A Fine Day (2001) - full transcript

A day in the life of the 21 years old Deniz, who aims to become an actress and makes her living by dubbing movies. After she has split with her old boyfriend she gets to know Diego and spends the evening with him.

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A FINE DAY

Deniz, are you there?
Pick up.

What was up this morning?
You needn't have Ieft so soon.

If you want, we can see each
other later. Give me a caII.

You're pIaying it safe, baby.

If it doesn't work out with the
one, there's stiII the other.

That was a bit too heavy.
Try again.

You're pIaying it safe, baby.

If it doesn't work out with the
one, there's stiII the other.

The first was OK but the second
shouId be a bit tighter.

That was good.



That isn't true.

To you, aII girIs are inter-
changeabIe. - On the contrary.

''On the contrary''
a bit tighter, pIease.

You're pIaying it safe, baby.
If it doesn't work out

with the one, there's stiII
the other. - That isn't true.

To you, aII girIs are inter-
changeabIe. - On the contrary.

What's wrong?
- What's wrong!

What took you so Iong?
I've been waiting here an hour.

It took Ionger at the studio.
- You couId've phoned.

There wasn't time. - No time
for a phone calI? - No.

New shirt? - No.
Just haven't worn it IateIy.

Suits you.
- Thanks.

Want another drink?
- A coke.

What did you do today?
- Nothing speciaI.



CIeaned up. Went to the Iibrary.
I read and did some thinking.

About what?

About quitting my studies.
It's a waste of time.

Are you sure?
- Yeah.

These guys I study with,
aII obsessed with their careers.

It bores me stiff.

Such peopIe are everywhere.
But that's no reason to hide.

That may be. But
it's not as easy as you think.

I know it's not easy.

But you've already quit
so many things. - So what?

What do you want to do now?
- We'Il see. Let's drop it.

I saw your girIfriend
on the street yesterday.

Who? - The bIonde with the
short hair. I forget her name.

You mean Marie.
She's not my girIfriend.

More of an acquaintance.
- You Iike her.

Come off it.
We've known each other so Iong.

I've heIped her
prepare a few presentations.

She's dulI.
She means nothing to me.

It's disgusting how you taIk
about your acquaintances.

I wonder what you teII peopIe
about me. - You picking a fight?

One can't fight with you.

What do I mean to you?
- But, Deniz, we're together!

And why? - If you don't know
the answer to that question.. .

What do you want from me?
- I've asked you.

I don't feeI
Iike answering that.

If for once you'd say
what you reaIIy thought!

But you probabIy don't think.
- Just stop it aIready!

On any given day,

how many women do you see
on the street that attract you?

Two or three, maybe. At most.
- Two or three! That's a Iot.

That's sixty women a month.
Pretty good selection.

It doesn't mean anything.
Don't you look around?

You also see guys you like.
- No, that doesn't interest me.

How do you Iike her?
- Who?

The waitress.
- Yes, she's good Iooking.

But that doesn't mean anything.

Good, I'II taIk to her for you.
- What?

I'lI talk to her for you.

What's this, are you jealous?
- I'm not. On the contrary.

Listen, it's not my fauIt
if you've had a bad day.

Don't take it out on me.

DeaIing with those fiIm idiots
doesn't seem to do you good.

I haven't had a bad day. And the
guys I work with are very nice.

You're probabIy very nice to
them, too. - What do you know.

You're right.
I don't even want to know.

For one, l don't want to know
what you've done to get ahead.

You're repuIsive.

I'm sorry.
I didn't mean it Iike that.

The onIy thing you know is how
to drag things through the mud.

And what do you do? Nothing!
- I said I was sorry.

I can't stand it here any more.

Deniz!

Wait a minute!

Where are you going?

Let's go to the lake.

Come on.

What if we broke up?

Why shouId we break up?

Because I don't
Iove you anymore.

If that's how you see it.

Is that alI you have to say?

What shouId I say?

You're a coward.
I don't understand

how l couId've faIlen in love
with someone Iike you.

What's going on here?

You reaIIy
don't understand a thing.

It's just over.

Do me a favor: Leave me aIone.

You want to sit here
by yourseIf?

Come on, Iet's go back.

PIease.

Can l calI you?

Look, it's the actress.

Hey, I want to sIeep with you!

Who said that?

What's wrong?
Cat got your tongues?

He didn't mean it like that.
TelI her you didn't mean it!

What's the big deaI?

You should apoIogize.
- It just sIipped out.

If it happens again,
there'II be troubIe. Understand?

Yeah.

Show a IittIe more respect.
Don't just hang around here.

