True Detective (2014–…): Season 1, Episode 2 - True Detective - full transcript

Cohle and Hart travel around trying to track down leads to their case. Darker sides of Hart's personal and family lives are revealed.

(THEME SONG PLAYING)
COHLE: Back then, not sleeping, I'd lay awake thinking about women.
My daughter, my wife.
I mean, it's like
something's just got your name on it, like a bullet
or a nail in the road.
Shit. Sorry. I drift.
Sometimes when I've had a few of this.
That's why I like to drink alone. One reason, anyway.
(LIGHTER CLICKS)
- About that sculpture thing. - COHLE: Hmm.
Kind of strange it turns up like that, years later.
Yeah, nobody knew why that thing was in the playhouse.
(DISTANT TYPEWRITER KEYS TAPPING)
I mean, the aunt reckoned maybe it was something she made in school, you know.
To me, it was like someone was having a conversation, you know.
Girl's school shut down in '92, closed down after Andrew.
That mean anything to you?
Oh, we notified the deceased's mother.
(WOMAN SOBS)
HART: Do you remember the last time you saw your daughter Dora?
WOMAN: It was a horrible, horrible thing.
We saw it on TV.
What we were in the clutches of.
And I prayed, I prayed for that woman's family.
And it's me.
It's me.
- Mrs. Kelly, what about her father? - Hmm.
Did they have a relationship?
Why? What have you heard?
I heard he passed. Is that correct?
Why wouldn't a father bathe his own child?
- (SIGHS) - HART: Ahem.
We, uh, were just wondering how they got on, ma'am.
WOMAN: He died on the road.
He drove a Peterbilt, and he took an exit too fast.
Rolled over near Rowan, Oklahoma.
May 11th, 1984.
When was the last time you talked to her?
You know, she's always been in some kind of trouble.
I thought things were getting better.
Got away from Charlie.
She came by not too long ago, maybe a month.
She didn't talk about her daddy none. Said she'd been going to church.
Do you, um, do you remember where that church was?
Oh...
- Mrs. Kelly? - No.
Ow.
(GROANS)
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Hail Mary, full of grace...
- Mrs. Kelly. - I... I get these headaches.
It's like storms. Oh.
I worked in dry-cleaning for 20 years.
The chemicals.
That's what's wrong with my nails.
HART: Piece of work, huh?
My mother, Donna Reed type.
Packed lunches, bedtime stories.
Your mom still alive?
Maybe.
PAPANIA: Cohle ever talk about his parents?
HART: No. Little bit. About his dad.
Alaska, 'Nam.
You know, my dad, I had about, uh, six inches on him,
and even in the end, I still think he could have taken me.
Yeah. Marines, Korea.
Never talked about it.
You know, there was a time that men didn't air their bullshit to the world.
You know, it just wasn't a part of their job.
Well, family.
Well, I mean, I...
I think a part of Rust's problem
was there was things he needed that he couldn't admit to.
Afternoon, men.
HART: So, we talked to the victim's friend next, I believe.
COHLE: Miss Carla?
CARLA: I guess she always had her mom's place,
but I thought maybe she'd gotten into something, you know.
Like, uh, gaming, again.
Having a rough time.
What all did y'all talk about?
How was she?
Thin, loopy, like high.
She was on something.
She said she found a church,
but her eyes,
something wrong with them.
HART: Now, do you remember where this church was?
No.
You know where she might have been staying?
Her landlord said she'd moved out last summer.
That's when I stopped seeing her so much.
She mentioned someplace down south, like around Spanish Lake.
A shelter, girls used to stay there, something, all she said.
Hmm.
COHLE: She sounds sad, Marty.
Like a torn up person on her last legs.
She was just an easy target for him.
What do we know about him?
Hits prosts, artistic, religious in some kind of way.
Every person within a thousand miles of here is religious in some kind of way, except you.
How many DBs have antlers,
blindfolds, painted symbols on their back, hmm?
