmm.

Hmm.

(laughing)

- You look like you're Al Jolson.

(laughing)

You know what?

- [Jenny] Hmm?

- You're really asking for it lady.

(screaming)

("Take the Time" by Roberta Van Dere)

Michael's got to be near.

You're okay.

- Ah ha.

Think you can take care of
yourself for a few minutes?

(birds chirping)

- Jenny, Jenny.

Jenny.

Michael, Michael.

(laughing)

- Well.

- This place is just outstanding.

Pretty nice huh, Jenny.

- Robert, look at this.

- Ah.

The garden of plenty.

No, I'm stuffed.

(laughing)

I cooked, you clean.

I'm going down to the pond we passed by.

- Liberation.

(symphonic music)

- Come on in, the water's fine.

(water wooshing)

- Maybe later.

- Oh god, what have you got to hide?

(water splashing)

(laughing)

(water splashing)

(laughing)

(water splashing)

(screaming)

Robert.

(symphonic music)

(water splashing)

Come on.

(laughing)

- Will you shut up?

Let's go.

- [Jenny] Look out.

(laughing)

- Yeah, that guy looks like a faggot.

- Why don't you ask him
if he wants to kiss you?

- Shut up.

- He's getting closer, I bet
he grabs her big old tit.

- Of course that's what he's gonna do.

He's gonna get some BT.

What do you think he's in the water for?

- Ah, I'd like to dive for her sponge.

- You know something.

That is all you think about,
your one eyed trouser trout.

Now, just shut up.

- I gotta tell her I'm here.

- Danker.

- Hey, sister, let me
watch you, woo woo woo hoo.

- You want something?

- Shut up, you stupid shit.

Sorry.

He don't always got
control of his facility.

He's dumb. No, no, I mean,
he's sweet, he's really sweet.

He just means to be friendly,
ain't that right Binky.

- Yeah.

- Do you want something?

- Now, don't get hostile Curly.

Do not get hostile.

Now, all I want to know is what you two

are doing up here all by yourselves.

- We came up here to see a friend.

- A friend. That's sweet.

- Do you know Michael Sutherland?

- Well, I know everybody.

But none of them by their
names, only by their faces.

I'm one of those people who
never forgets a face, you know.

But if you mean him, yeah, we've seen him.

- I want you to go over
there, and be cool.

Have you seen him lately?

- No.

How long you staying momma?

- Her name is Jenny.

- How long you staying momma?

Oh, yeah, sorry,

that I didn't introduce myself.

Danker, you should be ashamed, you dingus.

Introduce yourself.

- Oh.

Hi, I'm Danker Zipper.

And this here's Darvon.

- Darvon?

Levon.

L-E-V-O with a slash over the O, N.

Levon, that's french man.

- For lizard.

- Danker.

(snorting)

Anyways it's always nice to meet

sweet mommas and their boys.

Say, you got guns?

- No, why?

- Hey, why is she getting out?

- I wanted to swim with here.

- I guess maybe she's tired.

- Well, maybe you better
tell her to get some rest.

(chuckling)

Oh, now, now, peace and love brother.

Peace and love, and we don't
mean no harm, you know.

See, we're looking for poachers.

And if there's one thing
I don't like on my land,

it's poachers.

They're filthy scum sucking
pigs, they're filth, you know.

But you know something,
I know you're okay curly.

I know it.

Bye bye.

- So long.

- Oh.

- Hey, want me to show you how to do this?

(laughing)

- Come on Dinky.

- Those were some of the weirdest guys

I think I've ever come across.

- They sure were.

- I wish we could lock that door.

Maybe it's our imagination,
but if those guys

wanted to do something, they
would have done it by now.

- We need some more firewood.

Well, this fire should be going all night.

- Wanna come out with me?

Well, you can go out by
yourself if you want to.

- Oh no way.

Come on.

(crickets chirping)

(harmonica playing)
(woman singing)

(harmonica playing)
(humming)

That's pretty good for just picking it up.

- It was a bit sloppy.

- No.

- Music be the food of love.

Your food's right behind it.

- Thanks a lot.

- It was a good meal.

(harmonica playing)

- Robert.

- Hmm?

- Do you think Michael's coming back soon?

- Well, if he's not here by the morning,

I guess we'll have to go on back.

- You know, I really don't
care if Michael comes back.

I'm just glad I'm up here with you.

Well, what are you staring at?