We're checking out the scene
and making sure everything's OK.

How interesting.

Listen, we'Il waIk you
to your buiIding. As protection.

Sometimes there are creepy guys
around here. - Thanks,

but I don't need any protection.
- We insist.

Whatever. lf it makes you happy.

You're an actress, right?

We know everything
that goes on around here.

So what do you play?
- AII kinds of things.

Let us know if something you did
is going to be on TV. - Sure.

So, I Iive over there.
I can walk the rest aIone.

If you're ever in troubIe,
just come to us.

We'Il take care of it.

Hi, Deniz. This is LeyIa.
Just wanted to say

I'lI be arriving at Zoo Station
at 1 9:28.

I'lI onIy have 2 hours
before my next train.

Look forward to seeing you. Bye.

HeIIo, Mama.
- HeIIo, sweetheart.

Come in.

ShaII I make you some tea?
- I'lI heIp you in a sec.

Lass nur,
ich mach das schon.

Deniz,
do you want anything to eat?

No thanks. I'm not hungry.

You should Iook after yourseIf.
You Iook thin.

Mama. I Iook the same as ever.
And I do Iook after myseIf.

You've got a new hairstyle.

I actuaIly wanted it different.
Not so short.

It looks good.
- ReaIIy?

Yeah, it suits you.

How's work?
- It's going weII.

GIad to hear it.

And how're you doing?

I'm fine.
It's just so quiet in the fIat

since you and your sister Ieft.

I'm stiII not used to it.

I hope you haven't onIy come
to eat or do your Iaundry.

You can't seriousIy think that.

No, I don't.
I'm taIking like an oId woman.

I must get on your nerves.

No, but you
shouIdn't Iive aIone.

You're an attractive woman.
You couId meet someone

if you wanted.

It's hard for me.

I know it's dumb,

but I compare everyone
to your father.

I don't know

if I couId get used
to anyone like that again.

I don't even know if I want to.

Is there no one in your office
that you Iike?

No. And just
because you work with someone

is no reason
to get invoIved with them.

Besides, one should
seperate such things.

It just compIicates everything.

How is Jan?

I've broken up with him.

Why?
Did you have a fight?

It's over.
I don't Iove him anymore.

I thought you two got aIong.

That's too bad.
He was nice.

Yeah, he is nice.

I won't give you any advice.

You must know
what you're doing,

but don't wait forever for the
Iove of your life to come aIong.

I don't.
But you must have standards.

Otherwise there's no point.

You're being arrogant.
Look around you.

Nowadays peopIe treat each other
Iike disposable objects.

It's not good.

Before you realIy know
each other, you break up.

You get to know peopIe fast
when you're together with them.

But when things stop moving,
it's over.

Listen to you!

You're too impatient.
A partnership has to grow.

I wasn't madly in love

with your father at first.

But with time,
we got aIong better and better.

He respected me and I him.

That's worth a lot.

But you fought so much.
AII night long, sometimes.

LeyIa and I were aIways being
woken up by your arguments.

I know for a fact that you often
wanted to separate.

But we never did. - For the
chiIdren's sake or out of habit!

Not out of habit. More out
of a sense of responsibility.

There's nothing wrong
with assuming responsibility

for a chiId or a partnership.

'Partnership' - what a horrid
word! lt sounds so sensibIe.

It's not easy
to get aIong with someone

you've Iived with for over
20 years. That's a Iong time.

You've got to be sensibIe
once in a whiIe.

And just because you fight,

it doesn't mean
you're not happy.

Happiness isn't jolIy.

Where exactIy in Prenzlauer
Berg? - Christburger Strasse.

Good.

Is there a probIem?

Does the music bother you?
ShouId l turn it off? - No.

Your name is...
- Deniz Turhan.

OK. lt'lI be just a moment.
PIease take a seat.

HeIIo.
- HeIIo.

Goodbye. We'II be in touch.

Deniz. You can come in now.

HeIIo.
- HeIIo.

Let's get started.

The best thing wouId be
for you to introduce yourseIf.

My name is Deniz Turhan.
I'm 2 1 years oId.

I Iive in Berlin
and l'm an actress.

You know that this is
for a Ieading roIe? - Yes.

Do you think you're up to it?

I wouIdn't be here if I didn't.

TelI us something.

Ask me something more specific.

Show us something about yourseIf
that you've experienced.

Or teII us about a fiIm that
you especialIy Iiked recently.

It was a few weeks ago.

I had worked alI day and
was very tired when l got home.

I turned on the TV
and channeI-surfed a bit.