Yeah, you know what tweakers get up to.
Shit, man, this dude in New Orleans cut up his girl, felt remorse,
tried to piece her back together with Krazy Glue.
That's just drug insanity.
That's not this. This has scope.
Now, she articulated a person with vision. Vision is meaning. Meaning is historical.
Look, she was just chum in the water, man.
(SIGHS)
COHLE: Days of nothing.
That's what it's like, you work cases.
Days like lost dogs.
HART: Goes on like that.
- You know the job. - (CIGARETTE LIGHTER CLICKS)
You're looking for narrative.
Interrogate witnesses.
MACIE: Wake up, Daddy.
Parcel the evidence, establish a timeline,
and build a story day after day.
(HART GROWLS)
(LAUGHS) No! No!
(AUDREY AND MACIE CLAMORING)
Hey, the other night, when you were over for dinner,
why didn't you leave when I had Chris call?
Mmm, I don't know. I guess I had sobered up a little.
Besides, it wasn't as bad as I thought.
Being around your family. I liked talking to them.
"Bad"?
Why'd you think that?
I was married, Marty, for three years.
We had a baby girl. She died.
Car accident. She was two years old.
Marriage couldn't handle it.
Your kid died?
Oh, I...
I'm sorry, man. I am so sorry. I didn't...
No, I mean, it wasn't you guys. It was just me.
I was worried,
you know, being around that kind of thing.
GILBOUGH: Hey, you were married the once, just the once?
Uh-huh. Came close another time.
(SMACKS LIPS)
Laurie.
Maggie introduced us.
It broke off.
It was for the best, you know. I gave her cause.
I can be hard to live with. You know, I...
I don't mean to, but I can be critical.
And sometimes I think I'm just not good for people.
You know, that it's not good for them to be around me.
You know, I... I wear them down.
- You know, they... They get unhappy. - Hmm.
Yeah, I think the job does that to a lot of guys. Changes you.
Some guys just notice, that's all.
Well, I can't say the job made me this way.
More like me being this way made me right for the job.
I used to
think about it more,
but, you know, you reach a certain age, you know who you are.
Now I live in a little room out in the country, behind a bar.
Work four nights a week. In between, I drink.
And there ain't nobody there to stop me.
I know who I am.
After all these years, there's a... There's a victory in that.
HART: Third day on the job, stopped this cutie for speeding.
Fifty-two minutes later, back in her dorm room.
I got my uniform around my knees.
(CHUCKLING)
I'm occupied, so I don't hear anything.
I don't know that her roommate has come home and snuck up behind us.
Oh, shit.
You know how I knew that she was in the room?
She stuck her finger up my ass!
(ALL LAUGHING)
Ruined me. Now I can't do without it.
HART: You miss some things on the job. You know what I mean.
You got to decompress before you can
go being a family man.
What you get into working, you can't have the kids around that.
So, uh, sometimes you got to get your head right.
Mind if I stop by?
WOMAN: I don't know. Where are you?
Elks.
- So you're drunk. - No, I'm not.
I've hardly had anything to drink.
You never hardly have anything to drink.
I have a surprise for you.
- Oh, yeah? - Yeah.
- Is that a yes? - I, uh, might stay up.
Ah.
(COIN CLINKS)
HART: It's for your wife and kids, too.
You got to take your release where you find it or where it finds you.
I mean, in the end, it's for the good of the family.
What's that?
Oh, well, I, uh, got you a present.
(ROMANTIC MUSIC PLAYING)
Don't move a muscle.
I shan't. Just the fingers.
The finger muscles.
Mmm.
Oh, stop.
(GRUNTS)
- You're very naughty. - (LAUGHS) Yes.
You have the right to remain silent.
- (CHUCKLES) - Anything you say
can and will be held against you in a court of law.
You have the right to an attorney.
If you can't afford an attorney, the State will provide you one.
Do you understand your rights?
You definitely have a career in law enforcement.
(CHUCKLES)
Well, I thought I was gonna put these on you.