- If you could see anything,
what would you want to see?

- Tomorrow's sunshine.

(laughing)

(fire crackling)
(crickets chirping)

(door creaking)

(screaming)

(smacking)

(screaming)

- No.

- No, please.

- With a face like mine,
Momma, I can do what I like.

- No.

- Even when I've been
innocent, people always

thought oh Levon was guilty.

It's faces like mine people want to put

in the newspapers, you
know, right on the cover.

Oh, you've been playing up to me momma.

- No.

- Yes.

- No.

- Yes.

You've been playing up
to me just to imagine

what I was build like.

- No.

- Now, we was fit to go.

Can't stop me now.

You can't turn back that
old clock now, momma.

- Hurry up god dammit,
I'm getting all turned on.

Do it.

- Shut up.

- [Danker] Do it.

- You know something?

I used to hate myself.
That's right, I hated myself.

But now, now i love myself.

I love myself.

Don't you love me, momma?

(screaming)

- No.

- Don't you love me?

Yes, you love me.
(screaming)

You love me.

- No, no.

(screaming)

- Wake up, come on wake up.

Wake up bitch, I mean it.

Please, please.

Oh, god. Fight me bitch, come on fight me.

Hit me, come on hit me.

Hit me, hit me.

Wake up dammit.

I'll wake you, I'll wake you up.

- I know what to do.

God damn, I'll wake up.

- Danker.

- I know what to do.

- Danker. What are you doing?

She was mine.

(screaming)

Hurry up.

- I ain't done yet.
(slapping)

(man mumbling)

- God dammit.

Hurry up Danker.

(slapping)

Danker, stop hitting her,
you're gonna kill her.

- Since when do you care
so much about killing?

- Since now.

- Shit.

You know, you're a son of a bitch, Levon.

Shit.

- That's right.

(crickets chirping)

- Jenny.

- Oh, my god (gasping).

- Jenny, it's all over.

Jenny, Jenny.

You're safe now, Jenny.

(thunder rumbling)

Please forgive me.

(crying)

- Please.

(thunder rumbling)

- I'll be outside if you need me.

("Morning" by Roberta Van Dere)

- Hey, Michael.

- What the hell are you doing here?

- Your letter?

- What letter?

- To Jenny.

- Is she here too?

- Yeah, she is.

- Wow, what a surprise.

- Michael, don't go in there.

- Why? I want to see here.

- Jenny was raped last night.

- Oh my god.

Is she hurt.

Bad?

Are you okay?

Don't worry, easy. Come on.

How long have you been here?

- Oh, a couple of days.

- I mean, how long has she been alone?

- Just a few hours.

- Are you sure you're okay?

Alright, I'm gonna go see how she is.

Don't worry.

- Tell her I love her.

(door creaking)

- Hi, Jenny.

It's good to see you.

I just saw Robert.

You guys are really something.

Coming up all the way
up here just to see me.

Well.

Hey, how would you like some tea huh?

Yeah, that's good.

Some nice, piping hot bourbon tea.

Let's see, would you like,

yerba buena, rose hips?

No, um. Comfrey?

Hey anything you want, I've
been gathering it all afternoon.

Amazing mother nature.

I must have walked some 40
miles today to get that comfrey.

I got poison oak all over my legs.

Itches like crazy.

I'll tell you it's enough
to drive you crazy.

Hey, I know the best tea for you.

Penny Royal, huh. Yeah, that's the one.

Wakes you up and gets you going.

How about it Jenny?

Damn, nothing worse than
an itch you can't scratch.

The more you scratch it the worse it gets.

If you try to forget about it, the itch

just makes you climb the wall.

You know what I mean?

Alright, I just gotta
think about something else.

You know, that's true
with just about anything.

You have to let go of the itching

and forget about the scratching.

You have to think about the good things.

And drive that devil out of your house.

He's gone now Jenny.

What's done can't be undone, but huh,

hell, all it really comes
down to is carrying on.

That's all that really matters.

We've got to carry on.

(crying)

That's it, that's it.

Drive that devil out.

- Oh god.

I just can't tell you how
ugly and empty I feel so.

- Let it go, let it go.

(Jenny crying)

- I'm sorry.

I should hold it together.

I don't don't understand,
I just don't understand.

- Jenny, who understands.

Maybe it's fate.

Listen, maybe you'll
find some truth in it.