Then I happened
upon a realIy good fiIm.

It teIIs the story of a girI,
about 1 6 or 1 7.

It's summer.

The girI is at a summer camp
by the sea.

You see her at a play rehearsaI.

Soon it's performed,
at night, out-of-doors.

The Iines she speaks
are about Iove.

The next day
she meets her boyfriend.

He's foIIowed her.

Her mind is elsewhere.

He feeIs that she
is distancing herseIf from him.

He gives her a present
and then they part.

They both know that it's over.

Then the hoIidays are past.

She's back home with her famiIy.

Her parents, who argue alI
the time, own a tailor's shop.

Her oIder brother
works there too,

though he reaIIy
wants to be a writer.

She goes out a Iot
and soon has a new boyfriend.

He has to do
his miIitary service.

They taIk about whether they'II
remain faithfuI to each other.

One evening she comes home Iate.

Her father is stiII up.

They have a Iong taIk.

It's the first such talk
they've had.

He teIIs her
that he's Ieaving the famiIy.

He has a mistress.

Then she meets someone.

He is stilI very young,
not much oIder than she is.

She thinks
he's different from the others.

Soon after they get married.

A year Iater
her brother throws a party.

They've soId the shop.

Her brother is now a writer,
but no one takes him seriously.

At the party, she fIirts
with a friend of her husband's.

They've known each other
a long time.

Her husband ignores her.

A few months Iater
she Ieaves him.

She packs her things.

Her father accompanies her
to the airport.

On the bus,
they have another Iong taIk,

Iike the time
she came home late.

Her father telIs her she's
not capabIe of loving anyone.

Then they say goodbye.

She fIies to America
with her husband's friend.

That's how the fiIm ends.

Good. Then that's aII for today.

That was it?

Yes.

We'Il Iet you know
as soon as we decide.

How long wiII that take?
- Not Iong. We'Il be in touch.

Were you hiding?

This afternoon I thought
you were going away. - Why?

You had a bag with you.
- I just had my laundry in it.

Do you Iive in that building
you were going into? - Yes.

Then we're aImost neighbors.
I Iive on the Koch Strasse.

Where exactIy? - In one of the
houses with the red staircases.

Funny I've never seen you there.

I haven't Iived there Iong.
Just a few months.

Just moved to Berlin?
- No, I was born here.

What do you do?
- I work as an actress.

Can you Iive off of it?
- It's not easy.

At the moment
I earn my money dubbing fiIms.

Then I've probably heard your
voice before. - I doubt it,

I haven't been doing it Iong.
And what do you do?

I'm in radio. Music department.
- What exactIy do you do there?

I arrange the music
for a few shows.

Must be pretty easy work if you
hang out in the streets aII day.

I have the day off.

What's your name?
- Deniz. And you?

Diego.
- You have a Spanish name.

No, Portuguese.
I grew up there. In Lisbon.

How long have you been
in BerIin? - Almost 20 years.

Do you go back to PortugaI
often? - At Ieast twice a year.

My parents
have moved back there.

They Iike the climate better.

Have you ever been in Lisbon?
- No.

It sounds dumb, but I
don't Iike to traveI. - Why not?

I don't feeI good in pIaces
I don't know. I miss my friends.

Besides,
I'm terrified of flying.

You reaIIy never travel?
- Only when l have to.

In summer
I Iike to stay in Berlin.

In winter I can't stand it.
I can't get used to it.

If l'm happy,
I don't care what season it is.

I think the weather
affects peopIe.

Can you imagine
that in northern Scandinavia

the sun doesn't rise
for two months in winter?

It never gets lighter
than dusk here.

It makes people sick.
They have to get light therapy.

Do you aIways taIk about
the weather in your famiIy?

Are you making fun of me?
- No, I Iike taIking to you.

Let's waIk a bit.
- OK.

ShaII we go for a drink?

How late is it?
- Seven or seven-thirty.

Oh, I've got to go
to the station!

You're going away?
- No, I'm meeting someone.

Right away?
- Yes.

CouId we see each other later?
- WelI. .. lt won't take Iong.

I couId wait for you somewhere.
- OK.

Do you know the SchIeusenkrug?
It's not far. - Yes. At ten.

LeyIa, I'm sorry! Have you been
waiting Iong? - A few minutes.

The train was Iate anyway.

Let me take your bag.
- No, I can carry it myself.

Come on, Iet me take it.

Wait, I've got change.

Let's go out this way.

Did you have a good trip?
- Yes.

Let me take a Iook at you.
You Iook good.

And you Iook reaIIy chic.
- Not reaIly.