You want this?
Yeah?
You want it?
(WHISPERS) Yes.
(MOANS)
Mmm.
Mmm.
GILBOUGH: Now, what do you mean, exactly, these visions you mentioned?
COHLE: Oh, shit. I thought you knew.
I told Marty about them, you know, down the line.
Uh, chemical flashbacks, neural damage,
you know, from my time in the HIDTA,
as in "High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area."
I spent four years undercover.
(CHUCKLES)
You know what that means?
That's where they got them Fed rumors, I first come in.
What, you two don't know about them?
Those files are still sealed, huh?
Shit.
Just what have you two heard about me?
LUCY: You wanted Blues?
Quaaludes.
- Downers? - Dopey stuff.
Oh.
What's it run?
I'm thinking Blue go for three a pill.
Then we'll say 200 for the bottle.
I thought you might just take them.
Or that you wanted something else.
Some kind of something else?
No.
(SMACKS LIPS) Then I was thinking, you're a good-looking man,
you wouldn't need a shakedown to get some.
What about rough trade? Scary guys? You girls talk.
Around here, they're rough or whisky limp.
Seen plenty of guys that get touchy.
Something sets them off and they're like little boys.
People always go away around here.
Where would I look?
Working girls might know the blond?
If she was gaming I-10 south side, I heard of this place.
Kind of trailer park.
Girls work and stay.
They call it "The Ranch."
Where's that?
Like, south of Spanish Lake, supposed to be.
You know the place?
What's your deal?
I don't have a deal.
I mean, what do you do?
Never mind. I thought you were gonna bust me.
I told you, I'm not interested.
Yeah, I know.
You're kind of strange, like you might be dangerous.
Well, of course I'm dangerous.
I'm police.
I can do terrible things to people
with impunity.
What'd you do last night? I called up here late.
What were you doing?
- Working. - (CHUCKLES)
Was thinking about dropping by. Where were you?
I was out with girlfriends.
Uh-huh.
Well, I don't like that.
(CHUCKLES)
What, you're jealous?
(SCOFFS)
Don't be stupid.
I just mean that there's a crazy man out there,
and, uh, he's killing women.
Wait, you mean that girl again, that Satanic thing?
Everyone's still talking about that at the courthouse.
It's not just her.
There's more.
There's more? Really?
Yeah, well, we're not saying, keeping it out of the press,
but we're thinking that he's been doing this awhile.
Wow.
Yeah, so no need to go out.
You just have a drink here.
I can't meet a nice man at home.
That hurts me when you speak to me in a passive-aggressive way.
I always talk straight to you.
Excuse me. I meant that since you're married,
I need to be considering my options as a young woman.
- I want things, Marty. - (SIGHS)
(CHUCKLES)
I want things, too.
Yeah, you just want your cake and to eat it, too.
The hell good is cake if you can't eat it?
Mmm.
Morning.
Hey, I think I might have found something good.
Bunny ranch down south, around Spanish Lake.
I thought we were pulling old johns today.
Yeah, we should do this first.
(SNIFFS)
What?
You wash up. You got some pussy on you.
Key to a healthy marriage.
Oh, that's Maggie, huh?
Hey. What's with your fucking nose?
Nothing, man. Sorry. Forget it.
I get a connotation being implied here about my wife?
Are you saying that's wife, that high tide you're walking in with?
(BANGS AGAINST LOCKER)
You got some idea how my wife's pussy is supposed to smell?
No, I just meant you're wearing the same clothes as you did yesterday,
coupled with the fact that I ain't stupid.
I wasn't making no comment as to the particularity of the scent.
You don't say fuck-all about my wife.
Don't say her name.
You got some self-loathing to do this morning, that's fine,
but it ain't worth losing your hands over.
And how would that work, exactly?
Well, I'd just apply a couple pounds of pressure,
snap your wrists.
You're senior detective.
Think I'm lying?
(BANGS AGAINST LOCKER)
You got a specific location for this place
or are we just gonna wander around till we find it?