I know that must sound like bullshit,

but I wouldn't know how
else to do deal with it.

How else to justify it.

Do you know what I mean?

(gasping)

Come on, let's see if you can sleep.

Sleep.

Maybe later, we'll go
down to the lake, alright.

Come on, easy.

Easy.

- Oh Michael.

- Hey, Jenny.

- Hmm.

- You look wasted.

She's asleep.

She's stronger than I thought.

She's doing the right thing.

She's putting it together
for herself without words.

She's just into herself.

- Thank you Michael.

- How many?

- Two of them.

- Jesus.

- Hear that?

- I don't hear anything.

- Listen, I'm gonna go take a walk.

You stay with Jenny here okay.

- Sure.

(screaming)

Shh, shh.

I'm sorry.

Want your tea now?

Get some rest.

- [Man] I wanna go up
there and talk to her.

- [Man] You be nice to her.

- She doesn't care.

There's nothing wrong with her.

All I want to do is go up
there and see her, talk to her.

- Danker.

- Do you care anything about her?

I wanna go up there and talk to her.

And there's nothing you can do about it.

- Danker, dammit.

- I'm going up there.

What do you care about it? It
doesn't many any difference.

I don't care if they hear me.

I'm going up there to hump that broad.

And you ain't stopping me
like you did last night.

- Now, you listen to me Danker.

Now, listen to what I suggest.

I suggest that you go right
over there on those bushes

and wizzle your lizard.

And don't cross me Danker. I mean it.

- And what are you gonna do about it?

Gonna kick my ass?

- You know, I might.

You're gonna cross me aren't you.

You're gonna cross me.

After all I've done for you, teaching you

how to stay alive, how
to survive out here.

- Ah, crap. You know what, you're jealous.

You couldn't get it up
last night and I could.

You still that sheep's disease (laughs).

- Now, you just wait one minute.

You just wait one minute.

Listen for a second.

Listen.

What if you killed that bitch last night?

That's right Dank.

You have got to think.
You've got to think.

And even if you didn't, they're
gonna be waiting for us.

Hell, we saw that other boy
come in here this morning.

- Oh hell, how many
kills we made together?

Huh?

- You're right Dank, you're right.

And I'm sorry.

I am sorry.

- Okay, then, let's go on up there.

- So sorry.

- Oh, jeez.

That I didn't do that
sooner. You know something?

You wanna know something?
You make me puke.

You dumb ass, you make me puke.

- [Danker] I'm gonna
kill you son of a bitch.

Ah.

Get him curly.

Cut him.

- Come on boy.

- Can you make it?

Are you sure?

It's Robert.

- Cut him Curly.

Get him Levon.

- Get him Dank, come on get him.

- Get him.

- Why don't you just cut him now?

Cut him, cut him.

(men grunting)

- I'll get you.

Ah shit, you son of a
bitch. I'll show you.

Get him.

Oh.

Ah.
(kicking)

Oh.

(grunting)
(water splashing)

- Oh.

(grunting)

- [Michael] Robert.

- Robert!

Robert.

- They've gone.

They won't be back.

(gasping)

- What a waste.

I'm such a fool.

It wasn't even worth it.

(laughing)

♫ I used to complain about the pain

♫ Oh seeing things come 'round again

♫ And playing the same old funny games

♫ And asked myself where do I begin

♫ Now after all

♫ It's plain to see

♫ The last one to ask for a change was me

♫ 'Cause I was the one
who was making the rules

♫ And getting caught in your own game

♫ Is a game for fools

♫ You're a fool to be a puppet
even on your own strings

♫ Don't you know you're cheating yourself

♫ Tying yourself in knots

♫ Cut the strings and you
cut the ties that find you

♫ And you will find you will find yourself

(piano solo)

- Your pain is the breaking of the shell

that encloses your understanding.

Even as the stone of the fruit must break,

that it's heart may stand in the sun.

So, must you know pain.

And in the sweetness of friendship,

let there be laughter
and sharing of pleasures.

For in the dew of little things,

the heart finds it
morning and is refreshed.

♫ What do I need to start again

♫ Now that the story is over and done

♫ Just life as it is

♫ And the hand of a friend

♫ All I need is you and the sun

♫ You're a fool to be a puppet
even on your own strings

♫ Don't you know you're cheating yourself

♫ Tying yourself in knots

♫ Cut the strings and you
cut the ties that find you

♫ And you will find you will find yourself