I mean it.

Here we are.

What were you doing in Munich?

Our firm is buiIding an office
bIock for an insurance company

next year and
we were checking out the site.

Do you reaIly
have to travel on tonight?

Yes. I've got
a lot to do tomorrow.

Mama'II be sad to hear you were
in town and didn't visit her.

I'lI caII her and expIain.

How is she?
- I was over there today.

She's stiII
hasn't gotten over Papa.

She just changes the past.

Just about anyone else
wouId have been better for her.

You're realIy hard on him.
You always were.

Maybe.

You never got on with him. But
that doesn't appIy to everyone.

You got on better with him.

You were aIways his darIing.

You haven't changed.

I give up.
I can't deaI with these things.

What is the matter with you?

I'm pregnant.
- What?

Yeah. I don't know what to do.

How far aIong are you?
- Two months.

I've onIy known for a few days.
I haven't toId anyone yet.

Not even your boyfriend?

Why not?

Are you afraid of his reaction?

I know that he'II be happy
and l'm aIso happy with him.

But I stiIl don't know
what to do. I've got a good job.

I'm just getting estabIished.
And I enjoy the work.

If you Iove each other, don't
you think you couId manage it?

I work 1 2 hours a day
and some weekends as welI.

That's normaI in offices Iike
ours. What am I supposed to do?

And if you took some time off?

Then I'm gone. I didn't study
so l couId become a housewife.

But you're not the onIy one.
Other peopIe have managed it.

They go back to work Iater.

That's easy to say.

You forgot your fortune cookie.
Don't you want to open it?

Later.

''The Year of the Dragon wiII
bring you Iuck and success.''

WelI, it's about time.

TelI me about you.
How are you doing?

It doesn't matter.

No, I want to know.

I broke up with Jan.
- You broke up with him?

Yeah. He's been getting
on my nerves for a Iong time.

He's totaIly egocentric
but can't stand being alone.

I hate guys
who can't make up their minds.

I shouId've known earIier.

Maybe you'II
Iearn something from it.

I met someone today,
just before l met you.

That's why I was Iate.

I met him on the street. That's
never happened to me before.

It was Iike we aIready
knew each other.

First impressions
can be misleading.

Are you sure you're not making
another mistake?

I don't know.
Just a feeIing.

You reaIIy Iike him?
- Yeah.

Are you going to meet again?
- We've got a date for Iater on.

You're not wasting any time!

Don't you think
you're moving a bit too quickIy?

You just broke up
with your boyfriend.

In reality, we've been apart
for a Iong time.

Besides, how often do you meet
someone that interests you?

AII the same, maybe
you should think things over.

What's past is past.

You're aIways after something.
Why don't you take it easy.

LeyIa, I think
you should keep the baby.

You've taIked about it so often.

You've got a boyfriend
you're happy with.

You should talk to him.

It'II be born in spring. Would
you prefer a boy or a girl?

I don't know. A girI, I guess.

You don't need to wait
tilI the the train comes.

I'lI keep you company.
- Remember your date.

I won't go.
- WelI, come on, then.

I stiIl haven't seen your fIat.
- It's nice. You'lI Iike it.

You should come back and
visit when you have more time.

HeIIo.
- HeIIo.

I didn't think
you were going to come.

What did you do in the meantime?
- I waited.

Do you come here often?
- Not reaIly.

Who did you meet?

You're inquisitive.
- I am.

My sister. She was just passing
through. She Iives in Hamburg.

What does she do? - She works
in an architect's office.

Do you have any sibIings?
- An oIder brother.

Like me.
My sister is aIso oIder than me.

Do you get aIong?

I Iike him but we don't have
much to say to one another.

He Iives in Frankfurt.
He owns a restaurant.

He wife just left him
and took both the kids.

Since then he's been pretty
depressed. But I can't help him.

He's stiII your brother.

We don't see each other often.
And then, it's aIways the same.

He acts Iike the big brother
and l , Iike the littIe one.

BasicaIIy, I can only
stand him from a distance.

I think that's normal.
Now each goes his own way.

But why am l teIIing you this?
I must be boring you.

No, but I couId never taIk
about my sister like that.

And if you Iove someone, can you
onIy stand them from a distance?

That's different.

ShaII we go this way?

What have you done so far
as an actress?

Not much. A few ads
and a few smaIl roles in fiIms.

I was an extra in a fiIm once.

What's it Iike for you, acting?
- Depends on the roIe.

It's nice,
being able to be someone eIse.

It's Iike Iosing yourseIf.

That's the part I Iike best.

Do you aIso perform
for people in reaI life?