I got some names.
I'm gonna have to ask for directions.
Maybe you could just follow your nose.
HART: Wherever he picked them up,
I mean, I won't lie, however we left it,
he had some moves.
He knew a few CIs from his narco days.
They knew these parts,
put us in touch with some names, people to talk to.
COHLE: How we doing, boys?
- Hey. - Hello.
We're looking for a little bunny ranch down around these parts.
- Y'all know where we could find it? - No, sir.
- Never heard about it? Little whorehouse? - Nuh-uh.
Sorry, man.
Supposed to be stuck up in the woods around here?
HART: I'll tell you this,
Rust had about as sharp an eye for weakness as I ever seen.
I'll be right back.
(SNIFFS)
It's my bad, boys.
Maybe we got started on the wrong foot there.
Aah!
(GRUNTS)
Aah!
You remember where that little whorehouse is?
(SNIFFS)
Take 353 south.
Gotta exit off the shoulder before we get to the 14.
From there, we take a dirt fishing road to Bayou Chenault.
Okay.
(ENGINE TURNS OVER)
HART: That it?
Mmm-hmm.
WOMAN: Cop car, y'all.
Whose turn is it for the freebie?
WOMAN: I don't do no cops. That's on you guys, remember?
HART: Hello, ma'am.
Martin Hart, Rustin Cohle. State CID.
This your place?
It's my lease.
What is this, some kind of hillbilly bunny ranch?
Excuse me?
You might want to talk to Sheriff Bilson before you start tossing accusations around.
No, I got nothing against hillbillies.
HART: Relax. That's not why we're here. We, uh...
Well, something happened to a girl, and we need to know if any of you knew her.
Yeah. That's Dori.
Something happened?
You know about that woman found outside of Erath?
Oh, no.
WOMAN: Did something happen to Dori?
HART: Were you pretty good friends with her?
She was nice to me when I first came around.
Gave me tips and stuff.
Tips? About what?
Nothing. You know, just how to be.
You got any idea where she might have been staying the last few weeks?
I don't.
Her ex is in prison.
I guess maybe she got a new place.
She'd been going to church.
I was hoping maybe she just turned things around.
We're gonna need to question any girls might have known her.
(SCOFFS)
That's a tougher ask than you think.
Folks'll be staying away, they hear y'all are out here.
Well, ma'am, it's the best way to get us to leave.
(SIGHS)
- You said she left a bag? - Yeah.
Can I see it?
Sure.
(DOOR CLOSES)
That girl's not 18.
Sheriff know you got underage working here?
What do you know about where that girl's been?
Where she come from?
You want to know Beth's situation,
before she ran out on her uncle?
There are other places she could go.
Such holy bullshit from you.
It's a woman's body, ain't it?
A woman's choice.
Well, she don't look like a woman to me.
At that age, she is not equipped to make those kind of choices.
But I guess you don't give a shit what kind of damage she's doing to herself
as long as you're making your money.
Girls walk this earth all the time screwing for free.
Now, why is it you add business to the mix, and boys like you can't stand the thought?
I'll tell you.
It's 'cause suddenly you don't own it the way you thought you did.
(DOOR OPENS)
COHLE: Ahem.
COHLE: Ma'am, you've both been very helpful.
We'll be in touch.
Yes, thank you for your help.
Do something else.
That a down payment?
Is shitting on any moment of decency part of your job description?
"I closed my eyes and saw The King in Yellow moving through the forest."
This is her diary, Marty.
Believe this shit? A girl that young?
You know the sheriff has got a stake in this place, too.
Fucking Christ.
"The King's children were marked.
"They became his angels."
(ENGINE TURNS OVER)
COHLE: The Yellow King, Carcosa.
Nut job.
Fried her brain on whatever she was on.
Sounds like she didn't have much to begin with.
Well, it reads like fantasy.
What if he was dosing her regular,
and over a period of time, upping the dose little by little without her knowing?
We should stay out here today, check around for johns, maybe knew her.
Look at this.
Oh, yeah. Man, a lot of these type places.
Expect the flock to canvass for them.
You know, we should go there. Could be the church everyone mentioned.
Well, let's check around for johns while we're out here
And pick up the church on Monday.
GILBOUGH: Most of your stuff's still redacted.
Now, what's Northshore?
Northshore Psychiatric Hospital.
Lubbock, Texas. I spent four months there in '93.
- You feel like talking about that? - Well, sure.
Who gives a shit?
Sofia, my daughter, she was on her tricycle in our driveway.
Um...
We lived on... We were in a little bend in the road, and...
They said that...
Anyway, afterwards, uh,
Claire and I turned on each other, you know.
We... We resented each other for being alive, you know.
I transferred from Robbery to Narco.
Started hitting it, you know, 24/7.
Street rips, knocking down doors.
Within three months I was ripping off couriers
or ending up in a Ramada Inn with a couple of fucking eight-balls.
Oh, yeah.
Somewhere in there Claire left,
and somewhere in there I emptied a .9 into a crankhead
for injecting his infant daughter with crystal.
Said he was trying to purify her.
State Attorney gave me one chance to stay out of jail.
He said, "You can keep your profile, but we wanna make you our wildman junkie."
So they did. They made me a floater, like a trick.
You know, any agency or department needed a deep undercover narco,
they got me.
And there was no fucking expiration date, baby.
And they kept you out there for four years?
(EXHALES) Mmm-hmm.
In February of '93, I killed three cartel men at the Port of Houston.
I took three .25s in the side
and ended up at Northshore Psychiatric Hospital in Lubbock, Texas.
Which is kind of funny in its own right.
Psych ward being in Lubbock, Texas. (CHUCKLES)
You ever been there?
They offered me a psych pension.
Jackpot, right?
I said no. I said, "Put me on Homicide somewhere."
By then, I was owed quite a few favors,
and, uh, Louisiana was what they had.
Yeah, for a long time after, I... I didn't really sleep.
Nightmares, PTSD, exhausted nerves, whatever.
Yeah.
Why Homicide?
Oh, something I saw at Northshore.
Quote from Corinthians.
"The body is not one member, but many.
"Now are they many,
"but of one body."
What's that mean, though?
I was just trying to stay a part of the body now. (CHUCKLES)
MACIE: The fishing pole's not working.
- Just ask Grandpa. - No.
- Yeah. - Grandpa, I can't tell if it's working.
You'll know, honey. It'll yank at you hard.
- Okay. - Why don't you...
How's that case going? The big one?
Working it, you know.
Things like that didn't happen these parts when I was young.
People said "ma'am" and "sir."
Families stayed together.
(SIGHS)
Yeah, that's how it was, huh?
Not all the time.
There was more dignity.
Everyone wasn't out in the street, yelling about their rights.
Well, if things were so great, they never would have changed.
Hmm.
Nothing is going on.
I'm just saying, if there's a problem, you can talk to me. You know that.
If I have a problem with someone, I talk to them, Ma.
Well, you should be able to talk to me.
I know what it's like to be married to a man.
You think they're all the same, huh?
I don't know why you're so rude to me. If you're frustrated, don't take it out on me.
I think that you need to get your cable fixed
and stop confusing me with your soap operas.
Well, you beat up on what you can't control.
Makes it bad for everybody else.
MACIE: I don't know how. AUDREY: I don't care. Just try.
- You do it. - I can't.
You have smaller fingers.
Macie, just do it.
So, you're telling me the world isn't getting worse?
I've seen kids today, all in black, wearing makeup, shit on their faces.
Everything's sex.
Clinton.
You know, throughout history,
I bet every old man probably said the same thing.
And old men die, and the world keeps spinning.
- Honey, I got this lead... - How are the girls?
I got this lead I wanted to check up on. I told you about it.
- Maybe your dad could bring you back. - No. You didn't tell me anything about it.