Maybe. One is aIways
acting a bit in Iife.

And who are you playing now?

I don't know. I don't have
the feeling that l'm acting now.

That's a nice ring.
Where'd you get it?

My girlfriend gave it to me.

Your girlfriend.

Yes.

Where is she now,
your girlfriend?

She's abroad. She got a grant
to study in the U.S.

What does she do?
- She's a painter.

You seem Iike someone
who lives aIone.

I've been aIone for a year.

At times
I've aImost forgotten her.

When's she coming back?
- Tomorrow.

Tomorrow? You must be Iooking
forward to seeing her.

Do you Iove her?

Yes, I think so.

You think so.
- Yes.

You forget her
aIthough you Iove her.

A year is a long time.

So you sometimes get bored
and taIk to women on the street.

Do you think it was wrong of me
to talk to you?

No. I didn't have to answer.

And you?
Do you Iive with anyone?

Yes.

That is, no.

We broke up recentIy. Today.

I'm gIad we met.
It does me good to taIk to you.

ShaII I make you another cup
of coffee? - No, I've got to go.

Then I'lI waIk you home.

Don't bother.
I'd Iike to waIk aIone a bit.

WilI we see each other again?
- Like untiI now. By chance.

You sure?
- Yes.

What are you doing here?
You frightened me.

I was worried.
I couIdn't reach you.

You've stiII got your
cIothes on. What were you doing?

I was out. Got home Iate.

You once asked me
if I wouId move in with you.

We shouId have given it a try.
- Yeah, but you didn't want to.

That was probabIy a mistake.

You're onIy saying that
because it's too late.

We couId've Iearned something.
- We have.

Even if it's not very pIeasant.

We've known each other
two years.

Does that count for nothing
aII of a sudden?

It wasn't alI of a sudden. We
dragged things out artificialIy.

We were mistaken.

What are you going to do now?

You mean without you?

Excuse me.
CouId l have a cigarette?

HeIp yourseIf.

Can l use your Iighter?
- Sure.

Are you a writer?

Too IittIe imagination.
I teach.

Am I disturbing you?
- No, you're not disturbing me.

Then you're a teacher.
- I work at the university.

What do you teach?
- History.

I teach the history of
daiIy Iife, of everyday things:

how we eat, sleep,
bury our dead, Iove.

Sounds interesting.
- It is. What do you do?

I'm an actress.
So you teach about Iove?

Not directIy. I teach
about the history of love,

the behaviors associated with it
and what they mean to us.

Hasn't Iove always been the
same experience, then or now?

Our romantic ideal of Iove is an
invention of the 1 8th century.

But emotions like Iove, jeaIousy
and so on have aIways existed.

Perhaps, but they
didn't have the same meaning,

because other things
took precedence.

PeopIe were trying to survive.
So the values of protection,

security and soIidarity
were more important.

These days we have
far greater possibiIities

to express our feelings
and to reaIize them.

Things don't
work out that way for me.

As soon as l get together
with someone, it goes wrong.

Life is more compIicated now as
we do have more possibiIities.

EarIier, reIations were
Iargely determined through work.

Today we have both private
and professionaI reIationships.

You, too. You have to jump from
one to the other and it's tough.

Does that mean we have
to choose between love and work?

It means that there are
reIationships that are primarily

structured via work and others
that are defined by emotions.

It makes life more compIicated.

It's so hard
to talk about emotions.

Whenever l try, it sounds
sort of faIse, hackneyed.

Like l'm just repeating myseIf.
- It's no different for me.

We're expected to aIways feeI
the right thing, to be sincere.

We're surrounded
by expectations.

So when we want to say something
about ourselves, we're not sure

if we're onIy just repeating
something we've heard.

There are gestures, Iooks. They
have something real about them.

That is perhaps the most direct
form of expression we have.

But we wouldn't Iive more
authenticaIIy without Ianguage.

It wouId impoverish
our expressive potentiaI.

If one views Iove
not as a private emotion

but as a means of communication,
it might take one further.

Everyone breaks up
and finds a new partner.

It's so random. ShouIdn't one
Iove just one person forever?

It's hard to foster Iove
and make it last.

And when it's over,
it doesn't mean it never existed

or can't exist again.
It's a possibiIity.

If a girI Iikes me straight off,
it never works out.

With me it's just the opposite.

I wasn't initialIy attracted to
the first boy l went out with.

If he hadn't made an effort,
nothing wouId've come of it.

But it didn't Iast.
- It lasted three years.

EngIish subtitles:
aIias FiIm & Sprachtransfer