This is a family day.
I did tell you about it. I mentioned it.
It's the new case.
Okay, well, how about we all head back, then?
Hmm. All right, sweetheart.
Come on! Let's go!
MACIE: Our lines tangled.
- MAGGIE: Just paddle in. - Okay.
Told you!
- MAGGIE: Thanks for the lovely afternoon. - GRANDPA: Oh.
Thank you.
(ROCK MUSIC PLAYING)
(KNOCKS ON DOOR)
Afternoon, sir.
- How you doing today, Officer? - I have a question for you.
You ever seen this girl?
- You never seen her before? - Never before.
How about you?
(SHUTTER CLICKS)
Question.
I'm looking for this young lady. Do you recognize her?
I might need a memory jog.
Dora. Young blonde?
Dora. Dora, Dora, Dora, Dora.
Dora.
Have any guys come around lately looking for anything more than a good time?
You might be able to remember for a little more money?
- I might. - You might?
(ICE CUBES CLINK)
Years, we've been through this.
Sweetheart, listen to me. There is nowhere else I want to be.
(SCOFFS)
I wonder if you even know you're lying.
Oh, come on!
Shh.
Bad enough the shit I got to wade through on a daily basis,
bring me this "feel bad for me" crap
when I work 30 hours straight
and spent the weekend listening to your dad's bullshit.
I come home, the one place where there's supposed to be peace and calm,
- and you throw this shit... - Who told you that?
It's not always that way. It's not supposed to be.
It's supposed to be what I want. It's supposed to help me.
We do help you! All the goddamn time!
Okay, well, what do you want me to say?
You want me to talk about the woman, had antlers?
Do you want me to tell you about the kids disappearing,
and maybe you'll stop with the "poor me" little whiny bullshit?
Is that what you're saying, hmm?
That I'm trying to make you feel bad for me?
Is that really how you want to play this?
No, honey.
I think you're the greatest woman I ever met,
and you're the greatest thing that ever happened to me.
But, yeah, you know, sometimes
I think you might have a penchant for self-pity.
And right now I need you to be strong so that I can do my job.
You have developed some sort of selective deafness.
You used to not be such a chicken shit, I swear.
Even your mom thinks you're a ball-buster.
Tell the girls, dinner.
Mmm.
AUDREY: You don't have a mommy or daddy anymore.
Yeah, they just died in an accident.
MACIE: HOW?
In a car accident. Someone...
Dinnertime, kids. Go to the kitchen.
Are you coming?
- Yeah, of course. I'm starving. - Really?
- Yeah, really. - (GIGGLES)
Good.
COHLE: You know, I think about my daughter now.
And what...
What she was spared.
Sometimes I feel grateful.
(SIGHS)
Doctors said she didn't feel a thing, went straight into a coma.
And then, somewhere in that
blackness, she slipped off into another
deeper kind.
Isn't that a beautiful way to go out? (CHUCKLES)
Painlessly.
As a happy child.
COHLE: Hmm.
Yeah, trouble with dying later is you've already grown up.
Damage is done. It's too late.
(SIGHS)
You got kids?
Mmm.
I think of the hubris it must take to
yank a soul out of nonexistence into this meat.
And to force a life into this thresher.
And as for my daughter, she, uh...
she spared me the sin of being a father.
HART: Hi, Cathleen, you little vixen.
(CATHLEEN GIGGLES)
- Any chance of some coffee? - Of course.
Okay.
Who are these guys?
Some assholes Quesada brought in.
Coffee on its way.
- Hey, morning, Marty. - Hey.
Major's introducing me to the new flying squad.
You know Mark Daughtry, Ted Bertrand.
Daughtry.
Ted.
- Jimmy Dufrene. - Jimmy Dufrene.
What's up?
We've been tasked with investigating crimes with possible occult links.
There's been a rash of animal mutilations, cemeteries defiled.
And they want to see what we have on the Lange case.
Uh-huh.
Well, this task force is important to the commander and to the governor's office.
You know, a lot of people are concerned about it.
You know, me, I don't see the connection
between two dead cats and a murdered woman.
But then, I'm from Texas.
(CHUCKLES)
We're not stepping on your toes, Marty.
We just got the mandate. We got to compare notes with what you got.
Yeah.
- Here you are, Detective. - No. Thanks, Cathleen.
You got it.
Xerox all you want.
Make you feel like good cops.
You two, my office.
QUESADA: Cohle, we got a new rule around here, especially for you.
You got an opinion about anything, you hold on to it.
You hold on to it or you tell it to Marty. Otherwise, button your big, fat mouth.
However smart you are, you're not as smart as you think.
Are you serious, boss?
This God-bothering shit, it's a political circle-jerk. You know this.
Is this a place you live?
Where are you, huh?
You had anything in the last weeks? You got a suspect?
Give us some more guys to follow up KAs, track records.
No, our bosses don't want you at all, you understand?
I don't want you.
You are upright only by the grace of this man's reputation.
Goddamn, Cohle.
How many ways are there for me to say, "Shut the fuck up"?
I mean, we work under command, right?
Now, our betters want a public, high-profile show of response.
Shit, I got a state senator, he's trying to label Satanic graffiti as a hate crime.
That has nothing to do with our DB, and that's the fact of it.
Okay, okay. Fine. Let's say that's true, all right?
Let's say that you guys get the case all to yourselves.
You ever solve a murder been in the red more than a week?
You ever clear one
where two rounds of questions didn't hand you the fucking answer?
- HART: Oh, come on. - No, no, you got leads, you got a timeline.
You know what I got?
I got a whodunit, where my two detectives are stalling,
and I got a brand-new task force wants to take it off our hands.
- We have a lead, boss. - Oh, for Christ's sake. Fuck off, Cohle.
(QUESADA SIGHS)
Christ.
It's your call.
You want to dump this one off?
You ought to think about it, given the spotlight.
You know, Teddy Bertrand's a good detective. You know him.
Well, you're a smartass with your mouth shut.
I was just gonna say we've got a lead on a church.
Our vic was spending a lot of time there.
That's where we were headed. It could be the break we need.
Inside, whatever they're putting over you, how much more time could you get us?
Right now, it's up for discussion.
But, you know, Tuttle's lighting a fire under this.
Without a suspect,
they're just gonna stop asking questions, Marty, and they're gonna give orders.
That's that.
Give us the rest of the month
before they lump it into whatever the play is with the task force, yeah?
I'll try.
Two weeks, and then you two start catching again.
Yeah.
HART: Let's cut to the point.
As the crow flies,
y'all are wanting to ask about that big throw-down in the woods, yeah?
Eventually, sure. Right now, we're just trying to track the case.
How Cohle worked it, especially.
Which indicates you think I'm too thick to realize
that y'all are trying to jam somebody up.
You're on to something new.
So Cohle didn't want to give it to the task force.
Did you?
No, I did not.
(COUNTRY MUSIC PLAYING)
HART: It don't make sense. There is nothing out here.
According to this map, it should be within these few miles.
Well, ahem, I guess if it's one of those tent revival places, they move around.
Yeah.
Tents usually do.
There's no date on this flyer, which is strange.
There's something up there.
PAPANIA: Wait, wait, back up. Are you saying you hallucinated on the job?
Mmm.
No. I mean, I could always tell what was real or what wasn't, you know.
So when I'd see things, fuck, man, I'd just roll with it.
You still see things?
No.
No, they stopped altogether after I was clean a couple years.
HART: No numbers on this place.
Fire must have happened a long time ago.
Okay. Place is trashed.
This ain't no kind of anything.
COHLE: Yeah, back then, the visions.
Yeah, most of the time, I was convinced, shit, I'd lost it.
Marty.
But there were other times,
I thought I was mainlining the secret truth of the universe.
(ROCK MUSIC PLAYING)